Odysseyware

Award-winning. Powerful. Flexible.

A-G & NCAA APPROVED Odysseyware’s award-winning K-12 Core, Elective and CTE curriculum and instructional tools are utilized by thousands of schools and districts. Dynamic and customizable, Odysseyware provides administrators, teachers and students with powerful and flexible learning solutions that can be utilized in a myriad of instructional settings.

Learning Styles: Linguistic – Word Smart, Interpersonal – People Smart, Intrapersonal – Myself Smart, Visual/Spatial – Picture Smart
Compatibility: Computer & iPad (with some exceptions)
Delivery Format: Web-based

Courses for each grade level are presented below.

Elementary

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
Language Arts 300English Language ArtsLanguage Arts 300 focuses on the sequential development and integration of communication skills in four major areas—reading, writing, speaking, and listening. It most specifically focuses on deepening and furthering students' understanding in the following ways.

Reading introduces students to basic reading skills, including the identification of main ideas, supporting details, sequence, and facts and opinions; shows students how to identify parts of speech in sentences; helps students develop basic literary comprehension skills through the reading of short stories, a short play, and haiku poetry.
Writing develops students’ understanding of sentence structure, providing hands-on experience with complete sentences and parts of speech; introduces students to roots and affixes, and basic word relationships, including homographs, synonyms, and antonyms; develops students’ vocabulary and spelling skills; gives students the opportunity to develop their abilities in writing paragraphs, haiku poetry, short stories, and friendly letters.
Special Topics introduces basic research skills, including the use of atlases, dictionaries, encyclopedias, newspaper and magazine articles, and textbooks.
Language Arts 400English Language ArtsLanguage Arts 400 focuses on the sequential development and integration of communication skills in four major areas—reading, writing, speaking, and listening. It most specifically focuses on deepening and furthering students' understanding in the following ways:

Reading introduces students to basic reading skills, including the identification of main ideas, supporting details, sequence, and facts and opinions; shows students how to identify parts of speech in sentences; develops students capacity for identifying basic elements of narrative prose; introduces students to types of nonfiction, including biographies, autobiographies, and short essays; helps students develop basic literary comprehension skills through the reading of short stories, nonfiction pieces, and poetry.
Writing develops student’s understanding of sentence structure, providing hands-on experience with subject-verb agreement and parts of speech; emphasizes parts of speech and their roles, including adjectives, nouns, and verbs; familiarizes students with roots and affixes, and basic word relationships, including homonyms, synonyms, and antonyms; develops students’ vocabulary and spelling skills; gives students the opportunity to develop their abilities in writing paragraphs, four-line poetry, and short stories; guides students through planning, organizing, writing, and revising a report.
Listening teaches effective listening comprehension skills, weaving these throughout the lessons.
Special Topics teaches basic research skills, including dictionary, encyclopedia, and safe Internet usage.
Language Arts 500English Language ArtsReading develops students’ basic reading skills, including the identification of main ideas, supporting details, sequence, and facts and opinions; introduces more advanced reading skills, showing students how to make inferences and derive implied meanings; shows students how to identify parts of speech in sentences, with emphasis on nouns, adverbs, and verb tenses; develops students’ capacities for identifying basic elements of narrative prose; introduces students to types of nonfiction, including biographies, autobiographies, and short essays; helps students develop basic literary comprehension skills through the reading of excerpts from Beowulf, and Gulliver’s Travels and of various short stories, nonfiction pieces, and poetry.
Writing develops students’ understanding of sentence structure, providing hands-on experience with subject-verb agreement and parts of speech; emphasizes parts of speech and their roles, including adjectives, nouns, and verbs; familiarizes students with roots, affixes, and basic word relationships, including homonyms, synonyms, and antonyms; develops students’ vocabulary and spelling skills; gives students the opportunity to develop their abilities in writing paragraphs, dialogue, poetry, and short stories; guides students through planning, organizing, writing, and revising a report.
Spelling 300English Language ArtsIn the third grade spelling course, students will delve into relevant spelling rules and word families throughout thirty weeks of instruction. Students will not only practice phonics skills including syllabication and sounding out multisyllabic words, but also incorporation of word parts such as prefixes and suffixes. These lessons not only meet instructional needs for spelling, but also reinforce language arts skills including application of the writing process and reading comprehension.

Each unit represents a specific spelling rule or word family. Each unit contains five short assignments per week that can be taught as a stand-alone course, or can easily integrate with English Language Arts curriculum. lessons and projects include media to support the content, as well as incorporation of rubrics and positive messages for students that can support character education requirements.
Spelling 400English Language ArtsIn the fourth grade spelling course, students will delve into relevant spelling rules and word families throughout thirty weeks of instruction. Students will not only practice phonics skills including vowel combinations and sounding out multisyllabic words, but also incorporation of word parts such as prefixes and suffixes. Units include review of base and root words, plural nouns, and homophones. These lessons not only meet instructional needs for spelling, but also reinforce language arts skills including application of the writing process and reading comprehension.

Each unit represents a specific spelling rule or word family. Each unit contains five short assignments per week that can be taught as a stand-alone course, or can easily integrate with English Language Arts curriculum. Lessons and projects include media to support the content, as well as incorporation of rubrics for clear assessment.
Spelling 500English Language ArtsIn the fifth grade spelling course, students will delve into relevant spelling rules and word families throughout thirty weeks of instruction. Students will practice phonics skills including phonograms, compound words, and vowel-consonant-vowel patterns. Course units also include significant incorporation of word parts such as prefixes and suffixes. Units include review of base and root words, silent words, and homophones. These lessons not only meet instructional needs for spelling, but also reinforce language arts skills including application of the writing process and reading comprehension.

Each unit represents a specific spelling rule or word family. Each unit contains five short assignments per week that can be taught as a stand-alone course, or can easily integrate with English Language Arts curriculum. Lessons and projects include media to support the content, as well as incorporation of rubrics for clear assessment.
MATHEMATICS GRADE 3 MATHMath 300 is a full-year elementary math course focusing on number skills and numerical literacy. In it, students will gain solid experience with number theory and operations, learning how to apply these in measurement situations. This course also integrates geometric concepts and skills throughout the units, as well as introducing students to statistical concepts.

By the end of the course, students will be expected to do the following:

Understand place value and know how to compare and order numbers.
Perform addition and subtraction, carrying and borrowing on whole numbers.
Know basic multiplication facts.
Understand representations in fraction and mixed number forms.
Understand concepts of likelihood and basic probability.
Understand concepts of shape, symmetry, and perimeter.
Understand measurement concepts, including time and temperature.
Understand representations using decimals and money.
MATHEMATICS GRADE 4MATHMath 400 is a full-year elementary math course focusing on number skills and numerical literacy. In it, students will gain solid experience with number theory and operations, including decimals and fractions. This course also integrates geometric concepts and skills throughout the units, teaches measurement skills, and introduces students to statistical concepts.

By the end of the course, students will be expected to do the following:

Perform all four operations on whole numbers.
Compare and order numbers, using place value and rounding.
Add and subtract fractions and decimals.
Understand measurement concepts, including the metric system.
Calculate perimeters and areas of regular plane shapes.
Represent data on varied statistical charts.
MATHEMATICS GRADE 5MATHMath 500 is a full-year elementary math course focusing on number skills, numerical literacy, and geometric concepts. In it, students will gain solid experience with number theory and operations, including whole numbers, decimals, and fractions. In addition, students will develop their understanding of measurement and two- and three- dimensional figures. This course also integrates mathematical practices throughout the units, as well as introducing students to algebraic, statistical, and probability concepts.

By the end of the course, students will be expected to do the following:

Perform all four operations on whole numbers and decimals (to hundredths).
Perform addition and subtraction of fractions and mixed numbers with like and unlike denominators.
Understand place value of decimal numbers (to thousandths).
Evaluate expressions for given values and plot whole number ordered pairs on coordinate grids.
Represent and interpret data on line plots, stem-and-leaf plots, line graphs, and bar graphs.
Convert units of measurement within a given measurement system.
SCIENCE Grade 3SCIENCEScience 300 is a basic elementary course intended to expose students to the designs and patterns in the physical universe. This course provides a broad survey of the major areas of science. Some of the areas covered in Science 300 include the human body, plants, animals, health and nutrition, matter, sound waves, earth science, and heat energy.

The curriculum seeks to develop the students' ability to understand and participate in scientific inquiry. The units contain experiments and projects to capitalize on children's natural curiosity. The students will explore, observe and manipulate everyday objects and materials in their environment. Collectively, this should help students develop a subject-matter knowledge base.

SCIENCE GRADE 4SCIENCEScience 400 is a basic elementary course intended to expose students to the designs and patterns in the physical universe. This course builds on concepts taught in Science 300, providing a broad survey of the major areas of science. Some of the areas covered in Science 400 include the study of plants and animals, ecology, work and simple machines, electricity and magnetism, properties of water and matter, weather, the solar system, and the different spheres of earth.

The curriculum seeks to develop the students' ability to understand and participate in scientific inquiry. The units contain experiments and projects to capitalize on children's natural curiosity. The students will explore, observe, and manipulate everyday objects and materials in their environment. Collectively, this should help students develop and build on their subject-matter knowledge base.
SCIENCE GRADE 5SCIENCEScience 500 is a basic elementary course intended to expose students to the designs and patterns in the physical universe. This course expands on the Science 300 and Science 400 courses, providing a broad survey of the major areas of science. Some of the areas covered in Science 500 include the study of cells, plants and animals, ecology, energy, geology, properties of matter, and the natural cycles of life.

The curriculum seeks to develop the students' ability to understand and participate in scientific inquiry. The units contain experiments and projects to capitalize on the students' natural curiosity. The students will explore, observe, and manipulate everyday objects and materials in their environment. Students at this level should begin to understand interrelationships between organisms, recognize patterns in ecosystems, and become aware of the cellular dimensions of living systems. Collectively, this should help students develop and build on their subject-matter knowledge base.
History and Geography Grade 3Social StudiesHistory and Geography 300 focuses on different types of communities and their local industries, such as farming and fishing, placing special emphasis on a variety of manufacturers in Michigan. Additionally, the course presents a survey of several 19th- and 20th-century inventors and inventions. These areas of focus target three major content strands: Geography, History, and Economics.
History and Geography Grade 4Social StudiesHistory and Geography 400 focuses on World Geography, describing the surface of the earth and its natural features (biomes). It also teaches about cultural distinctives, placing special emphasis on North American geography and culture. Then, expanding on instruction, it presents a survey of earth and space explorations. These areas of focus target three major content strands: Geography, History, and Social Studies Skills.
History and Geography Grade 5Social StudiesHistory and Geography 500 focuses on World Geography, describing the surface of the earth and its natural features (biomes). It also teaches about cultural distinctives, placing special emphasis on North American geography and culture. Then, expanding on instruction, it presents a survey of earth and space explorations. These areas of focus target three major content strands: Geography, History, and Social Studies Skills.

Middle School

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
Language Arts 300English Language ArtsLanguage Arts 300 focuses on the sequential development and integration of communication skills in four major areas—reading, writing, speaking, and listening. It most specifically focuses on deepening and furthering students' understanding in the following ways.

Reading introduces students to basic reading skills, including the identification of main ideas, supporting details, sequence, and facts and opinions; shows students how to identify parts of speech in sentences; helps students develop basic literary comprehension skills through the reading of short stories, a short play, and haiku poetry.
Writing develops students’ understanding of sentence structure, providing hands-on experience with complete sentences and parts of speech; introduces students to roots and affixes, and basic word relationships, including homographs, synonyms, and antonyms; develops students’ vocabulary and spelling skills; gives students the opportunity to develop their abilities in writing paragraphs, haiku poetry, short stories, and friendly letters.
Special Topics introduces basic research skills, including the use of atlases, dictionaries, encyclopedias, newspaper and magazine articles, and textbooks.
Language Arts 400English Language ArtsLanguage Arts 400 focuses on the sequential development and integration of communication skills in four major areas—reading, writing, speaking, and listening. It most specifically focuses on deepening and furthering students' understanding in the following ways:

Reading introduces students to basic reading skills, including the identification of main ideas, supporting details, sequence, and facts and opinions; shows students how to identify parts of speech in sentences; develops students capacity for identifying basic elements of narrative prose; introduces students to types of nonfiction, including biographies, autobiographies, and short essays; helps students develop basic literary comprehension skills through the reading of short stories, nonfiction pieces, and poetry.
Writing develops student’s understanding of sentence structure, providing hands-on experience with subject-verb agreement and parts of speech; emphasizes parts of speech and their roles, including adjectives, nouns, and verbs; familiarizes students with roots and affixes, and basic word relationships, including homonyms, synonyms, and antonyms; develops students’ vocabulary and spelling skills; gives students the opportunity to develop their abilities in writing paragraphs, four-line poetry, and short stories; guides students through planning, organizing, writing, and revising a report.
Listening teaches effective listening comprehension skills, weaving these throughout the lessons.
Special Topics teaches basic research skills, including dictionary, encyclopedia, and safe Internet usage.
Language Arts 500English Language ArtsReading develops students’ basic reading skills, including the identification of main ideas, supporting details, sequence, and facts and opinions; introduces more advanced reading skills, showing students how to make inferences and derive implied meanings; shows students how to identify parts of speech in sentences, with emphasis on nouns, adverbs, and verb tenses; develops students’ capacities for identifying basic elements of narrative prose; introduces students to types of nonfiction, including biographies, autobiographies, and short essays; helps students develop basic literary comprehension skills through the reading of excerpts from Beowulf, and Gulliver’s Travels and of various short stories, nonfiction pieces, and poetry.
Writing develops students’ understanding of sentence structure, providing hands-on experience with subject-verb agreement and parts of speech; emphasizes parts of speech and their roles, including adjectives, nouns, and verbs; familiarizes students with roots, affixes, and basic word relationships, including homonyms, synonyms, and antonyms; develops students’ vocabulary and spelling skills; gives students the opportunity to develop their abilities in writing paragraphs, dialogue, poetry, and short stories; guides students through planning, organizing, writing, and revising a report.
Spelling 300English Language ArtsIn the third grade spelling course, students will delve into relevant spelling rules and word families throughout thirty weeks of instruction. Students will not only practice phonics skills including syllabication and sounding out multisyllabic words, but also incorporation of word parts such as prefixes and suffixes. These lessons not only meet instructional needs for spelling, but also reinforce language arts skills including application of the writing process and reading comprehension.

Each unit represents a specific spelling rule or word family. Each unit contains five short assignments per week that can be taught as a stand-alone course, or can easily integrate with English Language Arts curriculum. lessons and projects include media to support the content, as well as incorporation of rubrics and positive messages for students that can support character education requirements.
Spelling 400English Language ArtsIn the fourth grade spelling course, students will delve into relevant spelling rules and word families throughout thirty weeks of instruction. Students will not only practice phonics skills including vowel combinations and sounding out multisyllabic words, but also incorporation of word parts such as prefixes and suffixes. Units include review of base and root words, plural nouns, and homophones. These lessons not only meet instructional needs for spelling, but also reinforce language arts skills including application of the writing process and reading comprehension.

Each unit represents a specific spelling rule or word family. Each unit contains five short assignments per week that can be taught as a stand-alone course, or can easily integrate with English Language Arts curriculum. Lessons and projects include media to support the content, as well as incorporation of rubrics for clear assessment.
Spelling 500English Language ArtsIn the fifth grade spelling course, students will delve into relevant spelling rules and word families throughout thirty weeks of instruction. Students will practice phonics skills including phonograms, compound words, and vowel-consonant-vowel patterns. Course units also include significant incorporation of word parts such as prefixes and suffixes. Units include review of base and root words, silent words, and homophones. These lessons not only meet instructional needs for spelling, but also reinforce language arts skills including application of the writing process and reading comprehension.

Each unit represents a specific spelling rule or word family. Each unit contains five short assignments per week that can be taught as a stand-alone course, or can easily integrate with English Language Arts curriculum. Lessons and projects include media to support the content, as well as incorporation of rubrics for clear assessment.
MATHEMATICS GRADE 3 MATHMath 300 is a full-year elementary math course focusing on number skills and numerical literacy. In it, students will gain solid experience with number theory and operations, learning how to apply these in measurement situations. This course also integrates geometric concepts and skills throughout the units, as well as introducing students to statistical concepts.

By the end of the course, students will be expected to do the following:

Understand place value and know how to compare and order numbers.
Perform addition and subtraction, carrying and borrowing on whole numbers.
Know basic multiplication facts.
Understand representations in fraction and mixed number forms.
Understand concepts of likelihood and basic probability.
Understand concepts of shape, symmetry, and perimeter.
Understand measurement concepts, including time and temperature.
Understand representations using decimals and money.
MATHEMATICS GRADE 4MATHMath 400 is a full-year elementary math course focusing on number skills and numerical literacy. In it, students will gain solid experience with number theory and operations, including decimals and fractions. This course also integrates geometric concepts and skills throughout the units, teaches measurement skills, and introduces students to statistical concepts.

By the end of the course, students will be expected to do the following:

Perform all four operations on whole numbers.
Compare and order numbers, using place value and rounding.
Add and subtract fractions and decimals.
Understand measurement concepts, including the metric system.
Calculate perimeters and areas of regular plane shapes.
Represent data on varied statistical charts.
MATHEMATICS GRADE 5MATHMath 500 is a full-year elementary math course focusing on number skills, numerical literacy, and geometric concepts. In it, students will gain solid experience with number theory and operations, including whole numbers, decimals, and fractions. In addition, students will develop their understanding of measurement and two- and three- dimensional figures. This course also integrates mathematical practices throughout the units, as well as introducing students to algebraic, statistical, and probability concepts.

By the end of the course, students will be expected to do the following:

Perform all four operations on whole numbers and decimals (to hundredths).
Perform addition and subtraction of fractions and mixed numbers with like and unlike denominators.
Understand place value of decimal numbers (to thousandths).
Evaluate expressions for given values and plot whole number ordered pairs on coordinate grids.
Represent and interpret data on line plots, stem-and-leaf plots, line graphs, and bar graphs.
Convert units of measurement within a given measurement system.
SCIENCE Grade 3SCIENCEScience 300 is a basic elementary course intended to expose students to the designs and patterns in the physical universe. This course provides a broad survey of the major areas of science. Some of the areas covered in Science 300 include the human body, plants, animals, health and nutrition, matter, sound waves, earth science, and heat energy.

The curriculum seeks to develop the students' ability to understand and participate in scientific inquiry. The units contain experiments and projects to capitalize on children's natural curiosity. The students will explore, observe and manipulate everyday objects and materials in their environment. Collectively, this should help students develop a subject-matter knowledge base.

SCIENCE GRADE 4SCIENCEScience 400 is a basic elementary course intended to expose students to the designs and patterns in the physical universe. This course builds on concepts taught in Science 300, providing a broad survey of the major areas of science. Some of the areas covered in Science 400 include the study of plants and animals, ecology, work and simple machines, electricity and magnetism, properties of water and matter, weather, the solar system, and the different spheres of earth.

The curriculum seeks to develop the students' ability to understand and participate in scientific inquiry. The units contain experiments and projects to capitalize on children's natural curiosity. The students will explore, observe, and manipulate everyday objects and materials in their environment. Collectively, this should help students develop and build on their subject-matter knowledge base.
SCIENCE GRADE 5SCIENCEScience 500 is a basic elementary course intended to expose students to the designs and patterns in the physical universe. This course expands on the Science 300 and Science 400 courses, providing a broad survey of the major areas of science. Some of the areas covered in Science 500 include the study of cells, plants and animals, ecology, energy, geology, properties of matter, and the natural cycles of life.

The curriculum seeks to develop the students' ability to understand and participate in scientific inquiry. The units contain experiments and projects to capitalize on the students' natural curiosity. The students will explore, observe, and manipulate everyday objects and materials in their environment. Students at this level should begin to understand interrelationships between organisms, recognize patterns in ecosystems, and become aware of the cellular dimensions of living systems. Collectively, this should help students develop and build on their subject-matter knowledge base.
History and Geography Grade 3Social StudiesHistory and Geography 300 focuses on different types of communities and their local industries, such as farming and fishing, placing special emphasis on a variety of manufacturers in Michigan. Additionally, the course presents a survey of several 19th- and 20th-century inventors and inventions. These areas of focus target three major content strands: Geography, History, and Economics.
History and Geography Grade 4Social StudiesHistory and Geography 400 focuses on World Geography, describing the surface of the earth and its natural features (biomes). It also teaches about cultural distinctives, placing special emphasis on North American geography and culture. Then, expanding on instruction, it presents a survey of earth and space explorations. These areas of focus target three major content strands: Geography, History, and Social Studies Skills.
History and Geography Grade 5Social StudiesHistory and Geography 500 focuses on World Geography, describing the surface of the earth and its natural features (biomes). It also teaches about cultural distinctives, placing special emphasis on North American geography and culture. Then, expanding on instruction, it presents a survey of earth and space explorations. These areas of focus target three major content strands: Geography, History, and Social Studies Skills.

High School

Language Arts

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
Course Credit
AG Acrrediated
English 9English/Language ArtsStudents should enter English 9 with a foundation in fiction, drama, poetry, mythology, and nonfiction. This course will provide them with the opportunity to build on that foundation. They will engage in in-depth analysis of more complex literature, view that literature from its historical perspective, and connect it to other arts. They will write literary analyses, logical arguments, informational/explanatory texts, narratives, and focused research projects. These writing tasks will be both formal and informal. Additionally, they will engage in speaking and listening activities that use and incorporate media and technology. As a result of the reading, writing, speaking, and listening students will do in this course, they will grow their vocabulary and their understanding of how to communicate effectively by making skillful choices when expressing themselves with language.10Y
English 10English/Language ArtsEnglish 10 students will study literature that spans centuries, continents, and genres. Each of the four thematically- integrated units encourages close study of this literature and its context. Students will gain valuable cultural insight as they read and write about works depicting the social, personal, religious, and political struggles and triumphs faced by people all over the world and all through history. Students will continue to build their literacy skills by engaging in focused reading, composition, speaking and listening activities, vocabulary study, and research. By the end of the course, students will have gained a broader perspective and will be well-prepared to apply that perspective to the study of American Literature in English 11.10Y
English 11English/Language ArtsEnglish III is a survey of American Literature and literary culture from its inception through the twentieth century. Students will explore the major literary forms, themes, authors, and periods of American Literature. They will understand how this literature represents the experiences of people native to America, those who immigrated to America, and those who were brought to America against their will. Emphasis is placed on a rhetorical analysis of the literature to determine how authors achieve a particular purpose or effect. Through focused readings, composition, speaking and listening activities, vocabulary study and research, students will continue to build the literacy skills they need to meet the challenges of high school and beyond.10Y
English 12English/Language ArtsBy English 12, students have repeatedly peered through the window to humanity that literature has opened for them. Through it, they have gained valuable perspective on their world, past and present. Close-textual interaction with literature should have heightened appreciation for those texts, improved critical and analytical skills in reading and writing, enhanced speaking and listening abilities, and enriched students' academic and personal vocabulary. This course is organized chronologically, so students can see the influences on and evolution of the ideas and forms. Writing, research, and speaking assignments will continue to focus on formulating and expressing ideas and arguments about the readings. Particular emphasis is placed on gaining critical perspective on the relationship between content and form and on synthesizing ideas into clear and concise prose and presentations.

To become critical consumers of text, students will be exposed to increasingly more complex texts to which they apply those skills. In English language arts, that critical content is both rigorous and relevant and includes high-quality contemporary works as well as the classics of literature. In English language arts, that content includes classic myths and stories from around the world, America's founding documents, foundational American literature, and Shakespeare. Students will be enriched as they expand their skills and confidence in English language arts through a comprehensive study.
10Y
English I FundamentalsEnglish/Language ArtsEnglish I continues to build on the sequential development and integration of communication skills in four major areas: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. It most specifically focuses on deepening and furthering students' understanding in the following ways:

Reading reinforces reading comprehension skills by teaching students how to understand and appreciate poetry, drama, informative nonfiction, and fiction; shows students how to analyze, evaluate, and interpret a text; reinforces awareness of the elements and structure of narrative prose; guides students through readings of drama, a novel, and selections from well‐known poetry, and short stories.
Writing furthers students’ understanding of sentence structures; reviews parts of speech and their types, including in‐depth studies on verbs (transitive, intransitive, conjugation, tense, voice, mood); develops students’ understanding of the types and functions of phrases and clauses; teaches language history and etymology to help students build on knowledge of word structures, including prefixes, roots, and suffixes; expands on students’ vocabulary skills; reviews spelling skills; gives students the opportunity to develop their abilities in writing speeches, short essays, poetry, friendly/business letters, and short stories.
Speaking offers students experience in delivering a speech; teaches skills that enable students to become effective speakers and communicators, weaving these skills together throughout the course.
Listening teaches effective listening comprehension skills, weaving these together throughout the lessons.
Special Topics incorporates research skills, including Internet, library, reference material, and multimedia use; includes mass media structure and influence.
10Y
English II FundamentalsEnglish/Language ArtsEnglish II Fundamentals continues to build on the sequential development and integration of communication skills in four major areas: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. It focuses on deepening and furthering students' understanding in the following ways:

Reading reinforces reading comprehension skills by teaching students how to comprehend and appreciate poetry, drama, and fiction; shows students how to analyze, evaluate, and interpret a text; reinforces awareness of the elements and structure of narrative prose; guides students through readings of drama, a novel, and selections of well-known poetry and short stories.
Writing develops studentsÕ understanding of complex sentence and paragraph structures, providing hands-on experience with connectives, transitions, phrases, and clauses; teaches language history and etymology to help students build on knowledge of grammar and word structures; expands on studentsÕ vocabulary skills; gives students the opportunity to develop their abilities in writing a set of instructions, a literary critique, a poem, a short story, and a speech.
Speaking offers students experience in delivering a speech; teaches skills that enable students to become effective speakers and communicators, weaving the skills throughout the course.
Listening teaches effective listening comprehension skills, integrating these throughout the lessons.
Special Topics incorporates research skills, including internet, library, and reference material use.
10Y
English III FundamentalsEnglish/Language ArtsEnglish III continues to build on the sequential development and integration of communication skills in four major areas: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. It most specifically focuses on deepening and furthering students' understanding in the following ways:

Reading reinforces reading comprehension skills by teaching students comprehension techniques for literary fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama; discusses common literary devices; shows students how to analyze, evaluate, and interpret a text; reinforces awareness of the elements and structure of narrative and expository prose; guides students through readings of Thornton WilderÕs Our Town and HemingwayÕs The Old Man and the Sea as well as selections of and excerpts from well-known poetry and nonfiction pieces.
Writing develops studentsÕ writing skills by teaching about clauses and phrases in sentence structures; reviews common sentence construction errors and methods for avoiding them; provides practice in standard and nonstandard English, as well as specialized language use; teaches Greek and Latin roots and prefixes to enhance vocabulary and spelling skills; expands studentsÕ abilities to write cohesive and coherent expository prose; gives students the opportunity to develop their abilities in writing literary critiques, personal essays, poetry, and research papers.
Special Topics incorporates research skills, including Internet, library, and reference material use, throughout the curriculum.
10Y

Math

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
Course Credit
AG Accredited (Y/N)
Algebra IMathAlgebra I is a full year, high school credit course that is intended for the student who has successfully mastered the core algebraic concepts covered in the prerequisite course, Pre-Algebra. Within the Algebra I course, the student will explore basic algebraic fundamentals such as evaluating, creating, solving and graphing linear, quadratic, and polynomial functions.

Upon successfully completing the course, the student should have mastered the following concepts:



Solve and graph single variable, absolute value, and linear equations and inequalities.
Solve linear, quadratic and exponential systems of equations using graphing, substitution or elimination.
Evaluate and solve quadratic equations and inequalities using graphing, factoring, quadratic formula, and completing the square.
Interpret and apply the relationship between the independent and dependent variable in a linear, exponential, and quadratic function through algebraic modeling and applications.
Understand and know how to apply the distance, midpoint, and slope formulas as well as the Pythagorean Theorem.
Form an equation of a line using the slope-intercept, point-slope and standard forms of a line. Apply basic fundamental rules of exponents.
Be able to construct a formula or equation necessary to solve algebraic word problems involving area, perimeter, and linear systems of equations, basic probability and statistical reasoning, distance, and compounding interest.
Evaluate rational expressions and solve equations with rational expressions.
Simplify and perform operations with radical expressions such as addition and subtraction, multiplication and division.
Perform operations with polynomials such as addition and subtraction, multiplication, long division and factoring.
Interpret and analyze measures of central tendency, sample data and outcome, probability and frequency tables.
10Y
Algebra IIMathAlgebra II is a full-year, high school math course intended for the student who has successfully completed the prerequisite course Algebra I. This course focuses on algebraic techniques and methods in order to develop student understanding of advanced number theory, concepts involving linear, quadratic and polynomial functions, and pre-calculus theories. This course also integrates geometric concepts and skills throughout the units, as well as introducing students to basic trigonometric identities and problem solving.

By the end of the course, students will be expected to do the following:

Understand set notation and the structure of mathematical systems.
Calculate and perform operations with real and imaginary numbers.
Know how to use functional notation and operations on functions.
Simplify and solve algebraic fractions.
Perform operations on polynomials, including factoring, long division, and synthetic division.
Solve algebraic word problems involving mixtures, money, integers, and work.
Evaluate and solve radical expressions and equations.
Solve systems of equations with graphing, substitution, and matrices.
Graph and solve quadratic equations, including conic sections.
Graph and solve exponential and logarithmic equations.
Explore trigonometric identities and functions using the Unit Circle, graphs and modeling.
Calculate permutations, combinations, and complex probabilities.
Interpret sample surveys, normal distributions and observational studies.
10Y
GeometryMathGeometry is a full year, high school math course for the student who has successfully completed the prerequisite course, Algebra I. The course focuses on the skills and methods of linear, quadratic, coordinate, and plane geometry. In it, students will gain solid experience with geometric calculations and coordinate plane graphing, methods of formal proof, and techniques of construction.

By the end of the course, students will be expected to do the following:

Understand defined terms, axioms, postulates, and theories.
Apply rules of formal logic and construct proofs in two-column format.
Know how to solve for angles given parallels, perpendiculars, and transversals.
Demonstrate how to solve for sides and angles of triangles, quadrilaterals, and polygons.
Understand trigonometric ratios and know how to use them to solve for unknown sides and angles in given triangles as well as application word problems.
Be able to determine arcs, chords, and sectors of circles.
Calculate perimeter, area, and volume of figures and solids.
Graph lines and determine slopes, midpoints, and distances.
Interpret and construct the graphs and equations of quadratic functions.
Make geometric constructions on paper.
Represent results of motion geometry (translation, rotation, reflection, dilation).
Calculate simple probabilities using addition, multiplication, permutations, combinations, and frequency tables.
10Y
Pre-CalculusMathPre-calculus - Common Core (2444) is a full-year, high school credit course that is intended for the student who has successfully mastered the core algebraic and conceptual geometric concepts covered in the prerequisite courses: Integrated Math I-III – Common Core. The course primarily focuses on the skills and methods of analytic geometry and trigonometry while investigating further relationships in functions, quadratics, probability, and number theory.

Upon successfully completing the course, the student should have mastered the following concepts:

Use the unit circle to extend the domain of trigonometric functions to include all real numbers.
Develop understanding of the radian measure of an angle, graph trigonometric functions, derive and apply the Pythagorean identity.
Create inverses of trigonometric functions and use the inverse functions to solve trigonometric equations that arise in real-world problems.
Apply trigonometry to general triangles, derive the trigonometric formula for the area of a triangle and use the Laws of Sines and Cosines to solve problems.
Prove and use addition, subtraction, double, and half-angle formulas to solve problems.
Perform operations on matrices, use matrices in applications, and use matrices to represent and solve systems of equations.
Derive equations of conic sections (parabolas, ellipses, and hyperbolas) and solve systems of a linear and quadratic equation in two variables.
Apply understanding of complex numbers and their operations through graphical representations.
Perform operations on vectors and use the operations to represent various quantities.
Extend study of probability by computing and interpreting probabilities of compound events.
Calculate expected values and use them to solve problems and make informed decisions.
10Y
TrigonometryMathTrigonometry is a five-unit elective course for high school students who have successfully completed Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II. The materials cover a development of trigonometry from right triangle trigonometry to oblique triangles and the polar plane. Throughout the course, students will develop trigonometric formulas and use them in real-world applications, evaluate trigonometric proofs using complex trigonometric identities and solving trigonometric equations with regard to the unit circle.

The course seeks to help students expand their knowledge and skills so that they may achieve the following goals:

Use trigonometry as a tool for indirect measurement.
Model natural phenomenon with trigonometric functions.
Perform operations with complex numbers using trigonometry.
Use trigonometric identities to evaluate trigonometric proofs and solve trigonometric equations with regard to the unit circle.
Solve for unknown sides and angles of right and oblique triangles using right triangle trigonometry, law of sines and law of cosines.
In attaining these goals, students will begin to see the "big picture" of mathematics and understand how numeric, algebraic, and geometric concepts are woven together to build a foundation for higher mathematical thinking.
10Y
Algebra I FundamentalsMathAlgebra I Fundamentals is a full year, high school credit course that is intended for the student who has successfully mastered the core algebraic concepts covered in the prerequisite course, Pre-Algebra. Within the Algebra I course, the student will explore basic algebraic fundamentals such as evaluating, creating, solving and graphing linear, quadratic, and polynomial functions.

Upon successfully completing the course, the student should have mastered the following concepts:

Solve single variable, absolute value, and linear systems of equations.
Solve and graph single variable, absolute value, and linear inequalities.
Evaluate, solve, and graph linear and quadratic functions as well as conceptualize the relationship between the independent and dependent variable of a function.
Understand and know how to apply the distance, midpoint, and slope formulas as well as the Pythagorean theorem.
Form an equation of a line using the slope-intercept, point-slope and standard forms of a line.
Organize data in the form of a table or matrix; perform complex matrix operations such as multiplication, evaluating the determinant, and solving a system of linear equations using Cramer's Rule.
Apply basic fundamental rules of exponents.
Be able to construct a formula or equation necessary to solve algebraic word problems involving area, perimeter, and linear systems of equations, basic probability and statistical reasoning, distance, and compounding interest.
Evaluate rational expressions and solve equations with rational expressions.
Simplify and perform operations with radical expressions and polynomials.
10Y
Algebra II FundamentalsMathALGEBRA II FUNDAMENTALS
Algebra II Fundamentals is a full-year, high school math course intended for the student who has successfully completed the prerequisite course Algebra I. This course focuses on algebraic techniques and methods in order to develop student understanding of advanced number theory, concepts involving linear, quadratic and polynomial functions, and pre-calculus theories. This course also integrates geometric concepts and skills throughout the units, as well as introducing students to basic trigonometric identities and problem solving.

By the end of the course, students will be expected to do the following:

Understand set notation and the structure of mathematical systems.
Know how to use functional notation and operations on functions.
Simplify and solve algebraic fractions.
Perform operations on polynomials, including factoring, long division, and synthetic division.
Solve algebraic word problems involving mixtures, money, integers, and work.
Evaluate and solve radical expressions and equations.
Solve systems of equations with graphing, substitution, and matrices.
Graph and solve quadratic equations, including conic sections.
Graph and solve exponential and logarithmic equations.
Calculate permutations, combinations, and complex probabilities.
10Y
Consumer MathMathConsumer Math is an introduction to the many ways in which math can be used in everyday life. The course gives practical advice on how to handle situations that involve money and math principles. Consumer Math focuses on the basic skills and methods of arithmetic and provides students the opportunity to develop experience with algebraic techniques of evaluating variables and equations, including geometric formulas and interest equations. Students will also be introduced to topics in statistics.

Upon completion of the course, students should be able to do the following:

Use basic math operations on fractions, decimals, and percentages.
Interpret graphs and charts.
Understand sets and basic set theory.
Calculate simple probabilities.
Calculate statistical measures of variation.
Use similarity and right triangle ratios for indirect measurement.
Calculate taxes, discounts, and interest amounts.
Apply math to everyday concerns, as well as to the realms of business and government.
10N
Geometry FundamentalsMathGeometry Fundamentals is a full year, high school math course for the student who has successfully completed the prerequisite course, Algebra I. The course focuses on the skills and methods of linear, coordinate, and plane geometry. In it, students will gain solid experience with geometric calculations and coordinate plane graphing, methods of formal proof, and techniques of construction.

By the end of the course, students will be expected to do the following:

Understand defined terms, axioms, postulates, and theories.
Apply rules of formal logic and construct proofs in two-column format.
Know how to solve for angles given parallels, perpendiculars, and transversals.
Demonstrate how to solve for sides and angles of triangles, quadrilaterals, and polygons.
Understand trigonometric ratios and know how to use them to solve for unknown sides and angles in given triangles as well as application word problems.
Be able to determine arcs, chords, and sectors of circles.
Calculate perimeter, area, and volume of figures and solids.
Graph lines and determine slopes, midpoints, and distances.
Make geometric constructions on paper.
Represent results of motion geometry (translation, rotation, reflection, dilation).
10Y
Integrated Math I - Common CoreMathIntegrated Math I – Common Core is a full year, high school credit course that provides a deeper understanding of concepts from Algebra I along with application of geometric theorems and ideas. Within the Integrated Math I – Common Core course, students will create and solve simple expressions and equations, compare and analyze functions, solve linear equations with more than one variable, analyze and solve problems of triangles, and utilizing the coordinate system to explain geometric relationships and various line models.

By the end of the course, students will be expected to do the following:

Solve and graph single variable, absolute value, and linear equations and inequalities.
Solve linear, quadratic and exponential systems of equations using graphing, substitution or elimination.
Evaluate and solve quadratic equations and inequalities using graphing, factoring, quadratic formula, and completing the square.
Understand and know how to apply the distance, midpoint, and slope formulas as well as the Pythagorean Theorem.
Form an equation of a line using the slope-intercept, point-slope and standard forms of a line.
Apply basic fundamental rules of exponents.
Be able to construct a formula or equation necessary to solve algebraic word problems involving area, perimeter, and linear systems of equations, basic probability and statistical reasoning, distance, and compounding interest.
Evaluate rational expressions and solve equations with rational expressions.
Simplify and perform operations with radical expressions such as addition and subtraction, multiplication and division.
Perform operations with polynomials such as addition and subtraction, multiplication, long division and factoring.
Interpret and apply the relationship between the independent and dependent variable in a linear, exponential, and quadratic function through algebraic modeling and applications.
Interpret and analyze measures of central tendency, sample data and outcome, probability and frequency tables.
Know how to solve for angles given parallels, perpendiculars, and transversals.
Demonstrate how to solve for sides and angles of triangles, quadrilaterals, and polygons.
Graph lines and determine slopes, midpoints, and distances.
Interpret and construct the graphs and equations of quadratic functions.
Make geometric constructions on paper.
Represent results of motion geometry (translation, rotation, reflection, dilation).
10Y
Integrated Math II - Common CoreMathIntegrated Math II – Common Core is a full year, high school math course for the student who has successfully completed the prerequisite course, Integrated Math I – Common Core. The course includes concepts in Number and Quantity, Algebra, Functions, Modeling, Geometry, and Statistics and Probability. In it, students will gain solid experience with polynomials, quadratic functions, permutations and combinations, methods of formal proof, congruent figures, and trigonometric basics.

By the end of the course, students will be expected to do the following:

Graph and solve quadratic equations, including conic sections.
Solve linear, quadratic and exponential systems of equations using graphing, substitution, or elimination.
Perform operations with polynomials such as addition and subtraction, multiplication, and factoring.
Interpret and apply the relationship between the independent and dependent variable in a linear, exponential, and quadratic function through algebraic modeling and applications.
Understand defined terms, axioms, postulates, and theories.
Apply rules of formal logic and construct proofs in two-column format.
Understand trigonometric ratios and know how to use them to solve for unknown sides and angles in given triangles as well as application word problems.
Calculate perimeter, area, and volume of figures and solids.
Interpret and construct the graphs and equations of quadratic functions.
Represent results of motion geometry (translation, rotation, reflection, dilation).
Calculate simple and complex probabilities using addition, multiplication, permutations, combinations, and frequency tables.
State: California
Grade Level: 10
Category: Math
Course Length: Year
10Y
Integrated Math III - Common CoreMathIntegrated Math III – Common Core is a full year, high school math course for the student who has successfully completed the prerequisite course, Integrated Math II – Common Core. The course includes concepts in Number and Quantity, Algebra, Functions, Modeling, Geometry, and Statistics and Probability. Students will gain solid experience with polynomials and rational expressions; radical, exponential, and logarithmic equations and functions; statistics in real life; similar figures; and trigonometric measures.

By the end of the course, students will be expected to do the following:

Calculate and perform operations with real and imaginary numbers.
Simplify and solve algebraic fractions.
Perform operations on polynomials, including factoring, long division, and synthetic division.
Solve algebraic word problems involving mixtures, money, integers, and work.
Evaluate and solve radical expressions and equations.
Graph and solve radical, exponential, and logarithmic equations.
Explore trigonometric identities and functions using the Unit Circle, graphs, and modeling.
Interpret sample surveys, normal distributions and observational studies.
Make geometric constructions on paper.
Apply the Laws of Sine and Cosine to find measurements of different types of triangles.
Demonstrate how to solve for sides and angles of triangles, quadrilaterals, and polygons.
10Y

Science

Course
Course Type
Course Description
Credits
AG Acrrediated
BiologyScienceBiology is intended to expose students to the designs and patterns of living organisms and their interactions with the environment. In preceding years, students should have developed a foundational understanding of life sciences. Expanding on that, this Biology course will incorporate more abstract knowledge including the micro and macro aspects of life. The major concepts covered are taxonomy, the chemical basis of life, cellular structure and function, genetics, microbiology, plant structure and function, animal structure and function, and ecology and the environment.

Students at this level should show development in their understanding of scientific inquiry. The units contain experiments and projects that seek to develop a deeper conceptual meaning for students and that actively engage them. The continued exposure of science concepts and scientific inquiry will serve to improve the students' skills and understanding.

10Y
ChemistryScienceChemistry is intended to provide a more in-depth study of matter and its interactions. In preceding years students should have developed an understanding for the macroscopic properties of substances and been introduced to the microstructure of substances. This chemistry course will expand upon that knowledge, further develop the microstructure of substances, and teach the symbolic and mathematical world of formulas, equations, and symbols.

The major concepts covered are measurement in chemistry, atomic structure, chemical formulas and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gases, and chemical equilibrium. Students at this level should show development in their ability and understanding of scientific inquiry. The units contain experiments and projects that seek to develop a deeper conceptual meaning for the student and actively engage the student. The continued exposure of science concepts and scientific inquiry will serve to improve the student's skill and understanding.

Chemistry should be preceded by Integrated Mathematics II – Common Core and preceded or accompanied by Integrated Mathematics III – Common Core
10Y
Earth ScienceScienceEarth Science is a basic science course intended to further explore the designs and patterns of our planet. This course covers such areas as the origin, history, and structure of the earth. It also covers forces that cause change on the earth and features of the earth including the crust, water, atmosphere, weather, and climate. Earth Science wraps up with astronomy and a study of all the planets, the solar system, and galaxies. The course strives to teach that each feature of the earth interacts with the others in many critical ways, and the study of these relationships is important to humanity.

Students at this level should show development in their understanding of scientific inquiry. Some of the units contain experiments and projects that seek to develop meaning and to actively engage the student. The continued exposure to science concepts and scientific inquiry will serve to improve the students' skill and understanding.

Upon completion of the course, students should be able to do the following:

Gain increased awareness about where Earth came from, how Earth functions and sustains life, and how the many systems and processes of Earth rely on and balance one another.
Improve scientific evaluation skills and apply them to the study of Earth's physical geography and dynamic processes.
Discover tools that allow for the study of Earth and its further exploration.
10Y
Integrated Physics and ChemistryScienceIntegrated Physics and Chemistry is a physical science course designed for high school students needing an entry-level science course covering basic concepts found in chemistry and physics. Topics included in this study are:

matter,
motion and forces,
work and energy,
electricity and magnetism, and
waves.
Throughout the course, students will have opportunities to observe simulations, investigate ideas, and solve problems–both on screen and away from the computer.

The course seeks to help students expand their knowledge and skills so that they may achieve the following goals:

Gain an understanding of foundational concepts in physics and chemistry.
Make careful observations of the surrounding environment.
Analyze problems and solutions scientifically.
Integrate science knowledge with real world situations at local, regional, national, and international levels.
Appreciate the impact of science discovery on everyday life.
10Y
PhysicsSciencePhysics is intended to provide a more in-depth study of the physical universe. In preceding years students should have developed a basic understanding for the macroscopic and microscopic world of forces, motion, waves, light, and electricity. The physics course will expand upon that prior knowledge and further develop both. The curriculum will also seek to teach the symbolic and mathematical world of formulas and symbols used in physics. The major concepts covered are kinematics, forces and motion, work and energy, waves, sound and light, electricity and magnetism, and nuclear physics.

Students at this level should show development in their ability and understanding of scientific inquiry. The units contain experiments and projects that seek to develop a deeper conceptual meaning for students and actively engage them. The continued exposure to science concepts and scientific inquiry will serve to improve the students' skill and understanding.

Physics should be preceded by Integrated Mathematics I-III – Common Core.
10Y

Geography, Social Studies & History

Course
Course Type
Course Description
Credits
AG Acrrediated
EconomicsHistory & Social SciencesThis semester-long course is designed to provide students with a strong foundation of basic economic principles, with an emphasis on the free enterprise system and its benefits. Topics in this course include:

Scarcity
Supply and demand
The economic role of the federal government
The benefits of the free enterprise system
Different market structures
Market regulations
The macroeconomy
After completing the course, students should be able to answer a variety of economic questions and demonstrate a number of social studies skills.
5Y
Principals of American DemocracyHistory & Social SciencesThis semester-long course discusses types of governments, focusing on the American form of government. Throughout the course, students will learn about a variety of topics. Topics in this course include:

International governments
Philosophers that influenced the development of government
A history of government types
The rise of democracy
The structure and organization of the United States government
The importance of the U.S Constitution
The three branches of government
How bills become law
American political parties
Voting and elections
Citizenship and civic responsibilities
After completing the course, students should be able to answer a variety of questions relating to government and demonstrate a number of social studies skills.
5Y
UNITED STATES HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY: CONTINUITY AND CHANGE IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURYHistory & Social SciencesUnited States History and Geography: Continuity and Change in the Twentieth Century examines American history from the Reconstruction to the present day, placing special emphasis on the major political, economic, and social movements of the twentieth century. In addition, the first unit reviews important information and ideas about the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.

Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:

Explain the ideas of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.

Analyze the application of the Founding Fathers ideals to historical events.

Describe the goals and results of Reconstruction policies.

Describe conditions in the United States at the turn of the twentieth century, including the effects of industrialization, immigration, and urbanization.

Explain the factors influencing U.S. expansionism in the early twentieth century.

Describe the reform movements of the Progressive Era.

Summarize U.S. involvement in World War I.

Describe the causes of the Great Depression.

Explain the long-term effects of the New Deal on American society.

Identify the major events of World War II, including activities on the Homefront.

Identify the origins of the Cold War and U.S. efforts to contain the spread of Communism.

Summarize the goals of the civil rights, countercultural, and women's movements.

Describe U.S. foreign policy in the post-Cold War era.

Understand the key challenges facing American society in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.
10N
World GeographyHistory & Social SciencesWorld Geography takes students on a journey around the world in which they will learn about the physical and human geography of various regions. They will study the history of each region and examine the political, economic, and cultural characteristics of the world in which we live. Students will also learn about the tools and technologies of geography such as globes, maps, charts, and global information systems.

Upon completion of the course, students should be able to do the following:

Select and use geographic tools to get information and make predictions.
Compare places based upon their similarities and differences.
Identify geographic factors that influenced historic events.
Evaluate the interrelatedness and interdependence of physical and human systems and their impact on our earth.
Analyze the role played by culture in the spatial organization of the earth.
Define the key geographic concerns facing the world and strategize methods to deal with these issues in the future.
Students will also gain practice in writing and note-taking. They will be asked to create graphic organizers, conduct research, analyze information, and write essays on topics such as current events, energy resources, and national parks.
10Y
WORLD HISTORY, CULTURE, AND GEOGRAPHY: THE MODERN WORLDHistory & Social SciencesThroughout the course students will learn about a variety of topics. Topics in this course include:

The important reasons we study history
The early civilizations of the world
The important political and social ideals that originated in classical Greece and ancient Rome
The major religions that have developed throughout the world
The major empires throughout history
Interaction and exchange between the peoples of the world
Major political, cultural, and religious revolutions
The impact of world war and its repercussions
Important events of the 20th Century
10Y

Foreign Language

For credit foreign language courses are NCAA approved using the Middlebury curriculum listed here.

Course
Course Type
Course Description
Credit Value
HS Spanish IForeign LanguageHigh School Spanish I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to Spanish-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the Hispanic world. High School Spanish I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School Spanish I provides the foundation and path for continued learning.10
HS Spanish IIForeign LanguageHigh School Spanish II is the second level of high school Spanish designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts. They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate Spanish.10
HS French IForeign LanguageHigh School French I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to French-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the Francophone world. High School French I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School French I provides the foundation and path for continued learning.10
HS French IIForeign LanguageHigh School French II is the second level of high school French designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations and interactive activities. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts. They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate French.10
HS German IForeign LanguageHigh School German I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to German-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the German-speaking world. High School German I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School German I provides the foundation and path for continued learning.10
HS German IIForeign LanguageHigh School German II is the second level of high school German designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts. They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various German-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate German.10
HS Chinese IForeign LanguageHigh School Chinese I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to Chinese-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the Chinese-speaking world. Both Chinese characters and pinyin are presented together throughout the course and specific character practices are introduced after the first quarter. High School Chinese I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School Chinese I provides the foundation and path for continued learning.10
HS Chinese IIForeign LanguageHigh School Chinese II is the second level of high school Chinese designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Character recognition and practice are a key focus and students are expected to learn several characters in each unit; however, pinyin is still presented with characters throughout the course to aid in overall comprehension. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Chinese-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. By the second semester, instruction is almost entirely in Chinese. High School Chinese II is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate Chinese.10
HS Latin IForeign LanguageSince mastering a classical language presents different challenges from learning a spoken world language, students learn Latin through ancient, time honored, classical language approaches which include repetition, parsing, written composition, and listening exercises. These techniques, combined with a modern multimedia approach to learning grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, provide students with a strong foundation for learning Latin. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading comprehension activities, writing activities, multimedia culture, history, and mythology presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on engaging with authentic classical Latin through weekly encounters with ancient passages from such prestigious authors as Virgil, Ovid, and Lucretius. The curriculum concurs with the Cambridge school of Latin; therefore, students will learn ancient high classical styles of pronunciation and grammar in lieu of generally less sophisticated medieval styles, making it possible for students to comprehend the most Latin from the widest range of time periods. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, understand and analyze the cultural and historical contexts of the ancient sources they study, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).1
HS Latin IIForeign LanguageStudents continue with their study of Latin through ancient, timeh honored, classical language approaches which include repetition, parsing, written composition, and listening exercises. These techniques, combined with a modern multimedia approach to learning grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, prepare students for a deeper study of Latin. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading comprehension activities, writing activities, multimedia culture, history, and mythology presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. The emphasis is on reading Latin through engaging with myths from the ancient world which are presented in Latin. The curriculum concurs with the Cambridge school of Latin; therefore, students will learn ancient high classical styles of pronunciation and grammar in lieu of generally less sophisticated medieval styles, making it possible for students to comprehend the most Latin from the widest range of time periods. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, understand and use common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, understand and analyze the cultural and historical contexts of the ancient sources they study, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).1

Electives

Course
Course Type
Course Description
Credits
ACT Test PrepFine ArtsPreparation course for taking the ACT Testna
AGRIBUSINESS SYSTEMSElectiveAgribusiness Systems is a semester-length high school elective that introduces the business, management, marketing, and financial skills needed to successfully produce food, fiber, and fuel for domestic and global markets. Nearly 16 percent of total U.S. employment and 14 percent of the U.S. gross domestic product can be attributed to agribusiness systems, which means agriculture, food, and natural resources play a pivotal role in the economic success of our nation. Students will learn about the components of the agribusiness system and how they interact to deliver food to our tables. They will also learn about the key elements of a successful agribusiness enterprise: economics, financial management, marketing and sales, and government policies and regulations. Objectives • • • • • • • • • • Introduce the components of agribusiness systems. Explain key business and management principles and issues for the agribusiness enterprise. Present an overview of the knowledge and skills needed by agribusiness enterprises. Expose students to career opportunities in agribusiness. Analyze and interpret agricultural policies in relation to their effects on the agribusiness system and agribusiness enterprises. Understand the impact of green practices and sustainability principles on natural resources and how they affect food production. Recognize the need for accurate records and financial practices to maintain a successful agribusiness enterprise. Analyze budgets and forecasts to determine business strategies. Develop interpersonal and communication skills and critical thinking skills that are necessary for a successful career in the constantly changing agribusiness industry. Demonstrate an understanding of global markets, trade policies, and food security and safety issues that affect the agribusiness industry.0.5
ANIMAL SYSTEMSElectiveThe role of animals in civilization has an ancient history, and they are no less prominent in today’s society. For example, pigs were domesticated in China as long as 10,000 years ago and are still vital to our lifestyle today. But we know that pigs are also intelligent beings. What are their preferences for habitat and treatment, and what are their social and reproductive habits? Animals today are used for clothing, food, transportation, agriculture, herding, companionship, guide assistance, and crime fighting, and research continues to reveal new uses. As our scientific understanding of animal systems grows, so do our best practices, ethical considerations, and research applications. How mankind treats animals impacts their well- being and productivity. The course provides students with a wealth of information on livestock-management practices, animal husbandry, physiological systems, the latest scientific trends, and innovations in food production. Changes in practices, regulations, and legislation for animal welfare continue as new research provides solutions to medical, ethical, and practical concerns. The course reviews current topics, such as advancements in technology and research, and defines areas of discussion while maintaining focus on best-management practices. How the research translates to management practices is a vital area of study and discussion. Objectives • Understand the role of animal agriculture in society. • Examine and apply best-management practices in animal agriculture. • Compare animal welfare versus animal rights. • Evaluate and select superior animals to be used for reproductive purposes. • Investigate animal-performance data. • Explore careers in animal agriculture. • Study the environmental impact of animal management and production systems. This is an introductory course in animal systems at the high-school level. An interest in animal physiology, husbandry, livestock, veterinary practice, animal welfare, or food production would be desirable for students of the course. The information gained will be helpful in making educational decisions for undergraduate or graduate study. A student might use the knowledge gained from the course to further an interest in becoming a chef, a researcher, a doctor, a wildlife- management professional, or any number of applicable careers. No previous experience in or knowledge of these careers is required for the course. Some students will have more experiential knowledge of animals; however, hands-on experience is not a requirement. The course covers livestock anatomy, physiology, and reproductive systems, but medical knowledge is not required for the course. The ability to review online information, research topics independently, pursue hands-on projects, and create reports and presentations is required.0.5
Art HistoryFine ArtsArt History is a year-long elective designed to enable students to develop knowledge of the history and theory of art and the relationship between artist, artwork, and society. Students will research and critique periods, styles, and works of art from early civilizations through modern and contemporary art.0.5
Banking Services CareersElectiveThis course will focus on the specific skills related to banking and related services. In addition, you will explore career paths and the required training or higher education preparation necessary to obtain a career in banking and related services. Also, you will gain an understanding of the basic functions of customer transactions, cash drawer activity, check collection processes, and other customer service–related transactions. This course will also discuss how technology has changed the banking and related services industry. Finally, this course will provide an overview of the technical and people skills necessary to aid consumers with setting up an account, processing a loan, or establishing a business.0.5
BUSINESS COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS I-AComputer TechBCIS I-A is a high school elective that explores the use of technology in both business and personal situations. The course provides key knowledge and skills in the following areas: telecommunications technology desktop publishing technology presentation technology computer networks computer operating systems The course is intended to help students arrive at the following understandings: Effective communication skills and productive work habits can increase employees' success. Technology solutions can help employees be more productive and effective.0.5
BUSINESS COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS I-BComputer TechBCIS I-B is a high school elective that explores the use of technology in both business and personal situations. The course provides key knowledge and skills in the following areas: telecommunications technology desktop publishing technology presentation technology computer networks computer operating systems The course is intended to help students arrive at the following understandings: Effective communication skills and productive work habits can increase employees' success. Technology solutions can help employees be more productive and effective.0.5
BUSINESS LAWElectiveThis course is designed to provide students with the knowledge of some of the vital legal concepts that affect commerce and trade, after first gaining some familiarity with how laws are created and interpreted. Students will then be introduced to the types of businesses that can be created to engage in commerce as well as the contractual and liability considerations that can impact a business. Laws that affect how a business is regulated will also be reviewed, particularly the impact of administrative rules and regulations on a business. Global commerce and international agreements, treaties, organizations, and courts that can affect business will be discussed to get a better sense of what it means to0.5
Career ManagementElectiveCareer management is a semester-length high school elective course that assists students in their preparation for career selection. The course is designed to improve workforce skills needed in all careers including:

communication
leadership
teamwork
decision making
problem solving
goal setting
time management
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CAREERS IN ALLIED HEALTHElectiveAllied health is the term for the area of healthcare (and health care professions) that provide support and care services other than specific doctoring and nurse care. At times, the line between allied health and0.5
Careers in Logistics Planning and Management ServicesElectiveThis course discusses careers in Logistics Planning and Management Services, and provides students with the history of logistics and recent advances in the field. The history of logistics creates a foundation of knowledge to build our understanding of the social and economic benefits of modern logistics. Modern societies and economic development depend on the ability to transport products from their point of origin to store shelves and then into the hands of consumers. Current trends in logistics favor low‐cost methods, safety, technology, sustainability, and regulations to keep the goods flowing from their source to the consumers.

Packaging goods and materials for safe transport begins with knowing what is being handled. Goods that are intended for consumers have different packaging requirements than materials being shipped to manufacturers. Unitization makes it possible to move goods easily inside warehouse and distribution centers and between modes of transportation. Goods are often shipped through a combination of air, land, rail, and sea modes of transportation. When deciding which node to use, logistics managers consider the location, transportation plan, routing, convenience, security, and costs related to their node decision.

Managing inventory involves decision making and analysis to ensure the goods and materials flow through the logistics channels and supply chain properly. Inventory is an asset that the business carries to add revenues and profits. Identifying the need for goods and services is the first step in obtaining goods and services. Within the logistics process, many goods and services are obtained through a process of procurement. Space, time, and money are all important factors to consider when managing existing inventories and the need for future inventories.

Decision makers often look for a balance between the speed and the cost to ship goods. Documentation is needed to identify goods, enable tracking, indicate where the goods are from, and where they are being shipped. Liability for goods is common in all modes of shipping. Risk management identifies, analyzes, and evaluates elements of the business that can go wrong. These liabilities can be outside of the company’s control, but many can be prevented. Regulatory agencies create rules and regulations that are intended to protect the public from many risks. Risk management considers the potential for risk— insurance is one way to minimize the risk. Everyone who holds a financial interest in the goods, vehicles, and property wants to know they are protected, so they buy insurance.

Regulatory agencies work in cooperation with other agencies to minimize the risks and liabilities for employers and their employees. OSHA advises employers, their staff, labor unions, and industry leaders on what they can do to keep the workplace safe. They also inspect the workplace to ensure the employers are in compliance with OSHA standards. Logistics offers many career opportunities across seven career pathways. Logistics is a high growth industry, and is a stable career choice. There is something for every career‐seeker, ability, and experience level.

The objective of this course is to introduce the student to the field of logistics planning and management and to explain the career opportunities that are available in this field.

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Careers in Manufacturing ProcessesElectiveCareers in Manufacturing Processes concerns the manufacturing process, from the conception of a new product through the prototype stage to fabrication, assembly, testing, and customer satisfaction. Manufacturing is the beating heart of American enterprise. Indeed, it is the heart of the economy of any advanced industrialized nation. This course examines every aspect of the manufacturing process from strategy and management to factory‐floor tactics.0.5
Careers in Marketing ResearchElectiveMarketing research is the foundation of all marketing activities because it provides the data needed to make key strategic decisions about products, promotions, pricing, and other key organizational decisions. This course will provide information about the process of investigation and problem analysis by using research to produce key marketing statistics that are communicated to management and used throughout the organization. This course concludes with the execution, interpretation, and presentation of marketing research.

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Civil WarHistoryYou are about to embark on the fascinating history of the Civil War. It is a story of human choices that linked the past to the present and influenced the future. It is a drama of how one nation changed through times of conflict and cooperation. It is a tale of two children (the North and South) living under the same roof (The United States) and how they disagreed over the issues of states' rights and slavery. As you study the Civil War, you will detect patterns in the way people thought and acted. You will see familiar patterns in how battles were won and lost. You will also note how events happening today affect the future. The principle of cause and effect applies in everything you do. Even today, there are some people who believe the South won the Civil War or that the North had no right to abolish slavery. Others cannot believe that people from the South found nothing wrong with enslaving fellow human beings. For all these people, their view of history differs from one another based on their perspective. Regardless of where you stand, enjoy learning about this period in American history. It is filled with heroism and cowardness, conflict and cooperation, heartache and joy, triumph and tragedy. Hopefully, you will be able to apply the enduring understandings mentioned above to advance your understanding America.0.5
A/V Technology and Film CareersFine ArtsThis course discusses careers in audio/visual (AV) technology and film, and provides students with background about the required skills, education, equipment, and technology in this industry. Students will understand the collaborative team effort of many different professionals who make films, videos, audio, and TV programming. The course begins with an introduction to the history and development of AV technology and film, with subsequent units focusing on specific sectors of the industry and the stages for producing film and media. The concluding unit focuses on the finishing stages for exhibition, distribution, and reaching a market. In addition, the course will provide information about many different careers that are available to students who are interested in AV technology and film.0.5
Construction CareersElectiveThis course in Construction Technology introduces students to the basics of construction, building systems, engineering principles, urban planning, and sustainability. Students will learn the key techniques in building all types of buildings, as well as the key individuals involved in each step of the process. Many lessons present information on green building techniques and concepts that are becoming a standard part of the construction industry. Safety practices are emphasized in several lessons because construction is one of the most dangerous industries; students will learn that there is no way to be successful in construction without taking such issues seriously. Toward this end, the lessons also explore regulatory agencies and guidelines established for the purpose of protecting not only construction workers but also the occupants of a building.0.5
Consumer MathLiteracyConsumer Math is an introduction to the many ways in which math can be used in everyday life. The course gives practical advice on how to handle situations that involve money and math principles. Consumer Math focuses on the basic skills and methods of arithmetic and provides students the opportunity to develop experience with algebraic techniques of evaluating variables and equations, including geometric formulas and interest equations. Students will also be introduced to topics in statistics. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to do the following: Use basic math operations on fractions, decimals, and percentages. Interpret graphs and charts. Understand sets and basic set theory. Calculate simple probabilities. Calculate statistical measures of variation. Use similarity and right triangle ratios for indirect measurement. Calculate taxes, discounts, and interest amounts. Apply math to everyday concerns, as well as to the realms of business and government.0.5
CORRECTIONS: POLICIES AND PROCEDURESElectiveCorrections is one of the three branches of the Criminal Justice System (CJS) in the United States. All three branches employ personnel who are authorized to uphold and enforce the law, and are required to operate under the rule of law. Each branch works as part of the entire system to maintain the public safety and well-being, and bring criminals to justice. Corrections facilities and programs are run by a complex systems of policies and procedures, which uphold local, state, and federal laws. This course gives students an introductory, yet thorough view of many aspects of corrections operations. Students receive historical and legal background information as they study how prisons and prisoners have evolved into correctional facilities and programs for offenders. In this course the duties responsibilities, conduct, training, and special certification possibilities for corrections staff are explored. Many aspects of procedures in corrections are reviewed, giving students an in-depth look at what a variety of careers in this growing field encompass and require. Objectives • Analyze training and use of force reports. • Ascertain the value of effective communication in correctional settings. • Decipher concepts of the essentials of effective communication. • Deconstruct the principles of written communication and reports. • Differentiate effective communication skills for managing offenders with mental illness. • Evaluate the importance of following agency procedures for emergency response incidents. • Evaluate safety and security concepts for physical plants. • Evaluate the historical practices of offender management, control and incarceration. • Interpret aspects of legal uses of force and different levels of force, including deadly force. • Interpret concepts of computer forensic investigations. • Interpret prevention and cause of security breaches. • Interpret the critical constitutional rights of offenders in correctional setting (First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendments). • Interpret the major responsibilities of corrections. • Investigate the powers of agencies responsible for investigation and enforcing applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations. Corrections, and Correctional Policies and Procedures Course Requirements This is an introductory course in corrections. As such, there are no prerequisites for the student. An interest in the subject is expected, and online access to the research materials they will need to locate and review. The projects require mainly online research and presentation creation in PowerPoint, so Microsoft Office software or equivalent is required. There is some physical fieldwork in some projects, but virtual alternatives are proposed for those without access to the public facilities suggested. Personal skills in observation and recall, self-analysis, and experience assessment for communications skills are part of certain projects, and require some interaction with others, which any student should easily be able to complete. Students will be studying a wide range of corrections subjects. The course provides students interested in a career in corrections many opportunities for in-depth research into educational and career pathways that they use for their own advancement in the field.0.5
COUNSELING AND MENTAL HEALTH SERVICESElectiveThe mental health field is diverse. There are many different options available to those interested in working in the counseling and mental health field. This course introduces and exposes the students to some topics, issues, and populations that are related to the counseling and mental health field. Students will first receive information about on the history of the mental health system in the United States and about some common mental illnesses. They will then explore different counseling and mental health topics, populations, mental health needs of these populations, and work place settings. Some topics and populations discussed are addiction, dual diagnosis disorders, vulnerable children, different vulnerable populations, and mental health issues in the criminal justice system. Some workplace settings of counseling and mental health workers analyzed are the criminal justice system, school systems, acute psychiatric care settings, community mental health centers, and child protective services. This course will also introduce students to various careers in the mental health field. Some of the professions reviewed are, psychiatrists, psychologists, school counselors, social workers, social and human service assistants, dual diagnosis disorder counselors, recovery coaches, correctional counselors, forensic psychologists, crime victim advocates, geriatric psychiatrists, and recreational therapists. The roles, responsibilities, and duties of these workers along with the educational, licensure/certification, job outlook, and salaries of these professions are discussed. Lastly, the ethics and competencies important to these professions are presented. Students are provided with resources in order that they may be able to conduct online research of schools and credential requirements of their individual states. This course will equip students with information and resources on counseling and mental health careers, and the coursework will give students the opportunity to apply some of this knowledge in practical scenarios. Objectives • Describe and compare careers in counseling and mental health in terms of academic preparation, skill sets, licensing, employment potential, and continuing education. • Describe the professional behaviors and skills required for human service occupations. • Analyze the role of mental health workers in asensuring fair and ethical treatment for human service clients. • Evaluate consequences of unethical behavior for both the clients and human service workers. • Identify personal qualities necessary for success in the field of counseling and mental health. • Demonstrate basic oral communications skills involved in interviewing and working with clients in a human services setting. • Demonstrate the ability to present information to various groups and audiences using appropriate technology. • Produce written documents of professional quality appropriate to the purpose of the communication and intended receiver. • Recognize the importance of inter- professional team work and communication in the human service arena. • Recognize the role that social problems play in the development of various mental and or behavior disorders. • Identify mental health models used by mental health workers to assist them in understanding client problems. • Describe selected interventions used by mental health professionals. • Recognize different work environments of mental health workers. The Student should understand the following concepts about the counseling field: • A mental health system exists in the United States. • Basic understanding of the educational system in the United States. • Understand that the goal of mental health careers is to help others. • School counselors, therapists, social workers, and psychiatrists are some professionals who work in the mental health field. To be successful in this course, the student should be comfortable with these technical expectations: • • • • • • Access and navigate the Internet. Access teachertube.com. Use word processor (Microsoft Word, Word Perfect, etc.). Create PowerPoint Presentations. Post to Discussion Thread. Create a Timeline0.5
Digital ArtsFine ArtsDigital Arts is a semester-long elective designed to provide computer science students with an introduction to visualization-graphics programming on computers. To equip students for today’s digitally driven lifestyle, this course focuses on using a digital camera and the practical application of digital imaging and editing programs. Additionally, students will work with audio-editing programs, and will also examine 3D technology and cinematography. Throughout the course, students may be asked to answer questions or to reflect on what they’ve read in their notes. The notes are not graded. Rather, they are a way for students to extend their thinking about the lesson content. Students may keep handwritten or typed notes.0.5
EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT AND SERVICESElectiveEarly Childhood Development (ECD) is an introductory course offering a detailed overview of both developmental stages and areas of early childhood, and how early childhood education professionals provide optimal assistance during these important years of growth and learning. An examination of the history, theories, teaching models, research, and policies that grew with the advance of early childhood education, as well as an introduction to the achievements of many leaders in this field, provide students a thorough grounding in the science and practice of early childhood education. This course further provides students with keen insight into why these years are so important to the life of the child, what areas of physical, emotional, and cognitive development are manifested from birth through age five, and what developmentally appropriate practices are proving to be most effective. Students will see how state, county, and community programs and non-profit social service organizations benefit from a combination of contributions and regional and federal funding mandated through national legislation; students will also appreciate the role ECE professionals play in their work with families, organizations, and licensing administrators. Students will be able to identify the advances, the challenges, the results, and the trends in ECE, explore a wide spectrum of professional possibilities, and learn the requirements and responsibilities of those positions. The complex interaction of state and federal policymaking on program funding and availability is covered in depth, as are codes of ethics and legislation affecting the quality of preschool and kindergarten programs. Diversity is a key topic, and inclusion of families and children of cultural, economic, linguistic, and ethnic and ability diverse backgrounds are covered in depth. The rights, programs, and services available for children with disabilities and their families are reviewed. As the areas of study show, the need for highly qualified, engaged professionals in preschool classrooms, child care centers, and school readiness programs is growing. Teachers and other professionals in the field need to be not only educated in ECD, but also adept at building positive relationships between teacher and child and parent and colleagues, with the sensitivity to, enthusiasm for, and awareness of diversity issues and developmentally appropriate practices requiring skill and ongoing training. Through creative projects in each unit, leading to completion of the capstone project, students become the professionals they are studying to be, hypothetically designing preschool curricula, counseling parents and working with infants with disabilities in mental health home intervention visits, researching credentials and education pathways for careers, investigating state funding and licensure requirements for programs, and getting involved in advocacy for major issues in the field. This course prepares students to make more informed decisions about their education and career pathway possibilities, endowing them with a solid understanding of the field and its importance in the well-being and success of not just a few young children and their families but of society and future generations. Objectives • Compare and contrast careers in early childhood development with regard to scope, academic preparation, certification, skill set, roles and responsibilities, and continuing education. • Identify the historical, cultural, and social foundations of early childhood development and the related services. • Describe agencies and organizations that support the profession of early childhood education and development. • Recognize milestones of typical development in young children. • Identify communication and problem-solving skills necessary to develop best practices in the field for young children and their families. • Examine ethical and legal implications of working with young children and their families. This is an introductory course in early childhood development (ECD) and early childhood education (ECE); there are no prerequisites. Students enrolled in the course are assumed to be interested in ECD and ECE and possibly considering a career as an ECE professional. The course offers a wealth of information on many aspects of the field, including education, credentialing, licensing, and endorsement area requirements for various positions.0.5
ENGINEERING AND DESIGNElectiveEngineering and Design is part of the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) education and career path. By building real-world problem-solving and critical thinking skills, students learn how to innovate and design new products and improve existing products. Students are introduced to the engineering design process to build new products and to the reverse engineering process, which enables engineers to adjust any existing product. Students will also address how fluid power is used by engineers to make difficult maneuvers easier, increasing efficiency and minimizing effects on the environment. Students then identify how engineering and design have a direct impact on the sustainability of our environment and the greening of our economy. Finally, students incorporate the engineering design process, environmental life cycle, and green engineering principles to create a decision matrix to learn how to solve environmental issues. Objectives • Understand the basic STEM requirements of engineers and the skills required for the occupation. • Define and understand how forces are transmitted with fluid systems to build efficiency and increase sustainability. With this knowledge, students can solve a problem with a new design solution using fluid power. • Utilize sketching skills and techniques to produce detailed sketches of components in the design of a real- world object to scale. This allows students to determine the feasibility of a product or design. • Use the engineering design process and reverse engineering techniques and apply them to a design. They will be able to create and use decision matrices to make design decisions based on logic and analysis. Students will be able to identify and research environmental issues and challenges with respect to energy and air quality. • Identify and analyze the environmental life cycle of a product or process to solve sustainability challenges for social and industrial environmental issues. It is helpful if students are familiar with renewable and nonrenewable resources. Many of the principles discussed in this course can be better addressed through the use of broken machines, toys, and electronics. Collection of these materials prior to the course will greatly help the student in the course0.5
ENGINEERING AND INNOVATIONElectiveThe Engineering and Innovation course will provide students with an understanding of the field of engineering and introduction to the concepts of invention and innovation, as well as some of the skills and tools necessary to invent and innovate. This information will provide students with the ability to invent and innovate in their field of choice. Students will learn details about the scope and nature of the field of engineering. They will also learn about the history of invention and innovation and how those activities play a role in the advancement of human society. Students will be introduced to patents, regulations, and ethical and professional standards that apply in the fields of engineering and invention. Students will also learn about analytical modeling and problem solving, interpreting the results of models and experiments, and understanding how bias impacts outcomes. In addition, students will learn about innovations and inventions in the fields of biomedicine and the environment and how those fields have impacted the health and well being of society. Lastly, students will learn about career choices and organizations and resources available for individuals who wish to incorporate invention and innovation into their careers and lives. Objectives • Understand the field of engineering as well as the concepts of invention and innovation. • Understand the history of inventions and innovations and compare and contrast the roles of innovators, inventors, and engineers. • Understand the changes that inventions have brought to society and how engineers and inventors collaborate with business. • Understand how to search and apply for patents, find regulations, and research ethical and professional standards that apply in the fields of engineering and innovation. • Understand the process of invention as problem solving, including using and interpreting models, and apply a model to a problem to solve it. • Understand problem solving and innovation specifically in the fields of biomedicine and the environment. • Identify career options and resources in interest areas, as well as understand how to bring a product or idea to market. For topics in this course, it is helpful for students to be familiar with general concepts of the world of business as well as the basics of conducting research on websites. If students are unfamiliar with these topics, it is recommended that they familiarize themselves with conducting online searches for business-related topics on the Internet by visiting sites such as Business.USA.gov or business magazine websites such as Forbes.com or BusinessWeek.com. These websites will provide an introduction to what is currently happening in the business world as well as give students an opportunity to practice navigating websites.0.5
ENGINEERING AND PRODUCT DEVELOPMENTElectiveEngineers address society’s needs and problems by designing and producing products and services. The field is diverse and includes professionals who design skyscrapers, design machinery, oversee public works, and develop software and systems. The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the concepts of product engineering and development. Students will analyze the life cycle of a product to prepare a product for distribution and for target markets. The course begins with building an understanding of the product life cycle, from the initial idea to drafting requirements to using 3-D modeling tools and other design tools. The final unit focuses on assembling the pieces for a project plan for a product and evaluating the plans for a successful product launch. In addition, the course will provide information about the different careers available to students interested in engineering, product development, and project management. Objectives • Understand the field of engineering design and product development, as well as economic and project management concepts. • Recognize the complex variables that need to be planned and coordinated as part of the product development life cycle. They will be able to summarize the challenges and issues facing engineers who prepare products and services for target markets and clients. • Develop ideas for overcoming challenges and issues related to engineering and product development and identify different career paths related to engineering and project management. Students will analyze product development life cycle management and discuss the role of data and human resources. • Identify best practices for project management in engineering and strategies for building successful projects that utilize communication and critical thinking skills required for addressing complex problems. Students will evaluate and critique multiple perspectives and multiple vested interests involved in engineering project management and product development. For topics in this course, it is helpful for students to be familiar with general concepts about engineering, as well as the basics of accessing IT tools and resources for conducting research on Web sites. If students are not familiar with these topics, it is important for them and product development.0.5
Environmental ScienceLab ScienceEnvironmental Science is an interdisciplinary course covering a wide variety of topics including biology, physics, geology, ecology, chemistry, geography, astronomy, meteorology, oceanography, and engineering. The course also considers ways in which human populations affect our planet and its processes. Of special emphasis is the concept of sustainability as a means of using resources in a way that ensures they will always be around us. The unifying concepts that tie the different areas of environmental science together are as follows: Science provides a way to learn more about the world and influences how we understand it. Energy conversions underlie all ecological processes. The Earth is one interconnected system. Humans change natural systems. Environmental issues have a cultural and social context. Human existence depends in part on increasing practices that will achieve sustainability. Students at this level should show development in their understanding of scientific inquiry. The course provides hands on labs and research to aid in arriving at a deeper understanding of the environment and the impact of humans on it today and in the past. The labs will call upon students to analyze many different processes and systems, arrive at conclusions, and determine ways in which every person can positively influence the environment.1
ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICE SYSTEMSElectiveThis semester-length, high school elective introduces students to career opportunities and educational pathways in a wide array of environmental fields. Students examine environmental legislation and regulations, government agencies and organizations, monitoring and testing methods and requirements. They discover the relationship between environmental regulations and careers, and study the issues, history, and current status of air and water quality, soil and atmospheric conditions. In an environmentally challenged world, ESS professionals are critically important. Job outlooks and salary scales reflect this need for educated, dedicated researchers, scientists, engineers, etc. Objectives • Compare and contrast careers in environmental service systems in terms of scope, academic preparation, employment potential, and career demands. • Evaluate environmental-related issues with air, waste, water, and disposal. • Explain how individuals can impact the environment in a positive manner and educate others about environmental issues. • Articulate the science and technologies surrounding air, ecosystems, waste cleanup, toxics, and water. • Identify sustainable practices and form a deeper understanding to balance the environment, society, and the economy. • Describe laws and regulations impacting environmental service systems. • Identify key laboratory and analytical instrumentation used for environmental monitoring. • Discuss methods for improvement of analytical results. • Recognize weather systems and weather patterns using meteorological principles and knowledge. • Describe soil compositions and properties to demonstrate knowledge of soil science. • Apply chemistry principles to environmental service systems. • Evaluate wastewater treatment and compliance with regulations. • Identify health risks associated with hazardous materials. • Identify methods of conventional and alternative energy sources. This is an introductory course in environmental service systems. The student needs to be interested in this field as a possible career, have computer and online access, and some experience with computer searches. Some students or student groups may have already done some field testing, such as simple pH water tests at home or in a stream. Some may have, or have access to, testing equipment and transportation to sites for testing projects, field trips to wastewater treatment plants, etc. The lesson projects are written so that students with access to labs, transportation, and equipment can use them, while those who do not can perform virtual testing. Students may be familiar with 2D and 3D computer modeling, and have access to such programs. These are not required, but are applicable to the course study.0.5
ESSENTIALS OF BUSINESSElectiveThis semester-long course is an introduction to the goals, processes, and operations of business enterprises for students. The main focus is on the functions that a company – whether a multinational corporation or a corner grocery store – must manage effectively to be successful. These include accounting, finance, human resource management, marketing, operations management, and strategic planning. Attention is also given to the legal environment in which businesses operate, and the importance of business ethics and corporate citizenship. Throughout the course, students may be asked to answer questions or to reflect on what they’ve read in their notes. The notes are not graded. Rather, they are a way for students to extend their thinking about the lesson content. Students may keep handwritten or typed notes. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to do the following: Apply business concepts to their lives Compare and contrast market economies with controlled economy Describe the six areas of human resource management List and define the legal forms of business ownership Name and describe the components of successful business communication Analyze ways in which technology is changing business operations0.5
Essentials of CommunicationElectiveEssentials of Communication: A Guide to Interacting Effectively in Today's World™ is a five-unit elective course for high school students. The materials cover fundamentals of the communication process important for successful interaction in a variety of social and professional settings. Students can use the course to gain and apply knowledge about communication theories, characteristics of language and language use, interpersonal relationships, group dynamics, and public speaking in order to interact more effectively with others. The course seeks to help students expand their knowledge and skills as communicators so that they may achieve the following goals: Know and understand aspects of communication theories and processes appropriate to both social and professional settings. Use interpersonal communication strategies appropriately in social and professional settings. Effectively communicate in social and professional group settings. Plan, prepare, deliver, and evaluate formal and informal personal and professional presentations. In attaining these goals, students will be better equipped to use communication to hone other life skills, including exchanging information, fulfilling social obligations, developing relationships, and understanding and meeting the needs of others.0.5
FAMILY AND COMMUNITY SERVICESElectiveThis course introduces applications within professions related to Family and Community Services. You will identify degree and credential requirements for occupations in this pathway and identify individual, social, historical, economic, and cultural context to increase awareness of family and community services. You will develop the abilities necessary to evaluate and identify a range of effective communication strategies and skills for establishing a collaborative relationship with others. You will also complete a variety of projects to apply your skills and knowledge. The course begins by introducing you to Family and Community Services, associated careers, and general requirements. The first unit requires you to investigate the skills required for many professions, including effective communication and critical thinking. The remaining units are divided among career fields. Each chapter begins with a lesson that discusses the general role of the professionals, their required skills and knowledge, educational requirements, employment opportunities, and salaries. The following lessons in each chapter then discuss various aspects of the career in greater detail. Objectives • Analyze careers in Family and Community Services in terms of employment opportunities, salary levels, education requirements, necessary skills, certification requirements, entrepreneurial opportunities, and employment outlook. • Understand the importance of exhibiting ethical responsibilities and encourage co-workers to comply ethical and legal responsibilities in the work place. • Be able to clearly articulate organizational policies, rules, and procedures. • Analyze needs, accommodations, and living conditions of families with various disadvantaging conditions and analyze situations that require crisis intervention. • Be familiar with effective family advocacy strategies and the rights and responsibilities of the clients and families. • Understand the ethical, legal, and safety issues related to positions in social work. • Research and evaluate local, state, and national agencies that provide support for family and consumer services agencies such as health care, Medicare, food stamps, and child care. • Analyze community-networking opportunities in Family and Community Services. • Guide individuals through the process of recognizing concerns and making informed decisions. There are no specific requirements for taking and succeeding in this course. This is a foundation course on family and community services that provides an overview of family and community systems and the professionals who serve and support them. Certain educational requirements and minimum experience or training are necessary for many careers. Higher pay in an occupation usually occurs with increased time spent at work, education, training, responsibilities, and experience. Different skills and education levels are required for different jobs. All careers have benefits and drawbacks, dependent on their pay, rewards, and stresses.0.5
FIRE AND EMERGENCY SERVICESElectiveEmergency and fire-management services are essential infrastructure components of a community. They provide a resource for dealing with numerous types of emergencies, including fires, motor vehicle, and industrial accidents, and medical emergencies. In addition, these services provide fire prevention and community-outreach programs. This course provides students with the basic structure of these organizations as well as the rules and guidelines that govern pre-employment education requirements. The vehicles, equipment, and emergency-mitigations strategies that are commonly used in the emergency- and fire-management field are also explored. Students will understand the goals of an emergency-management service and how they are implemented and managed, including personnel, budget, and labor-management challenges in the organization. Finally, the course also provides students with an overview of large-scale emergency incidents that overwhelm local agencies. Various preparedness plans are discussed. In the end, students will have been exposed to the typical characteristics and framework of modern emergency- and fire-management organizations and will have a better understanding of a career in this field. Objectives • Summarize the hierarchy of an emergency and fire-management system. • List the educational and work-experience requirements for entry-level positions in the EMS or fire systems. • Predict the pathway of authority between the various levels within an emergency and fire-service organization when orders are given. • Identify common geographical areas where fire apparatus are located. • Predict which apparatus is most appropriate to send for five different emergency situations. • Explain how target hazards need to be identified and considered in emergency-response plans. • Identify the unique functions of special-operations firefighting and emergency-medical operations. • Given a specific hazardous industry, predict what regulations and apparatus would be required for emergency protection for those locations. • Determine the required steps in the command sequence. • Given an emergency scenario, create the basic outline of an appropriate action plan. • Analyze a scenario to determine the most appropriate strategic concept for the situation. • Identify common apparatus and crew specialization. • List the technical abilities a crew member on an apparatus must possess in order to fulfill the mission. • Discuss the pieces of information shared in an initial incident report. • Describe how an incident manager chooses which apparatus to deploy to accomplish various missions. • List four areas of diversification that typical emergency-management agencies perform. • Identify the types of emergency services a local fire department has available. • Predict how a population shift away from a big city into an outlying town, or vice versa, would alter the demands placed on an emergency organization. • Discuss challenges and benefits associated with workforce diversity changes. • Analyze the methods the departments use to maintain and boost morale among the ranks. • Defend why an emergency-management agency would institute the customer service model into its operations. • Explain what the phrase “do more with less” means, and describe three changes an agency would make to enact this idea. • Describe two ways that a local government would impact the operations of an emergency agency. • Explore the concept of bargaining by organized labor in the operation of an emergency agency. • Describe different types of disasters, as well as their trends and consequences on communities. • Outline the disaster cycle of preparedness, response, reconstruction, and mitigation. • Predict the methods responders would utilize to address the complications encountered during a disaster. • Describe methods used to train and practice emergency management. • Explain what the National Incident Management System (NIMS) is and how it is used in emergency incidents. • Identify federal agencies that regulate modes of transportation in the United States. • • • Computer and Internet access Access to local or community fire departments Video camera is preferred, but not required0.5
FOOD AND BEVERAGE MANAGEMENTElectiveThis course, an introductory Food & Beverage Management course, is designed as an overview to prepare students for F&B core courses and to introduce them to specialty areas. Students will learn the basics of food service management and operations with an emphasis on the fundamental values of hospitality and responsible management. We will examine where the industry began, current best practices, and future trends. Students will gain knowledge of and understand how the correct blend of hard skills (food and beverage management principles) and soft skills (providing exceptional guest service) can maximize profits in the hospitality industry. Additional topics will include menu planning and pricing, types of service styles, food and beverage marketing, facility design and layout, financial controls, sanitation, safety, ethics, and legal concerns. We will also identify opportunities and career paths for those interested in the food & beverage industry. Objectives • Improve written, verbal, and presentation skills • Describe the types of food service facilities • Identify different settings of food service operations • Compare and contrast commercial vs. institutional food service operations • Identify management positions, production and service personnel, organizational charts, and career paths • Understand the fundamentals of management as they pertain to food service • Understand the basics of the science of nutrition and contemporary dietary concerns, and multicultural/diversity issues of food service • Outline the steps to menu pricing, schedules, planning, and design • Develop a standardized recipe • Focus on the importance of purchasing, receiving, storage and issuing • Describe the methods of preparation and production • Describe the types of service and income control procedures • Consider ethical and legal standards related to food and beverage management • Identify the types and uses of foodservice equipment and utensils • Identify the economic aspects of food service operations including the uniform system of accounts, financial statements, and ratio analysis • Be familiar with food service automation, hardware, and software • Realize the importance of sanitation including foodborne illness, personal cleanliness and health procedure for safe food handling, cleanup, and accident prevention • Identify trends in the food and beverage industry tudents must be computer literate and have Internet access. Students should have basic research skills, as well as the ability to conduct online searches and access recommended websites. Word processing and presentation software is required to produce projects. The following textbooks have been used as a basis for the entire course and while the student is not required to purchase them, if they would like to have more in depth knowledge of the topic, the following information will be useful. Management of Food and Beverage Operations ©2010, 13 chapters, Softbound ISBN 978-0-86612-344 Author: Jack D. Ninemeier Publisher: American Hotel & Lodging Association Managing Service in Food and Beverage Operations ©2012, 15 chapters, Softbound ISBN 978-0-86612-358-7 Authors: Ronald F. Cichy and Philip J. Hickey, Jr. Publisher: American Hotel & Lodging Association0.5
FOOD PRODUCTS AND PROCESSING SYSTEMSElectiveAgriculture, food, and natural resources (AFNR) are central to human survival and civilization. Mankind’s development, use, and stewardship of natural resources to create food products have a long and ever-changing timeline. This course explores the history and evolution of food products, along with the processing methods that have arisen to feed an ever- growing world population. Students study specifics in a wide spectrum of food product topics, from early methods of preservation to technological advancements in packaging, regulations in labeling, and marketing trends. The course prepares students for a variety of possible educational and career pathways in the food industry. Students learn industry terminology in each area of the overall system, from “farm to fork” to vertical integration to smart packaging. Food product systems include global and local marketing of whole and processed foods. The course investigates the economic, environmental, and nutritional benefits of the food students are eating in a series of hands-on projects that supplement the studies and assessments. Health concerns and best practices in quality assurance, inspections, and labeling are reviewed. Students learn how dietary guidelines are made and how they change with the latest research. Students track their own food intake and dietary ratios and research ingredients, processing procedures, and safe handling practices to increase their consumer awareness of food products. Advertising, marketing, product testing, and distribution of food products comprise a huge sector of food product systems and careers. The course prepares students for further research and work experience in these lucrative fields. Objectives • Apply the understanding of science and technology in the advanced production of food products and processing systems. • Understand the difference between food safety, food security, and food quality. • Analyze food production and environmental and sanitation policies and regulations related to food production and AFNR systems. • Recognize consumer factors and the consumer’s influence on the food products and the processing system in the development of food products. • Understand the balance between local and global production of food products. • Demonstrate an understanding of how natural resources and new sustainable production practices are influencing food products and the processing system. • Understand how the food products and processing system complements other AFNR production systems. • Analyze the changing industry structure and how the food production supply chain has evolved into its current state. This is an introductory course in food products and processing systems. As such, there are no prerequisites for the student. An interest in the subject is expected. The projects require food journals, access to the pantry, trips to the produce market and grocery store, and interviews with professionals in the food industry, including dietitians and nutritionists. Students will be reading nutritional panels on packed foods, measuring and weighing portion sizes, calculating sugar consumption, and researching ingredients in the projects as well. They must be able to research independently, “do the math” with a calculator or equivalent, take careful notes, and keep accurate notebooks and journals as part of the course.0.5
FOOD SAFETY AND SANITATIONElectiveThis comprehensive course will cover the principles and practices of food safety and sanitation that are essential in the hospitality industry for the protection and well-being of staff, guests and customers. The course will provide a systems approach to sanitation risk management and the prevention of food contamination by emphasizing the key components of the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) food safety system. After successful completion of this course, students will be prepared to meet the requirements of state and national certification exams. Course Objectives • to recognize the reasons for managing a sanitary foodservice operation • to understand the root causes of food borne illness and the prevention strategies that minimize the risk of food borne illness • to apply an effective food safety management program to meet the demands of consumers • to be provided with the necessary food safety knowledge required to successfully secure national certification in food safety management This course requires that the student: • • • • have access to the Internet for external readings be able to visit or contact various foodservice establishments for projects have access to digital camera should purchase a bimetallic stemmed thermometer0.5
FORENSICS: USING SCIENCE TO SOLVE A MYSTERYElectiveThis course is the overview of modern-day forensic science careers at work using science concepts to collect and analyze evidence and link evidence to the crime and suspects in order to present admissible evidence in courts of law. Modern-day forensic science practices have come into being thanks to the contribution of science and legal professions seeking ways to study crime scenes and criminal activities in an effort to stop crime. Of particular interest in this course are the various applications of medicine in the field of forensic science. This course identifies science concepts and critical thinking in the area of forensic science. Following the presentation of the concepts, students are encouraged to conduct online research exploring examples and applying the concepts just learned. Links to case studies and interactive learning tools are supplied along with high-quality research sites. Projects are assigned throughout the course that allow students to actively apply the information just learned. These projects include simulated crime-scene investigation, actual DNA separation, development of a cyber security plan, and the identification of specific forensic skills used during the course of a very large murder case. The focus of this course is to assist students in making career choices. Secondary school students who complete this course will have gained an awareness of the diversity of careers available in the forensic field. In addition, attention is drawn to many similar careers in medicine and computer science. Included in this overview of careers is the consideration of job descriptions and availability, educational and training requirements, licensing and certification, and typical annual salaries. Students who take this class will become equipped to make more informed career choices in regards to the forensic and medical science fields. At the same time, students will survey the history and scope of present-day forensic science work. In this course, students will fulfill the following objectives: • Compare and contrast the professions in the field of forensic science in terms of job descriptions, educational and training requirements, licensing and certification, and legal and ethical considerations. • Examine the history of forensic science and the contributions of physical evidence, fingerprints, ballistics, animation, and molecular techniques in solving crimes and identifying victims and perpetrators. • Assess the contributions of medical professionals in the development of forensics as a science. There is a great deal of research and related online study incorporated into this course. The student will be at a great disadvantage if the suggested work is not completed. It is recommended that the student have successfully completed a secondary-level course in biology and have a good background in physical science. An updated computer system including a good firewall as well as popup and virus protection is highly recommended. The following are the technology recommendations: • • • • high-speed Internet and functional sound system a presentation software program such as PowerPoint aupdated word-processing capabilities a good firewall and anti-virus protection0.5
FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPUTER SYSTEMSComputer TechThe Computer Fundamentals course will provide students with an understanding of computers and how they operate as well as a basic understanding of how to manage and maintain computers and computer systems. These skills will provide students with the ability to configure computers and solve computer problems. Students will learn details about the different elements of computers and computer systems. They will learn to identify hardware devices and their functions. They will be instructed on the role of operating systems as well as how to install and customize the Windows operating system. Students will learn about networking and the Internet. They will also be introduced to security issues in order to protect themselves and their computers and data. Students will also learn about some of the software applications typically used on computers today, such as Microsoft Office. In addition, students will learn specifics about maintaining and troubleshooting computers, including managing files, backing up systems, and using the administrative tools in the Windows operating system. Lastly, the students will learn the basics of customer service and working as a help desk support technician. Objectives • After completing this course the student will understand computers and their functions, as well as develop basic customer service skills, and be able to effectively meet customer needs. • Students will be able to implement problem-solving techniques to understand the nature of computer problems. They will also understand hardware components, software, and the Internet, so they are able to develop, maintain, and update computer systems. • After this course, students also will be able to use the Internet to update computer systems and complete other IT service-related tasks. They will be able to install, configure, or modify software and operating systems to ensure optimal system function. • Students will be able to perform computer backup procedures to protect information. They also will be able to recognize potential security threats and understand the procedures for maintaining security. • After this course students will be able to provide IT support and training for computers and networks. Fundamentals of Computer Systems Course Requirements For topics in this course, it is helpful for students to be familiar with the basics of using desktop or laptop computers as well as accessing Web sites over the Internet. If students are not familiar with these topics, it is recommended, though not required, that they familiarize themselves with the operating system and Web browser they will be using for this course. This includes turning on a computer and logging into an account, if necessary, exploring the different types of software available, navigating through some of the operating system menus to understand the available tools, and doing a basic search on the Internet.0.5
FUNDAMENTALS OF DIGITAL MEDIAElectiveThis course gives an overview of the different types of digital media and how they are used in the world today. Students examine the impact that digital media has on culture and lifestyle. The course reviews the basic concepts for creating effective digital media and introduces a number of different career paths that relate to digital media. Students will examine some tools used to create digital media and discuss best practices in the creating of digital media. This includes an overview of the process used to create new media pieces as well as the basics concepts of project management. In the course, students will examine the use of social media, digital media in advertising, digital media on the World Wide Web, digital media in business, gaming and simulations, e-commerce, and digital music and movies. Students will review ethics and laws that impact digital media use or creation. Objectives • Discuss different types of digital media. • Explain the value of using online video and audio for business. • Discuss careers in digital media. • Compare and contrast digital media and traditional forms of media. • Discuss living in a digital society and the changes resulting from it. • Discuss project management as a career. • Describe the evolution of social media. • Discuss ethics and social media. • Identify some challenges that the gaming industry will face in the future. • Compare the different types of computer languages. • Determine the role digital media plays in globalization. • Explain the limitations of doing business on the web. • Describe some different laws that relate to digital media. • Explain the cannons of journalism. • Describe some expected changes in social media and advertising. • Determine what type of schooling is necessary for their chosen career.0.5
FUNDAMENTALS OF PROGRAMMING AND SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENTComputer TechThis course will provide students with an understanding of basic software development concepts and practices, issues affecting the software industry, careers within the software industry, and the skills necessary to perform well in these occupations. Students will learn details about core concepts in programming using Java, including writing and debugging code, proper syntax, flow of control, order of operations, comparison operators, and program logic tools and models. They will learn the function of key program techniques including if statements, looping, and arrays. They will also learn about web development using HTML and drag-and-drop development of user interfaces in an Integrated Development environment. Students will also learn about the Software Development Life Cycle and the different variations used to create software. They will learn about different programming languages and paradigms. They will learn about the importance of usability and user-centered design processes. Students will also learn about careers in the software industry, the education and skills required to work in the industry, and related career resources. Finally, the capstone project will allow students to explore and state opinions on key issues and trends impacting the software industry, and to learn about the experience of working in the industry. Objectives • Understand the relationship between computer hardware and software. • Describe the purpose and high-level organization of the central processing unit. • Understand categories of software and be able to properly assign software products into the correct category. • Describe the key functions of systems software. • Describe the functionality of popular software applications (e.g., word processing, database management, spreadsheet development). • Understand the function and operation of compilers and interpreters. Fundamentals of Programming and Software Development Course Requirements For topics in this course, it is helpful for students to be familiar with the basics of using desktop and laptop computers as well as accessing websites over the Internet. If students are unfamiliar with these topics, it is recommended, though not required, that they familiarize themselves with creating and saving files in a text editing or word processing application and with using web browsers and conducting searches on the Internet.0.5
General History 900HistoryGeneral History 900 focuses on American life, with an emphasis on government and citizenship. Additionally, the course covers ancient civilizations, personal responsibility, and global geography, with special emphasis on the regions of the world. These areas of focus target four major content strands: History, Geography, Government and Citizenship, and Social Studies Skills. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to: understand the rise of early civilizations in Mesopotamia and Egypt understand the usages of various geographic tools, including different types of maps, charts, and graphs locate and describe different regions of the world, such as climactic regions and political regions understand how conflict between the American colonies and Great Britain led to American independence understand how annexation and acquisition of land led to the growth of the United States understand the social and cultural impact and contributions of immigrant groups and individuals on American society after 1880 understand the structure and functions of American government at the federal, state, and local levels understand the overall design, as well as specific features, of the U.S. Constitution understand the role of the citizen in American democracy understand their personal responsibilities to the world, to society, and to their own futures Additionally, students will gain practice in report-writing, covering topics like the breakup of the USSR, the growth of the United States, and elected leaders (senators and representatives).1
Health QuestElectiveHealth Quest is a health science elective course for upper elementary and junior high students. The curriculum introduces students to the concepts of what good health is, why good health is important, and what students should do in order to achieve good health. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to do the following: Demonstrate an awareness of health as it applies to their own bodies, minds, and emotions. Demonstrate an awareness of health as it applies to their living environments. Identify the components of a healthy lifestyle and set reasonable goals to achieve a lifestyle of wellness. Understand that incorporating sound health practices creates a lifestyle of moderation and wellness. Describe health as it applies to broader society, the world, and their own responsibility to stimulate good health around them.1
High School HealthElectiveHigh School Health is a health science elective course that introduces students to what good health is, why good health is important, and what students should do in order to achieve good health. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to do the following: Demonstrate an awareness of health as it applies to their own bodies, minds, and emotions. Demonstrate an awareness of health as it applies to their living environments. Identify the components of a healthy lifestyle and set reasonable goals to achieve a lifestyle of wellness. Understand that incorporating sound health practices creates a lifestyle of moderation and wellness. Understand the responsibility of properly caring for their bodies. Describe health as it applies to broader society, the world, and their own responsibility to stimulate good health around them.0.5
INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURE, FOOD, AND NATURAL RESOURCESElectiveThis semester-length high school elective introduces students to the basic scientific principles of Agriculture and Natural Resources. Students will be recognizing and researching plant systems, animal systems, government policy, “green” technologies, agribusiness principles, and sustainability systems. Objectives • Apply understanding of ecosystems and systems thinking to the management of natural resources to maximize the health and productivity of the environment, agriculture, and communities. • Analyze community practice or policy development related to sustainability in agriculture, food, and natural resources. • Communicate the impact of “green” and sustainability principles on agriculture, food, and natural resource systems. • Recognize the social, health, environmental, and economic costs and benefits of renewable energy production (e.g., solar, wind, and biofuels) in comparison to non-renewable energies (e.g., coal, oil, and natural gas). • Analyze energy usage, renewable energy options, and renewable materials options to promote sustainable practices across AFNR. • Use0.5
Introduction to Careers in Architecture and ConstructionElectiveThe goal of this course is to provide students with an overview of careers in Architecture and Construction in order to assist with informed career decisions. This dynamic, rapidly evolving career cluster is comprised of three pathways (fields): Design and Pre-Construction (Architecture and Engineering); Construction (Construction and Extraction); and Maintenance and Operations (Installation, Maintenance, and Repair). The Architecture and Construction career cluster is defined as careers in building, designing, managing, maintaining, and planning the built environment.

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Introduction to Careers in Arts, A/V Technology and CommunicationElectiveThis introductory course provides comprehensive information on five separate areas of arts and communications as potential educational and career pathways. Students who are interested in careers across a broad spectrum of professional positions, including fine artist, telecommunications administrator, magazine editor, broadcast journalist, or computer graphics artist, will gain useful perspective on industry terminology, technology, work environment, job outlook, and guiding principles.0.5
Introduction to Careers in Education and TrainingElectiveThe Introduction to Careers in Education and Training course will introduce students to the field of education and training, and the opportunities available for early‐childhood care, primary school, secondary school, higher education, vocational training, and adult and continuing education. The students will gain an understanding of the career options available in teaching, administrative work, and support services. They will also explore the education and background experience needed to succeed in these careers.

Students will learn about the evolution of the modern educational system in the United States, and the policies and laws that govern educational institutions. They will also discover the similarities and differences between the ethical and legal obligations of working with adults versus working with children.

Students will learn about the skills needed to be effective communicators. They will also learn how to differentiate between different types of learning theories, and they will explore how to implement current principles from educational psychology into the classroom.

Students will also learn how to create a safe and healthy learning environment. They will discover the federal laws and agencies that set health‐and‐safety standards, and they will learn how these regulations are enforced in the workplace. The objective of this course is to introduce the student to the field of education and training, and to explain the career opportunities that are available in this field.
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Introduction to Careers in FinanceElectiveThe Introduction to Careers in Finance course provides the fundamentals of the financial services industry in the United States and explores the jobs and career opportunities that the industry offers.

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Introduction to Careers in Government and Public AdministrationElectiveIntroduction to Careers in Government and Public Administration will provide students with an overview of American politics and public administration, including how political institutions and public management systems at the local, state, and federal levels exercise supervisory authority and maintain accountability.

Students will learn about the foundations of the U.S. government, the separation of powers, the federal civil service system, and the relationship between the government and state and local officials.

They will also learn about governmental powers of the states and of local governments, such as education, law enforcement, and transportation.

Students will learn about politics in the United States and the electoral process, political attitudes and opinions, and American political parties.

They will also learn about the structure of U.S. federal governmental institutions, the nature of bureaucracy, and the functions of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government.

Students will also learn about policy making in American government, including discussions of foreign and defense policies.

After completing this course, students will have a fundamental understanding of U.S. government and public administration. They will be able to explain the history and structure of the government, how the government functions and relates to state and local governments, and how the government creates and enforces public policies.
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INTRODUCTION TO CAREERS IN HEALTH SCIENCESElectiveThis course is an overview of health careers and overriding principles central to all health professions. Units include: • science and technology in human health • anatomy, physiology, and disease development • privacy, ethics, and safety in health care • communication and teamwork in the health care environment • health careers; creating a diverse workforce of lifelong learners The course provides a foundation for further study in the field of health science. When students complete the course, they will be able to discuss the potential career choices and have an understanding of basic concepts that apply to many different career choices. The student will: • • • • • • • • • • • • • evaluate the history of health care with respect to current developments compare and contrast methods of communication within the health care community examine the roles and responsibilities of individuals as members of a health care team compare career options in health care with respect to educational requirements and licensure examine issues relating to workforce diversity and access to health care distinguish between ethical and unethical practices in health care analyze potential and existing workplace hazards that can compromise health care worker safety, and the safety of patients and coworkers evaluate the impact of science and technology on health care understand how to organize and structure work individually and in teams for effective performance and attainment of goals understand how to interact with others in ways to demonstrate respect for individual and cultural differences and for the attitudes and feelings of others understand the role of antibodies in the body's response to infection examine role of the skin in providing nonspecific defenses against infection analyze the organization of the body and functions and interactions of organ systems0.5
Introduction to Careers in ManufacturingElectiveThe Introduction to Careers in Manufacturing course provides the fundamentals of manufacturing in the United States and explores the jobs and career opportunities that manufacturing offers.0.5
Introduction to Careers in MarketingElectivehe Introduction to Marketing course will provide students with an overview of marketing, which is an essential element for any company that produces products that are bought and used by individuals. Students will learn about what marketing is and how the process of marketing works, the role of market research and how companies incorporate ethics into their marketing strategies.

They will also learn about the importance of strategic planning for marketers, the five step marketing strategic process, and strategies for growth.

Students will learn about the environment in which marketers operate. This includes the microenvironment, which refers to entities and influences close to the company or marketer, and the macroenvironment, which refers to influences that impact all of society, such as culture, social trends, and technology.

They will also learn about the Four P’s of the marketing mix: product, price, promotion, and place. Students will evaluate the importance of each of these four elements and learn specifically about how technology has changed the approach to the marketing mix. They will also learn about international markets and how to approach marketing at a global level.

After completing this course, students will have a fundamental understanding of the principles of marketing. They will be able to explain the marketing process, marketing strategic planning, the marketing environment, and the trends, opportunities, and challenges in the marketing world today.
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Introduction to Careers in Transportation, Distribution, and LogisticsElectiveTransportation and Distribution Logistics is a course intended to introduce students to the complicated world of commercial transportation. This area of commerce is becoming increasingly complex and sophisticated, with work and career openings available at all levels of education. Most people, however, see only fragments of the big picture.

Transportation is among the most crucial and defining elements of modern commerce. The ability to move people and goods from place to place requires vast investments of technology, and of manpower. Without that investment almost all aspects of modern life would grind to a halt.
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INTRODUCTION TO CONSUMER SERVICESElectiveIn this introductory Consumer Services course, students analyze various career paths in terms of employment opportunities. We will discuss educational requirements, including applicable hard and soft skills, certifications, and licensures for different pathways. Developing research, analytical, and presentations skills will be key components. This course is designed as an overview to prepare students for a consumer services-related career and to introduce them to specialty areas. Emphasis is placed on the human services aspect (vs. corporate concerns) of consumer services. Social issues and advocacy, as well as ethics and legalities, are a recurring theme. Students will gain knowledge of current issues affecting various consumer services professions, and the impact of local, state, national and global issues on consumer services. Objectives • Analyze careers in the in the consumer services industry in terms of employment opportunities, salary levels, education requirements, necessary skills, certification requirements, entrepreneurial opportunities, and employment outlook. • Understand the importance of exhibiting ethical behavior and encourage co-workers to comply with ethical and legal responsibilities in the work place. • Identify common safety concerns in an organization and describe ways to promote safety in the workplace. • Demonstrate active listening techniques to interpret information and ensure the clarity of the information. • Understand the role and importance of consumer advocacy groups at national, state, and local levels. • Define the roles of credit counselors and risk management specialists. • Describe and evaluate design careers, writing careers, and related communications-based careers in translation and interpretation. • Define the role of writers and editors in consumer services. • Demonstrate an ability to articulate clearly the organization’s policies, rules, and procedures. • Describe the role of a public relations director and evaluate public relations careers within consumer services. • Evaluate sales and related marketing careers in consumer services. Students should be computer literate at an intermediate level and have Internet access. Students should have basic research skills, as well as the ability to conduct online searches and access recommended websites. Basic math skills at the Algebra I level (arithmetic, ratios, graphing) are required. Access to and intermediate-level proficiency with word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software is highly encouraged for use in producing projects.0.5
INTRODUCTION TO HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM SYSTEMSElectiveTravel and tourism is now the largest industry in the world: In the United States alone, over 7.5 million people work in this industry, and in 2010, 60 million international visitors came to the United States, spending $134 billion. All of the sectors of the travel and tourism industry work together to serve this growing market of visitors, who have a significant impact on the U.S. economy. This course establishes a foundation for the concept of tourism, travel, and hospitality as a system. Students will learn about the various segments of the travel and tourism industry and how they are interrelated and integral to international and domestic travel and tourism. This discussion will include travel agencies, tour companies, the airlines and other transportation sectors, lodging facilities, cruise lines, and marketing companies. In this course, students will learn to: • Explain why travel and tourism is important to our economy. • Identify the six major sectors of the travel and tourism industry. • Understand how geographic principles relate to traveler decisions. • Understand the different types of airline flights and aircraft, the car-rental industry, and the rail-travel industry. • Classify the different types and brands of lodging. • Describe the types of service offered in the food-services industry. • Describe the different kinds of cruise lines, ships, and popular cruise destinations. • Understand the basic types of marketing. • Understand the basic types of marketing and what marketing organizations do. • Explain how the Internet and social media have changed the tourism industry This course requires that the student: • • • have access to the Internet to view various travel-related Web sites and conduct research. should have access to Microsoft® PowerPoint® or a similar program. be able to contact various tourism companies for projects.0.5
INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENTElectiveThis course focuses on human growth and development over the lifespan, as well as careers that help people deal with various physical, intellectual, and socioemotional issues, such as physicians, nurses, nutritionists, substance abuse counselors, clergy, teachers, career counselors, psychologists, and psychiatrists. This course is important because it gives the student a background in human growth and development from before birth, through childhood, into adulthood, and through death and grief. It gives the student perspective and highlights where people in the caring professions are most needed. Students who take this course will come away with a broad understanding of all the careers that help people from birth to death. They will understand how people in the helping professions interact with each other and how continued growth in this sector can give them flexibility, good pay, and high job satisfaction. Objectives • Compare and contrast careers that provide care and counseling for people throughout the life span. • Evaluate the importance of a stable, loving family structure on socioemotional development. • Assess the importance of proper prenatal care on the developing fetus. • Examine the roles and responsibilities of parents, teachers, and health care professionals in generating positive outcomes regarding children. • Understand the different developmental tasks humans have during each stage of life and that we never stop learning and growing. • Examine their personal interests and inabilities in relation to choosing an appropriate career. • Summarize the value of education in achieving their life goals. Students will have to conduct research into areas such as obedience versus conformity; single-sex versus same-sex schools; the perspectives of the psychologists Erik Erikson, Jean Piaget, Sigmund Freud, Lev Vygotsky, and Lawrence Kohlberg; and career assessments. Some of the tasks in the chapter projects ask for answers that can be found in the lessons themselves, while others require research using the Internet. Students should have access to a computer with Internet and a good working knowledge of how to find information on the web. While sample URLs are usually presented as a starting point, the student should have a basic knowledge of using search engines to find specific information.0.5
INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN SERVICESElectiveThis course introduces high school students to the possibilities for careers in the human services professions. Through anecdotes, lessons, and a variety of assignments and projects, students will learn about the broad variety of jobs available in the human services. These begin with entry-level positions, such as associate social workers, that require only a two-year Associate of Arts degree. At the apex of the profession, being a psychiatrist brings the most prestige and the biggest salary, but only after many years of school and training. Students will learn exactly what the human services are and the ethics and philosophies of the helping professions. The history of the profession will be covered, as well as the impact of the cultural, social, and economic environment on individual people, especially those who are in need of social services assistance. By the conclusion of this course, students will have a firm introductory understanding of the social services professions. Employment at all levels of social work and related jobs is projected to grow rapidly over the next decade. Students will have a better idea of whether this is a career course they would like to explore further. Objectives • to provide students with information about the history and development of the human services field • to offer insight into the practical as well as theoretical functions of the human services profession in society • to offer students opportunities to identify and strengthen problem-solving abilities • to develop or increase interpersonal communications skills, which are critical in human services or helping professions • to help develop students’ self-awareness while they explore whether the field of human services is a viable career path that fits with their values and personal characteristics As an introduction to the human services professions, this course requires no specific academic prerequisites. Any student willing to do the assigned work will be able to complete this course successfully. The only real requirements are a desire to help others and a curiosity about human services as a possible career choice.0.5
INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION TECHNOLOGYComputer TechIn this course, we introduce students to the knowledge base and technical skills that will help them to successfully compete for jobs within the Information Technology Career Cluster. Lessons are structured so that students learn and then demonstrate not only critical assessment and analytic skills, but also interpersonal skills that are valued so highly among IT employers. We explore a range of career tracks that include network engineers, application/programming developers, and systems analysts. These career paths are described in depth, discussing typical job responsibilities, educational and licensure requirements, working conditions, and job outlooks. Our lessons help students place the evolution of technology and job opportunities in context so that they will understand their important role in furthering its development. We believe that the most successful IT professionals combine technical know-how with leadership ability. To this end, students learn that their acquired expertise comes with the responsibility to represent themselves and the companies they work for within the highest legal and ethical standards. Objectives • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Identify the basic components and structure of a computer system and its use within a networking/communications environment. Design and implement a basic network while being introduced to multiple types of network systems. Apply both ethical and industry standard security policies to networks. Discuss the history and development and use of the Internet in business and society. Explain the development of human-centered technology interaction. Apply mobile computing technology capabilities to learning and business. Identify the variety of operating systems found on desktops, laptops, and mobile devices. Understand mobile application architecture, deployment, and marketing. Determine best practice application skills for the variety of information technology systems available to implement. Plan, develop, and implement an information system. Maximize use of the Internet within the home and business. Identify the structure of wireless communication networks and the mechanisms behind its functionality. Identify and develop protocols for use of the Internet within business. Identify and develop information system libraries and repositories of information. Develop an understanding of the logic behind object-oriented programming. Identify the multiple programming languages for use in mobile/Internet application development. Plan, develop, and implement a mobile/Internet application.0.5
INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SUPPORT AND SERVICESComputer TechThis course focuses on real-world application including common industry best practices and specific vendors that offer tools for technicians, project managers, and IT leadership. Emphasis should be made that the purpose of the IT department of an enterprise is to support the overall mission of the company, and it is not simply a standalone component of the company’s infrastructure. Students will continue to apply their knowledge of hardware and software components associated with IT systems while exploring a variety of careers related to IT support and services. Students will analyze technical support needs to perform customer service, perform configuration management activities, and evaluate application software packages and emerging software. Students will demonstrate and apply knowledge of IT analysis and design by initiating a system project and evaluating applications within the IT system. Information Technology is a dynamic discipline that is continuously evolving. You will also find these objectives at the beginning of each lesson under “Lesson Expectations.” Objectives • • • • Explore systems design and implementation. Investigate the implementation and maintenance of IT infrastructure. Review the basics of management collaboration and reporting. Discuss education and careers in IT and how to pursue such a career.0.5
INTRODUCTION TO NETWORK SYSTEMSElectiveHow can we automate the transfer of information from one computer to another? To answer that question, this course introduces students to the fundamental technology and concepts that make networking systems possible. The question itself is a very practical one and the concepts taught are more concerned with practices and processes rather than theoretical generalities. The most important concept introduced is that of the OSI reference model and its bottom four layers, which are most directly concerned with networking instead of computing. Each networking layer is explored in a three-lesson chapter. By the end of the course, every student should be comfortable reading a sentence that says something like, “X is a protocol working at the third layer.” The course also explores a good deal of technology, specifically the software and hardware supporting LANs, WANs, and Wi-Fi networks. Particularly important are the protocols in the TCP/IP stack that are used to communicate across a network, but the students are also introduced to the hardware, including hubs, switches, bridges, routers, and transmission media. The student is expected to learn that a network is not some mysterious idea out there in cyberspace. It is a mechanism that is fully dependent on its parts working properly. Once the students understand the fundamentals of the layers and network hardware, they can be introduced to questions of security, network management, and network operating systems. In particular, they should understand the role of the server. They have already encountered many examples of client-server relationships, and the material later in the course should introduce them to the many roles that a server can play as a part of a network. Objectives • State the purpose of a computer network, and explain the role of network hardware in achieving that purpose; • List at least four protocols from the TCP/IP stack and explain how each contributes to data transmission; • Explain the technical differences between a LAN and a WAN; • Explain the importance of technical standards in networks; • List all seven layers of the OSI reference model and explain what each of the bottom four layers contributes to a network; • Compare and contrast the Windows Server and Linux operating systems. Students who are unfamiliar with computers and/or the Internet are likely to be at a disadvantage in this course. There are, however, no theoretical concepts required or expected for students entering the course. 0.5
INTRODUCTION TO STEMElectiveThis semester-length high school elective introduces students to the four areas of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics through an interdisciplinary approach that will increase awareness, build knowledge, develop problem solving skills, and potentially awaken an interest in pursuing a career in STEM. Students will be introduced to the history, fundamental principles, applications, processes, and concepts of STEM. Students will explore some of the great discoveries and innovations in STEM and review and analyze some of the world’s problems that still exist today. Students are introduced to several computer applications used to analyze and present technical or scientific information. They will also gain a higher understanding of the uses for images and measurement in everyday life. Finally, students will be challenged to use a selection of problem- solving strategies to solve a wide variety of unique problems representative of the kinds of strategies frequently used in these disciplines. Throughout the course, students will have the opportunity to gain a better awareness of their specific strengths through practical applications and awareness of the various careers in STEM. Objectives • Understand the STEM field along with the concepts, theories, practical applications, and STEM careers. • Compare and contrast the different fields in STEM education, and examine the impact STEM education has on the world by reviewing some of the great STEM innovations and inventions. • Describe the roles, duties, educational requirements, salaries, and outlook for different STEM careers. • Formulate solutions to various world problems by conducting scientific experiments, collecting and analyzing the results of various experiments, and applying technology. For topics in this lesson, students should have a basic knowledge of the STEM field: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics, and its importance in the world. They should also understand that people in the STEM field are dedicated to resolving and improving societal, economic, and environmental problems.0.5
Law Enforcement Field ServicesElectiveThe Introduction to Law Enforcement Services course will introduce students to the field of law enforcement and the local, county, state and federal laws that law enforcement personnel are sworn to uphold. The student will also gain an understanding of the career options available in this field and the skills, education and background experience needed to succeed in these careers.

Students will learn about the evolution of the role of law enforcement in the United States and the interplay between individual freedoms and the government’s need to protect the country. They will also learn about key changes affecting law enforcement following the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, including the creation of new laws, the restructuring of many departments within the federal government and the creation of the Department of Homeland Security.

Students will learn about the interaction between local, county, state and federal law enforcement agencies. The lessons will emphasize the importance of interagency communication and information sharing. Students will learn about the technological advances and new federal programs that aid cooperation between agencies.

Students will also learn about the types of crime that are commonly committed, and the procedures, evidence collection techniques and technological advances that law enforcement personnel use to investigate them. Students will learn how the development of computers and the Internet has changed the way many crimes are committed. They will also learn how investigators address the resulting increased globalization of criminal activity.
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LAW, PUBLIC SAFETY, CORRECTIONS, AND SECURITY INTRODUCTION TO LAW, PUBLIC SAFETY, CORRECTIONS, AND SECURITYElectiveLaw enforcement, public safety, corrections and safety professionals work daily to keep our cities and communities safe. There are few careers paths in the United States that can be as rewarding, challenging and important as a career in legal, public safety, corrections or security fields. The sacrifices and challenges faced by these selfless individuals is virtually unparalleled by any other profession outside of the armed forces. Whether it be keeping innocent people from harm, bringing justice to victims, fighting fires, saving people from danger or ensuring evil-doers are locked away. These career fields offer great opportunities to those who choose to work in them. Life in the twenty-first century would not be possible without police officers, paramedics, firefighters, attorneys, corrections officers or security guards. In this course, you learned about the many careers that exist within the fields of law, law enforcement, public safety, corrections, and security. Besides learning about the training and educational requirements for these careers, you learned about the history of these fields and how they developed to their current state. You also learned how these careers are affected by and affect local, state and federal laws. Finally, you learned about the relationships between professionals in these fields and how collaborations between professionals in these careers help to create a safer, more stable society. Objectives • Analyze and interpret the differences between the public sector criminal justice system and private security. • Understand the duties of the various career paths in the legal, public safety, corrections and private security fields. • Recognize and be able to apply the different laws and regulations affecting the legal, public safety, corrections and private security fields. • Develop the requisite interpersonal, conflict resolution and communication skills and critical thinking skills that are required to have successful careers in an ever-changing economic, technological, political, and social environment. • Understand regulations and policies relating to human resource management, technologies, and sustainability to maintain safe and productive work environments. • Demonstrate an understanding of legal, public safety, corrections and security practices. • Apply analytical methods to understand the process of gathering and utilizing intelligence in crime prevention and providing security services. • Understand the evolution of public safety in the United States. • Recognize the different regulations and requirements required to obtain employment in the legal, public safety, corrections and private security fields. For this course, students should know that: • there are many available careers in the law enforcement, public safety, corrections and security fields; • these careers have diverse career paths that combine educational and physical requirements with high standards for training; and • these careers are directly impacted by local, state and federal laws. Students should have: • the ability to access the Internet; and • the ability to work in group settings.0.5
LEGAL SERVICESElectiveThe Legal Services course will provide students with an overview of the system of laws in the United States and the practice areas and career options in the field. Students will learn about how the legal system operates to control how society punishes those who commit crimes and settles disputes, as well as how criminal and civil cases reach court and are resolved. They will learn about the courtroom and the basics of a typical court case. Students will learn about constitutional rights and legal safeguards, as well as how technology has changed the practice of law. They will also learn about legal education and careers in law for attorneys and non-attorneys with an interest in the field. Objectives • Understand the basics of the U.S. legal system. • Explain the significant historical events that impacted the formation of the current legal system. • Understand how the rule of law influences the modern world. • Distinguish between the various types of written laws and select the most appropriate for a given situation or application. • Understand the Bill of Rights and analyze the impact of Supreme Court decisions regarding those important rights. • Identify the roles of court personnel. • Evaluate a controversy or dispute to determine what legal recourse is available to the aggrieved parties; as well as be able to analyze and determine the appropriate use of various types of evidence. • Summarize the steps to admission to law school and be familiar with court requirements for the Juris Doctor program. • Understand the role of the paralegal and be able to evaluate various career options in the legal workforce. Legal Services Course Requirements For topics in this course it is helpful for students to be familiar with the basics of U.S. history and the organization of the U.S. government. If students are not familiar with these topics, it is recommended, though not required that they familiarize themselves with the structure of the government in the United States. This includes reading the U.S. Constitution, reviewing the roles of the three branches of the federal government, as well as reviewing the structure of various state governments0.5
LODGING OPERATIONS MANAGEMENTElectiveThis course introduces students to hotel management. Students taking this course briefly review the history of the lodging industry, and place contemporary hotels in a larger context of the hospitality industry. They then study hotels from several different angles: vision and mission, organizational structures, and the structure and functions of different divisions within the hotel. The course emphasizes the rooms divisions, and addresses how it relates to food and beverage, sales and marketing, hospitality, and security divisions. In the process, students get a chance to research and/or observe a number of hotels and hotel divisions in action. As a result, this course is valuable to students planning a career in hotel management, especially those interested in front office operations. It is also useful to any student interested in the hospitality industry or business in general. In this course, students will learn to: • use written communication skills in creating, expressing and interpreting information and ideas including technical terminology and information • solve problems using critical thinking skills • classify hotels in terms of their levels of service, and ownership and affiliation • describe how hotels are organized and explain how functional areas within hotels are classified • summarize front office operations during the four stages of the guest cycle • discuss the sales dimension of the reservations process • identify the tools managers use to track and control reservations • list the seven steps of the registration process • discuss creative registration options • identify typical service requests that guests make at the front desk • describe the process of creating and maintaining front office accounts • understand the importance of check-out procedures to ensure guest satisfaction and verify settlement of account • discuss the importance of housekeeping standards to assure guest satisfaction • summarize the steps in the front office audit process • explain the concept of revenue management • discuss how managers can maximize revenue by using forecast information in capacity management, discount allocation, and duration control • explain important issues in developing and managing a security program • research the major duties and qualifications for managerial positions common to front of the house and back of the house operations There are no formal prerequisites for the course. However, the course assumes students will have regular and reliable access to the Internet, that they are comfortable reading and writing, and that they are willing and able to engage in Internet-based research.0.5
MARKETING AND SALES FOR TOURISM AND HOSPITALITYElectiveThis course is designed as an introduction to the study of tourism and hospitality marketing and sales. Students will be introduced to marketing theory and application of the basic principles of marketing as applied in hospitality and tourism. The relationship between marketing and other functions such as advertising, sales techniques, and public relations in order to maximize profits in a hospitality organization is addressed. Students will have an opportunity to explore this multi-faceted world, identifying multiple career paths and opportunities. Course objectives: • • • • Explain the impact of technology on tourism and hospitality marketing and sales. Develop a plan for a career in tourism and hospitality marketing and sales. Create a marketing plan for a local business in the community Improve written, verbal, and presentation skills.0.5
MEDIA STUDIESElectiveThis semester-long course is part of a worldwide educational movement called media literacy. The goal of the media literacy movement is to educate people about how the media impacts both individuals and society as a whole. Students will examine media such as magazines, the Internet, video games, and movies. They'll learn the kinds of strategies that advertisers use to persuade people to buy products. They'll also explore how news broadcasters choose which stories to air. Lessons and projects encourage students to examine ways in which media helps shape our culture and the ways in which our culture shapes the media. While many media literacy courses focus upon learning how to make media, this one will focus exclusively on analyzing the media. Throughout the course, students are asked to answer questions or to reflect on what they've read in their notes. The notes are not graded. Rather, they are a way for students to extend their thinking about the lesson content. Students may keep handwritten or typed notes.0.5
Money Matters AElectiveIn this course students will explore global economics, and the impact of the free enterprise system on business and consumers. Students will learn about their financial options and goal-setting based on existing and projected economic indicators. Investments, income taxes, asset planning will also be investigated, as will risk management, and retirement and estate planning.0.5
Money Matters BElectiveIn this course students will explore global economics, and the impact of the free enterprise system on business and consumers. Students will learn about their financial options and goal-setting based on existing and projected economic indicators. Investments, income taxes, asset planning will also be investigated, as will risk management, and retirement and estate planning.0.5
Music AppreciationFine ArtsThe goal of this semester-long course is to provide instruction in basic musical elements, trace the development and growth of classical music, and give students a strong foundation for a greater appreciation of music. Students will examine music in the world around them and discover how they experience music. They'll be introduced to the basic elements and sounds of music and instruments. Students will learn the names and backgrounds of several famous musical composers. Students will also learn how and where classical music began, how it developed over the centuries, and the ways in which music and culture affect each other. Lastly, students will examine the ways modern music has been influenced by classical music. This course also provides students with lessons in engaged listening. These special lessons allow students to listen and respond to music. A template for how to listen and respond is provided. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to do the following: Describe effective techniques to listen and respond to music. Identify and name common instruments by sight or sound. Identify and define musical terms such as beat, meter, notes, and tempo. Compare and contrast music from the Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque periods. List ways in which the societies of the Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque periods affected their music. Compare and contrast music from the Classical and Romantic periods. List ways in which the societies of the Classical and Romantic periods affected their music. Analyze the effects of classical and popular music on the music of the 20th century.0.5
Music TheoryFine ArtsMusic Theory is a semester-length fine arts elective for high school students. The course requires no prior instrumental, vocal, or music theory study. Using the piano keyboard as a visual basis for comprehension, the course materials explore the nature of music, integrating these concepts: rhythm and meter written music notation the structure of various scale types interval qualities melody and harmony the building of chords transposition Throughout the series of assignments, ear training exercises are interspersed with the bones of composition technique, building in students the ability not only to hear and appreciate music, but step-by-step, to create it in written form as well. This highly interactive course culminates in the students producing original compositions, which while based on standard notation, demonstrate facets of personal expression. As the students’ ability to perform increases in the future, they will better understand music and therefore better demonstrate its intrinsic communication of emotion and ideas.0.5
National Security CareersElectiveThis course discusses careers in national security. It provides you with the history, background, and recent advances in this field. Millions of people work in national security positions, from military enlisted personnel, writers, politicians, photographers, and law enforcement personnel to agents, investigators, scientists, and administrative personnel. Just about any career you can imagine is available in national security.0.5
NATURAL RESOURCES SYSTEMSElectivePeople depend on natural resources. Regions, cultures, nations, and societies are shaped by how people use land, water, plants, and wildlife. The large and small ecosystems that make up the environment are complex. Each component of our ecosystem depends on another. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an overview of the planet’s natural resource systems. Students will explore and develop a basic understanding of how the systems relate to one another other. Students will consider the role people play in managing, using, protecting, and conserving natural resources. In addition, the course will provide information about many different careers that are available to students who are interested in natural resources and natural resource management. Objectives • Recognize the complex and multidisciplinary interrelationships of the natural resource system, including the relationship between humans and the environment. • Summarize the challenges and issues facing our natural resource system. • Construct ideas for addressing challenges and issues related to natural resource management and identify the different career paths related to natural resource management. • Analyze and interpret basic environmental policy and discuss the role of government involvement in natural resources. • Identify environmental stewardship practices and strategies for sustainable natural resource management. • Develop the communication and critical thinking skills required for addressing complex environmental problems that have multiple perspectives and multiple vested interests. Students should be familiar with general concepts about the environment. Students wishing to gain additional insight into many of the issues and challenges facing wildlife managers before beginning this course may benefit from reviewing the information provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture at http://usda.gov/wps/portal/usda/usdahome?navid=CONSERVATION.0.5
NETWORK SYSTEM DESIGNElectiveThe Network System Design course will provide students with an understanding of computer networks and how they operate, as well as a basic understanding of how to manage and maintain computer networks. These skills will provide students with the ability to design, configure, and troubleshoot networks of all sizes. Students will learn the basics of network design, including how to identify network requirements and determine the proper network architecture. They will be instructed on the requirements of network models, as well as be introduced to local area networks. Students will also learn about Internet Protocol and the basics of routing data on a network. Students will be introduced to wide area networks and network security issues. In addition, students will learn about network management, including monitoring and troubleshooting. Last, students will learn about network operating systems and their role in connecting computers and facilitating communications. Objectives • Understand computer networks and their functions, as well as know how to analyze business and technical goals of a network to effectively meet customer needs. • Identify requirements to successfully support network users, applications, and devices. They will also understand network architecture and topology, protocols, and services of local and wide area networks. • Identify principles and operation of equipment like wire and circuits, as well as of standards such as open system interconnection, TCP/IP, and high-speed networking. • Demonstrate knowledge of security requirements and data protection on a network, as well as the role of security tools such as routers, firewalls, and virtual private networks. • Understand network operating systems and be able to support computer networks. For topics in this course, it is helpful for students to be familiar with the basics of computer hardware (desktop and laptop), as well as desktop operating systems. If students are not familiar with these topics, it is recommended, though not required, that they be introduced to computer hardware and desktop or workstation operating systems before starting this course. That includes examining hardware devices such as motherboards, hard drives, and processing chips and exploring the features and functions of a workstation operating system.0.5
NEW APPLICATIONS: WEB DEVELOPMENT IN THE 21ST CENTURYComputer TechNew Applications introduces students to the rapidly evolving world of apps, or applications. The introduction of the Apple II in 1977 followed by the IBM PC and scores of compatible computers just four years later created strong consumer demand for software programs, as these applications were referred to at the time. Capable of formatting spreadsheets, composing and proofing hundreds of lines of text, or supporting classroom instruction, computer programs were initially sold by specialty stores, college bookstores, or through the mail. The explosive growth of the Internet that followed at the beginning of the twenty-first century with the introduction of high-speed networking, the dynamic World Wide Web, and most recently the development of affordable smartphones and web tablets have all contributed to global, cultural, and societal change. This course begins with a historical tour of the Internet and World Wide Web as well as the programs and applications that made it possible for computer users on every continent to begin to explore and better understand their world. Then, through a step-by-step introduction to WordPress, students gain the tools and insight necessary to create their own web pages and discover their online voice. In addition to learning how to use WordPress and other applications that promote students' presence on the World Wide Web, this course discusses how the web has become the foremost channel for the distribution of applications that increase the functionality of the web and support a global hub of social networking and communication. Students are introduced to the evolution of networking and data-transfer capabilities beginning with early HTTP protocols continuing through to the recent introduction of smartphones capable of connecting to sites on the World Wide Web without having to rely on a browser for navigation. The course concludes with a survey of the continuing explosion of new apps, or applications, designed to operate on one or more of the proprietary mobile devices (smartphones, tablets, and netbooks). Students are given an opportunity to track fundamental changes in this growing industry as development has moved from the original model of a single experienced programmer developing a single app for distribution at little or no cost to a model in which retailers, non- profit organizations, government agencies, and Fortune 500 companies contract with mid-sized marketing and communications firms to develop sophisticated apps designed to raise global market and public awareness of institutions and issues. Additionally, students have an opportunity to understand that career opportunities in app development have evolved from programming and coding to now include marketing, public relations, creative arts, project and product management and sales, with a growing number of careers in the industry requiring little if any actual programming experience. New Applications is a survey course that travels from the first software programs developed to facilitate communication on the Internet to the new generation of mobile and native apps that access the Internet without a reliance on a web browser. New Applications is also a practical course in how to develop a presence on the World Wide Web using WordPress and other available web-application tools. The goal of the course is to provide the learner insight into the rapidly evolving universe of programming and application development so that he or she can make informed career decisions in an industry that is changing as quickly as it is growing. Objectives • Describe major advances in network and communications technology beginning with the early Internet and continuing through the introduction of web-enabled smartphones and other devices. • Create a web presence using simple applications. • Evaluate and select from a variety of web development tools and apps those most appropriate for their interests and needs. • Design a current generation app for use on a smartphone or tablet. • Evaluate the education and training qualities and experiences essential to secure a position with growth potential in the app industry This is an introductory course in the history and development of new applications for use on web-enabled devices including personal computers, tablets, smartphones, and ultrabooks. While there are no specific prerequisites for this course, students should have a basic understanding of the Internet, the World Wide Web, browsers, file formats, hardware, and software applications. Students who have working knowledge of IP addressing, programming, the differences among local, wide-area, and cloud-computing networks as well as the current state of mobile devices will be well prepared to complete this course.0.5
NURSING: UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES AND UNLIMITED POTENTIALElectiveEach year the Gallup Poll conducts a survey of the American public to determine the ten most respected professions in the country. Since 2001, registered nurses have topped that list. More registered nurses (2.7 million in 2010) work in healthcare than any other professional position; at the same time, a national shortage of qualified nurses exists and is projected to become significantly worse by 2020. As new nursing positions become available and a significant number of registered and licensed practical nurses approach retirement age, there are opportunities for recent graduates of accredited nursing programs throughout the country. However, in an era of new medical technology and increased specialization in patient care, healthcare administrators are becoming more discerning; offers of employment are extended to recent graduates of accredited baccalaureate nursing programs in far greater numbers than those offered to licensed practical nurses or registered nurses who successfully completed a hospital-based diploma program as well as those with an associate degree in nursing from a community college or professional school. This course provides students opportunities to compare and contrast the various academic and clinical training pathways to an entry-level position in nursing and to explore the growing number of opportunities for professional advancement given the proper preparation and experience. In June 2012, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the majority of provisions in the Affordable Care Act, which will extend health insurance benefits to an additional thirty-two million residents of this country and represents the most significant changes in healthcare since the introduction of Medicare and Medicaid. Nurses will continue to play a pivotal role in the care and treatment of these patients as well as have opportunities to make significant contributions to a new definition of healthcare. Partially in response to these rapid changes in healthcare, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the National Academies' Institute of Medicine conducted a thorough study of the current state of nursing as well as the profession's role in the future. This study, The Future of Nursing, has grown into a national initiative to redefine nursing education and scope of practice. In this course, students will have several opportunities to learn about the expanding scope of professional practice for registered nurses and better understand the important changes proposed in the education and ongoing professional development of nurses. A project at the end of this course will assist students in focusing their ambition and commitment to nursing service by better defining their available educational and clinical training opportunities. Objectives • Compare and contrast a variety of careers in nursing on the basis of academic preparation, scope of practice, training, licensure, patient contact, management/administrative responsibilities, and lifestyle. • Examine nursing skills common to all nursing professions and explore skill sets that are specific to a nursing specialty or discipline. • Calculate dosage given age, gender, anthropometric data and specific medication. • Examine the history of the nursing profession and its contributions to health care through time. • Evaluate case studies for scientific content and issues of ethics, privacy, and legal limitations to practice.0.5
OFFICE APPLICATIONS IElectiveOffice Applications I is a semester-length, high school elective that explores the use of application skills in Microsoft® Word®, Publisher®, and PowerPoint® 2010. Students will use these applications to design, develop, create, edit, and share business documents, publications, and presentations. This course provides key knowledge and skills in the following Microsoft Office® applications: 1. Microsoft Word: Students are provided with an introduction to advanced skills in Microsoft Word that range from simply developing an understanding of the various uses of Word to more complex explorations of mail merge, tab stops, reference resources, and additional features available in backstage view. 2. Microsoft Publisher: Students learn to create publications, insert and edit publication items, and view, review, and share those publications. 3. Microsoft PowerPoint: Students will learn how to create presentations, enter and modify content, modify and deliver presentations, and collaborate and share PowerPoint presentations. Objectives • Create, modify, save, and format styles, text, font, pages, and folders in Microsoft Word. • Demonstrate use of the Cut, Copy, and Paste commands and the Show/Hide button while editing documents. • Show how to use Spell Check, Find and Replace, and AutoCorrect in the Word application. • Know how to track changes and add comments in a document. • Demonstrate how to insert, format, modify, and edit elements of a Word document. • Demonstrate knowledge of Microsoft Word advanced skills. • Understand the basics of references in Word. • Modify document properties including templates. • Recognize how to navigate, modify, edit, and review elements of the Microsoft Publisher application. • Recall how to print and share a publication electronically. • Demonstrate knowledge of how to open, modify, insert, create, present, and save elements of a PowerPoint presentation. Students must be computer literate and have Internet access. Students should have basic research skills, as well as the ability to conduct online searches and access recommended websites. Word processing and presentation software is required to produce projects.0.5
OFFICE APPLICATIONS IIElectiveOffice Applications II is a semester-length, high school elective course that explores the use of application skills in Microsoft® Excel® and Microsoft® Access®. Students will use these applications to design, develop, create, edit, and share business spreadsheet and database documents. This course provides key knowledge and skills in the following areas: 1. Introduction to advanced skills in Microsoft® Excel® ranging from basic spreadsheet terminology to exploring data entry, formatting, formulas, functions, charts, graphics, and additional features available in backstage view 2. Skills in Microsoft® Access®, ranging from basic relational database terminology to creating and modifying tables, forms, queries, and reports Objectives • Recognize the elements of an Excel spreadsheet. • Demonstrate use of Excel navigation and protection tools. • Know how to modify, edit, save, create, and format Excel spreadsheets. • Use tools to manage Excel worksheets. • Define the rules for creating formulas and functions in Excel worksheets. • Demonstrate how to create, modify, and edit charts and shapes in Microsoft Excel. • Demonstrate knowledge of database design. • Manage the Access Environment. • Create an Access database. • Create, modify, and edit Access forms, queries, and reports. Office Applications 2 Course Requirements Students must be computer literate and have Internet access. Students should have basic research skills, as well as the ability to conduct online searches and access recommended websites. Word processing and presentation software might be required to produce projects.0.5
PERSONAL AND FAMILY LIVINGElectiveThis semester-long high school elective takes students on an interactive exploration of the challenges they may face as they transition into adulthood, including constructive conflict resolution, nutrition and health, building healthy families, financial responsibility, and long-term employment. Through this course, students will: Examine specific principles that will help develop their personal lives. Learn about proper nutrition, and demonstrate skill in preparing various food items. Prepare weekly and monthly budgets. Develop strategies for an employment search. Explore work and careers and how different interests, abilities and personalities influence employment decisions. Develop an understanding of relational dynamics with family members, friends, classmates, co-workers, and those encountered in the marketplace.0.5
PERSONAL CARE SERVICESElectiveThis course in Personal Care Services introduces students to a variety of careers in the following areas: cosmetology (including hairstyling and haircutting, esthetics, manicuring, makeup, and teaching) and barbering (including cutting and styling of hair and facial hair and manicuring for men); massage therapy, teaching body-mind disciplines (yoga, Pilates, and the martial arts), and fitness (general exercise classes and acting as a personal trainer); and mortuary science (embalming and funeral directing). The course teaches students about what each career entails and the education and training they will need to become credentialed in various career specialties. In addition, about half of the course is devoted to teaching knowledge associated with the various professions, so that students can get a feel for what they will have to learn and whether they would like to learn it. Five of 30 lessons are devoted to anatomy, which will be a subject covered in some fashion in most educational programs that students undertake to become personal care professionals. The first anatomy lesson in Unit One covers the major organ systems. Additional anatomy lessons are on the integumentary system (Unit Two), the musculoskeletal system (Unit Three), the respiratory and cardiovascular systems (Unit Four), and the blood and lymph systems (Unit Five). Moreover, technical information that would be learned in the study of each profession is systematically covered as the course progresses through career tracks and particular job titles. Each unit also contains important information on health and safety issues, including legal issues, as they relate to various personal care professions. Ethics as they ought to be applied to the personal care professions are also covered in some depth. As they progress through the course, students will learn about the educational requirements to pursue various job titles, along with how they will prepare themselves to become credentialed in a chosen profession. Most of the job titles discussed in this course will require some sort of professional licensure, and students are provided with detailed information on that subject. In some cases, job titles may require a credential from a recognized professional association. This information is also laid out in the course, and students are directed to where they can find additional information about education, training, and credentialing of personal care professionals. The course also provides important information about public and private options for education and how costs may differ. The introductory material for each lesson is designed to pique student interest in the lesson content, and this preparatory material is highly engaging and covers a wide range of topics. In many instances, the teacher can actually use the material that is in the lesson's introduction as part of the course content, since many of these introductions do contain additional useful information about the lesson's topic. Finally, the course has distinctive environmental and holistic health strands, which are also reflected in the final project, and the teacher can choose to emphasize this portion of the course and even augment it with additional material. Objectives • Explore the various types of personal-care careers. • Investigate the structure and function of the human body. • Discuss the types of interpersonal skills needed for personal-care careers. • Investigate careers in the beauty industry. • Discuss the education, licensing, and training needed for a career in the beauty industry. • Examine health and safety issues and legal considerations of a career in the beauty industry. • Explore careers in the bodily health support industry. • Discuss the education, licensing, and training needed for a career in the bodily health support industry. • Examine health and safety issues and legal considerations of a career in the bodily health support industry. • Investigate careers in the areas of body-mind movement instruction and group exercise and fitness. • Investigate careers in the funeral-service industry. • Examine health and safety issues and legal considerations of a career in the funeral-service industry. • Discuss the ways in which these various careers interact. This course has no prerequisites, other than a strong interest in learning about one or more of the careers covered in these lessons and the maturity to work independently to some degree. Students will need an Internet connection, pen and paper, and a computer that they can use every day. It would be helpful if the teacher could spend some time teaching or reviewing the skill of Internet research—specifically, how to know whether a source is reliable or not—since many of the projects require Internet research. The teacher might also wish to review the pros and cons of using Wikipedia—which can be a good source when the researcher catches an entry after it has been vetted by several people. It is also important to teach students how to find Internet sources that were originally in print. Since the projects also include different types of writing, including essay- and research-paper writing, it would be helpful for the teacher or a librarian to go over the basics of paraphrasing, quoting, rules about avoiding plagiarism, and so on. Students will need to choose a style book. The MLA or APA stylebook would probably be most appropriate. APA is often used for the social or applied sciences. Some of the projects also require students to conduct interviews, so the teacher might want to explain how to conduct an interview. Some of the topics to be covered might include researching sources, preparing for an interview (writing questions), presenting oneself in a professional manner, taking notes, recording the conversation, and turning the interview into an article. Students should have access to an anatomy textbook and can be encouraged to use the library to get additional books about the areas in which they have a high interest. For cosmetology, Milady or similar textbooks would be helpful. It should be easy to find books on massage, exercise, specialized mind-body disciplines such as yoga, Pilates, and various styles of martial arts, as well as more general books on the martial arts. Books on mortuary science might need to be ordered from other branches of the library if the local branch or high school library doesn't have books. However, advise students to use0.5
Personal Financial LiteracyElectivePersonal Financial Literacy is a semester-length elective designed to help high school students prepare for success in making financial decisions throughout their lives. Topics in the course address the advantages of making sound financial decisions in both the short and long term, income planning, money management, saving and investing, and consumer rights and responsibilities.

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Physical EducationElectivePhysical Education is a semester-long elective designed for high school students. The course focuses on performance of individual and team sports, with explanations of proper technique, rules of the game, and preparation. Team sports introduced include soccer, basketball, football, baseball, and volleyball. An introduction to fitness, strength, endurance, and nutrition is also included. Students will have the opportunity to perform each sport on their own time, while keeping a log of activity. The goal is incorporation of activity into their daily lives and the gain of lifelong healthy fitness habits. Throughout the course, students may be asked to answer questions or to reflect on what they’ve read in their notes. The notes are not graded. Rather, they are a way for students to extend their thinking about the lesson content. Students may keep handwritten or typed notes. Upon completion of Physical Education, students should possess the knowledge and skills needed to do the following: Define physical fitness and describe the components of being physically fit Evaluate their fitness level Apply physical fitness, nutrition-related, and weight-management skills to their lives Understand and apply safe exercise rules Describe the history and rules of sports such as basketball, baseball, football, soccer, volleyball, and gymnastics Describe and apply skills needed for a variety of sports0.5
Physical FitnessElectivePhysical Fitness is a semester-length elective designed for high school students. The course focuses on the health benefits of regular physical activity and of a long term exercise program. As students work through the course, they will learn about the many aspects of physical fitness, including basic nutrition, the importance of flexibility, cardiovascular health, muscle and strength training, and realistic goal setting. Along the way, students will be required to maintain and submit an activity log in order to measure progress in course exercises, as well as in personal fitness goals. Upon completion of Physical Fitness, students should possess the knowledge and skills needed to do the following: Analyze the key components of successful physical activity and use this analysis to determine if a program is reasonable and effective. Describe the three main types of physical activity that should be included in a exercise regime and the health benefits of each. Perform basic fitness exercises associated with the three main types of physical activity discussed in this course. Identify the main motivational strategies that can be used to help the student continue in positive fitness habits once this course is completed.0.5
PHYSICIANS, PHARMACISTS, DENTISTS, VETERINARIANS AND OTHER DOCTORSElectiveThis course focuses on preparation for physician-level careers, including dental, veterinary and pharmaceutical, along with a look into the Physician Assistant and alternative medicine systems. This course will also introduce the topics of diversity, and the move toward an emphasis on social and cultural skills in medicine, in addition to academic ability. These careers are usually the lead in the health care system, directing the care of their patients, whether that is through primary care, direct care, pharmaceuticals, or, if the patients happen to be animals! Generally, requiring a longer course of study and an advanced degree delineates these careers. Their programs are quite often competitive at the entry level. In this course, we will focus on the preparation for entry to practice, along with navigating the field once you are in it (working as part of a team, dealing with patients, etc). In order to help you to best choose your career path, we will study different roles, responsibilities, settings, education needs and amounts of patient contact. We will look at things like the degree or training needed for each job, the environment one would work in, how much money the position could make, and the facts of the actual working day. Then, within each job group, we'll explore important aspects that are applicable to the entire health field, such as behaving ethically, keeping patients safe and free from infections and germs, and following laws and policies. This course will also focus on diversity, and the need for social and cultural skills in medicine, in addition to academic ability. Lastly, some lessons will cover specific medical procedures and many will cover ongoing issues within the medical establishment, such as staffing shortages, new developments, and common arguments or disagreements. In addition to typical medical roles, we will look at veterinary roles, public health roles, and alternative medicine. The last unit will then include career exploration activities that will help you to make some choices and start preparing your pathway to a professional career. Objectives • • • • compare and contrast the professional degrees and fields of medicine on the basis of academic preparation, scope of practice, training, licensure, philosophy, lifestyle, and career options. explore the history of medical professions from ancient times to modern day practice. evaluate case studies for scientific content and issues of ethics, privacy, and legal limitations to practice create a personal plan for a professional career path.0.5
PLANNING MEETINGS AND SPECIAL EVENTSElectiveWelcome to Planning Meetings and Special Events. Being a meetings and special events planner is an important job that's both demanding and rewarding. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects this profession will grow by 43.7 percent between 2010 and 2020. It's not all fun and parties, though. In 2012, CareerCast ranked being an event planner as the sixth most stressful job, with soldiers and firefighters holding the top two positions. That's because a meeting coordinator is responsible for every detail of an event. Planners have to know how to communicate, be empathetic, and think of their clients. It's crucial to remember that in some instances the event will be a once-in-a-lifetime occasion, so it's important to get it right. Being a meetings and events planner can be an interesting career, one that you can be sure won't ever be boring. Objectives • Recognize the skills needed to work in this industry. • Develop generic skills that can be used in many positions. • Learn the acronyms of the meetings and planning special events industry. • Understand the great importance of accepting responsibility. • Consider the opportunities for pursuing a career in this field. This course starts with an historical overview and continues by equipping students with the skills and perspectives they need to plan meetings and special events. All resources and materials are online. The only prerequisites are the ability to write, think, and question. If there's an opportunity to do hands-on meeting planning, take advantage of it to put into practice some of the information you'll learn.0.5
PLANT SYSTEMSElectivePlant Systems is a semester-length high school elective that introduces students to the basics of plant biology, soil science, agriculture, and horticulture, along with the environmental management practices involved in each, including integrated pest management, biotechnology, growth techniques, and crop management. Students will learn the basic parts of a plant, how plants are scientifically classified, and how they interact with water, air, nutrients, and light to undergo the processes of photosynthesis and respiration. Plant reproduction, including pollination, germination, and dispersal of seeds, is also presented. Objectives • • • • • • • • • • • Explain the elements of both plant science and plant systems. Discuss current research in plant systems and in the growing of plants. Compare the different kinds of crops crucial to North American agriculture in terms of both purpose and biology. Implement an agricultural plan using the conservation methods of multiple cropping and integrated pest management. Understand the various ways plants grow from their roots and stems. Understand the difference between genetic engineering and cross-breeding. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of GMOs. Describe some current threats to agriculture that are not addressed by current precision technology. Describe the importance of high-yield farming in the 21st century. Compare the similarities and differences between sustainable agriculture, sustainable crop intensification, and conservation agriculture. Perform self-guided career planning using online resources.0.5
POWER, STRUCTURAL, AND TECHNICAL SYSTEMSElectivePower, Structural, and Technical Systems provides students with an understanding of the field of agriculture power and will introduce them to concepts associated with producing the food and fiber required to meet today’s and tomorrow’s needs. This understanding gives students the opportunity to explore agriculture machinery, as well as structures and technological concepts. Students will understand the historical changes in agriculture and how agriculture has changed to meet the needs of the future world population. Students will be introduced to machinery, structures, biotechnology, and ethical and professional standards applicable to agriculture power. Students will understand the technological innovations that have contributed to changing the face of agriculture. Computers and other technological tools have given farmers the ability to utilize precision agriculture. Students will gain an understanding of the professional career opportunities and responsibilities of growers across the country. Additionally, students can learn about some of the resources available to professionals in the agriculture industry. Objectives • Understand the field of agriculture power, structure and technology and the role that agriculture, food, and natural resources (AFNR) play in society and world economy. • Understand the interaction among ANFR systems in the production, processing, and management of food, fiber, and fuel, along with sustainable use and stewardship of natural resources. • Describe career opportunities and the means to achieve those positions. • Analyze how issues, trends, technologies, and public policies impact systems in the Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources Career Cluster. • Summarize the importance of health, safety, and environmental management systems in AFNR organizations. For topics in this course it is helpful for students to be familiar with general concepts of the world of agriculture, as well as the fundamentals of conducting research on websites. Students should be able to evaluate sources on the Web for validity. For some topics, students should be able to research the local community to locate specific businesses involved in mechanical repair. If students are not acquainted with these topics, it is recommended that they familiarize themselves with methods of Web research, including evaluation of websites.0.5
Principals of CodingElectiveThroughout this course, students are not only introduced to the basics and power of coding, but delve deeply into the thought processes behind designing technology.0.5
PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS AND FINANCEElectiveThis course will introduce students to the fundamental structure of the American economy, the complexities of the global economy, and the principles, practices, and strategies associated with starting, managing, or simply working for a business. Through a combination of lessons and projects, students will trace a trajectory of their potential role in the American economy as consumers, laborers, and executives. With lessons on everything from marketing to writing formal business correspondence, from the basic structures and legal definitions of business to the operations and importance of financial institutions, students will emerge from this course with a thorough introductory understanding of the business world. Students will perform research, conduct interviews, and write papers on various topics designed to enrich their understanding of the American business environment. They will also navigate an interactive and creative project that spans the length of the course and asks students to engage their learning, imaginations and individual career motivation with the course material. The course begins with an exploration of the structure of businesses and the roles and responsibilities of those who seek to lead and manage these enterprises. From this baseline, students are introduced to topics of particular relevance in our emerging global business environment including: the technology that fuels business success, the strength of free market economies, the cyclical nature of the economy and business, hard asset and financial management, and the personal skills necessary to become a member of the business community. Objectives • Understand the components of establishing a business. • Explore the issues of investment capital, legal and ethical issues, and budgeting. • Learn about the people side of business: human resources, group dynamics, leadership. • Acquire information on business communications. • Explore their role in the business world and how to present themselves successfully. Course Requirements Students should have access to spreadsheet and Microsoft Word software. PowerPoint or other presentation software would also be helpful to allow them to learn how to give presentations through this medium.0.5
PRINCIPLES OF TECHNOLOGY AND ENGINEERINGElectiveThe Principles of Technology and Engineering course will introduce students to the field of engineering and the types of technology that can result from the engineering design process. Student will also gain an understanding of the career options available in this field, and the skills, education, and experience needed to obtain these careers. Students will learn how to be successful problem solvers. They will become familiar with the steps in the invention process and will investigate the ways in which engineers take an idea from an initial concept to a working technology. They will learn about real-world examples of engineering innovations, including global civil engineering projects, cutting-edge medical technology, and environmentally friendly designs. Students will also learn about the relationship between engineering, science, and technology. They will learn how scientific knowledge is applied to create technology that benefits society. Additionally, students will learn how design modifications can be made based on an analysis of the underlying principles from physics, chemistry, biology, and the earth sciences. Objectives • Understand the field of engineering and the technology that can result from the engineering design process. • Distinguish the steps of the engineering design process and apply this process to solve a problem or meet a challenge. • Use problem-solving and critical thinking skills to construct a prototype that presents a workable solution to a problem. • Classify energy resources as renewable or nonrenewable and analyze energy usage and efficiency. • Recognize the social, health, environmental, and economic costs and benefits of renewable energy sources in comparison with nonrenewable energies. • Critique the technology that results from the engineering design process and suggest modifications based on scientific principles. • Define terms and phrases associated with engineering products and systems and use them to communicate their analysis orally and in written form. • Identify career options in the field of engineering, and explain the benefits and educational requirements for each option. For the topics and assignments in this course, it would be helpful for the student to have a basic understanding of the scope of scientific investigations, including the types of questions that science does and does not address. It will also be useful for the student to be familiar with conducting online research and be able to evaluate the credibility of online sources. If a student is not comfortable assessing the credibility of online sources, information on this topic can be found on a variety of educational websites, including library.columbia.edu and mason.gmu.edu.0.5
PsychologyElectivePsychology is an introductory elective course for high school students. Throughout the course students will examine influences on human actions and beliefs, factors influencing behavior and perception, and basic psychological theories. Students will develop and apply their understanding of psychology through lessons and projects that require interaction and observation of others. The course seeks to help students expand their knowledge and skills so that they may achieve the following goals: Discover that the findings in Psychology influence many other disciplines. Understand that theories develop over time and require validation to be accepted. Examine the various scientific methods and standards used in the study of Psychology.0.5
PUBLIC HEALTH: DISCOVERING THE BIG PICTURE IN HEALTH CAREElectiveIn this course, we discuss the multiple definitions of public health and the ways that these definitions are put into practice. We explore the five core disciplines and the ways that they interact to reduce disease, injury and death in populations. By understanding the roles of public health, we are able to gain a greater appreciation for its importance and the various occupations that one could pursue within the field of public health. Unit 1 introduces the definition of public health and provides a description that allows you to differentiate public health from other health care fields. The five core disciplines and the interactions between local, state, and federal organizations are also discussed. The history of public health concludes the introductory unit. Unit 2 focuses on specific information regarding the core disciplines of behavioral science and emergency preparedness and response. Unit 3 takes a detailed look at epidemiology and biostatistics. Unit 4 relates to environmental and occupational health issues. Finally, Unit 5 describes global health and the future of public health. Because of public health’s broad and multi-faceted nature, it is important to understand the details and the overall interactions and importance that make the field essential to modern society. There are many disciplines that work together on different levels within public health. Each public health worker contributes to the overall function of the field itself. By entering the field of public health, you will play an integral part in improving the health and lives of a large number of people. The contributions of public health to society have shaped our modern world and will continue to do so in the future. In this course, students will learn to: • Define public health. • Compare and contrast the scope of the various professions within public health. • Formulate a solution to current problems of public health. • Examine the role of public health in determining health policy. There are no formal prerequisites to this course. However, it is assumed the student will have access to the Internet and associated resources and will understand how to conduct research using the Internet. It is important the student learn how to discern correct and quality information on the web. Students will need to conduct personal interviews as part of their projects.0.5
SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS IN THE REAL WORLDElectiveScience and mathematics are part of the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) multi-dimensional strategy that can effectively sustain our twenty-first century knowledge-based economy. STEM careers provide a wide variety of opportunities to understand and address global issues. The most pressing issues of this generation include overpopulation, environmental degradation, pollution, and global warming. These are all subjects of intense and dedicated research by STEM professionals in very diverse fields. In this course, students will focus on how to apply science and mathematics concepts to the development of plans, processes, and projects that address real world problems, including sustainability and “green” technologies. This course also highlights how science and mathematics and the applications of STEM will be impacted as a result of the development of a greener economy. The course exposes students to a wide variety of STEM applications and to real world problems from the natural sciences, technology fields, and the world of sports, and emphasizes the diversity of STEM career paths. The importance of math, critical thinking, and mastering scientific and technological skill sets is highlighted throughout. Challenging and enjoyable activities provide multiple opportunities to develop critical thinking skills and the application of the scientific method, and to work on real world problems using STEM approaches. Objectives • In this course, students will learn about the many applications of STEM to real world problems. Using examples from a variety of STEM fields ranging from meteorology to sports medicine, students will learn about how STEM career paths provide opportunities for meaningful and challenging work. After completing this course, students will understand the STEM fields and the contributions made by professionals in these careers and will be prepared to begin to develop the specialized skill sets that will launch a successful STEM career. • Students will finish this course with an understanding of the basic scientific, mathematical, and technical skills that are necessary for success in virtually all STEM fields. Each student will develop his or her understanding of the scientific method, critical thinking, and applied math and science during the course. Additionally, students will develop their understanding of global issues such as environmental change and global poverty and will enhance their understanding of the interconnected nature of today’s global society. STEM fields play an important role in generating answers to many of the most pressing problems faced around the globe today. Students will learn about sustainability and how the STEM fields can be applied to generate sustainable, holistic solutions to global challenges. For this course, students should know the following: • Science and mathematics provide a myriad of opportunities for challenging, rewarding, and lucrative careers in the STEM fields. • STEM career paths develop out of a combination of academic and professional experience. • STEM provides effective tools to generate solutions to real world problems. Students should have the following: • An ability to access the Internet in order to review videos, articles, and additional educational materials provided throughout the course • An ability to work in group settings0.5
SCIENTIFIC DISCOVERY AND DEVELOPMENTElectiveThis course teaches students about careers in laboratory science while simultaneously instructing them on major concepts in the biological sciences. The curriculum is quite comprehensive and is spread over five units: • Unit One begins with a history of clinical laboratory science, which covers two lessons. These lessons lay the groundwork by explaining how clinical laboratories evolved and became professionalized and how scientific discoveries and breakthroughs fueled the development of the laboratory while the sub-disciplines in biology were also advancing. The science covered in the first unit includes immunology, the circulatory system, and the blood-bank system. • Unit Two touches on the circulatory system and gives more detailed instruction on microbiology and the subfields within it. • Unit Three covers cells and tissues and includes discussion of cell division as well as basic genetics. • Unit Four launches into research. A brief history of the philosophy of science is provided to students, along with an explication of the scientific method. The unit goes on to teach the difference between basic and applied research. This unit also covers three major areas in bioresearch: biotechnology, nanotechnology, and pharmaceutical research and development. • Unit Five culminates with research in the social science that is something of a hybrid, since the topics cross over into science. Emphasis is put on the interdisciplinary nature of this type of research. The last few lessons in the unit raise the controversial issues of embryonic stem-cell research and the problems raised by outsourcing clinical research. The final lesson gives students a chance to catch their breath and do some exercises that can help them find a career path they are interested in. The writer has taken pains to make the course interesting and relevant. You will notice that many of the introductory sections use cutting edge scientific breakthroughs, facts, stories, and anecdotes. Liberal use has been made of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. Richard Dawkins has also been tapped, along with the latest popular news about mitochondrial DNA and similar subjects. The course writer also keeps the level of content high while at the same time writing in an accessible and understandable style so that students can grasp the material. Still, it is a lot of material to grasp, and no doubt they will benefit from additional instruction that may be provided by their teacher. Students should come away from this course with a solid understanding of what goes on in a laboratory. Some of the science material will be new to some students, and for advanced students, some of the material may be review. But for the majority of students, the science content will be interesting and challenging. Objectives • Compare and contrast a variety of careers in the clinical laboratory and in research and development as to job description, education, training, certification, and licensure, and work environment • Evaluate the legal and ethical considerations inherent to professions in the clinical laboratory and in research and development • Summarize the pros and cons of controversial issues in medical research, such as stem cell research and the double standards for human subjects research in developing countries, and formulate a position based on a variety of sources • Review human anatomy and physiology as it pertains to the circulatory system and immunology, as well as basic cell biology, and genetics • Describe the major historical events in the development of the field of clinical laboratory science as we know it today Students will need an Internet connection, pen and paper, and a computer that they can use every day. It would be helpful if the teacher spends some time teaching or reviewing the skill of Internet research—specifically, how to separate the wheat from the chaff. The course makes liberal use of Internet websites and encourages students to do so as well. Projects are a mix of formats, including some dry labs, but many of them will be challenging, and students will need to do research to complete them. (If the teacher has access to a wet lab, some of the projects can be adapted; the teacher may also want to augment the course with his or her own wet labs if a lab is available.)The course includes quite a bit of writing, including formal essay and research paper writing. Again, it would be helpful for the teacher or a librarian to go over the basics of paraphrasing, quoting, rules about avoiding plagiarism, and the like. Students will need to choose a stylebook. The MLA or APA stylebook would probably be most appropriate. APA is often used for the sciences. Students should have access to a biology and anatomy textbook, at a minimum. They do not need to carry textbooks around, but they should be able to use textbooks as an additional resource when they need further explanation or clarification. Of course, their teacher will also be a resource. This course probably would work best with students who have already had a course in basic biology. However, that is not an absolute prerequisite.0.5
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCHElectiveThe course Scientific Research describes these activities from the point of view of a professional scientist. While this inside look should appeal to students of all ages, the lessons provide support, accessible ideas, and specific language that do not dumb down the content but rather guide students at their own pace through most of the steps, insights, and experiences they would eventually face if they continue through higher education toward a graduate degree. On the other hand, knowing the practical, everyday basics of scientific thinking and laboratory activity could also serve as a necessary first step to a career as a technician or a lab assistant. While these jobs are hands-on and technical, the intellectual and historical background covered in the course provides an awareness that is essential to working in such an atmosphere. Objectives • Identify research questions and generate testable hypotheses. • Design, conduct, and evaluate a scientific research study. • Apply the scientific method to the investigation of scientific questions. • Determine appropriate statistical tests based on type of data generated. • Report research findings. • Explore ethical considerations in research. This course is designed to help students develop a firm understanding of scientific exploration and a clear working knowledge of the scientific method as an integral tool for student-centered scientific research. There are no prerequisites for this course although students are advised to preview descriptions and design models that use the scientific method.0.5
SECURITY AND PROTECTIVE SERVICESElectiveSecurity is critical for the safety and stability of life in the United States and many other nations. The security and protective services industry includes companies and professionals that provide the strategic, managerial, and legal knowledge and skills that are necessary to protect property and people. The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the security and protective services industry. Students will understand different types of security services and how they relate to each other. They will also understand the distinction between the criminal justice system within the public sector and private security. The course begins with an introduction to the history of private security, with subsequent units focusing on a specific sector. The concluding unit focuses on the emerging challenges facing security services in the twenty-first century, including international terrorism. In addition, the course will provide information about many different careers that are available to students who are interested in security and protective services. Objectives • Understand the security services industry and the regulations, methodologies, and practices that are applied as well as the technologies that are available. • Recognize the different laws and regulations affecting the security field. • Understand the policies that are used to maintain safe and productive work environments, and the importance of technology as part of the overall process of security. • Construct ideas for overcoming challenges and issues related to security services and identify the different career paths related to the security and protective services industry. • Analyze the process of utilizing intelligence in crime prevention and security and the evolution of the security enterprise in the United States and worldwide. • Apply analytical methods to gather intelligence and information for sustainable security practices • Develop communication and critical thinking skills required for addressing complex security problems that have multiple perspectives and multiple vested interests. For topics in this course, it is helpful to students to be familiar with general concepts about security services as well as the basics of conducting research on websites. If students are not familiar with these topics, it is important for them to familiarize themselves with online resources for security and protective service concepts by visiting such sites as asisonline.org or securitymanagement.com. These websites will provide an introduction to important issues in the field of security and protective services.0.5
SMALL BUSINESS ENTREPRENEURSHIPElectiveThe Small Business Entrepreneurship course will provide students with an understanding of computer networks and how they operate, as well as a basic understanding of how to manage and maintain computer networks. These skills will provide students with the ability to design, configure, and troubleshoot networks of all sizes. Students will learn the basics of network design, including how to identify network requirements and determine the proper network architecture. They will be instructed on the requirements of network models, as well as be introduced to local area networks. Students will also learn about Internet Protocol and the basics of routing data on a network. Students will be introduced to wide area networks and network security issues. In addition, students will learn about network management, including monitoring and troubleshooting. Last, students will learn about network operating systems and their role in connecting computers and facilitating communications. Objectives • Understand computer networks and their functions, as well as know how to analyze business and technical goals of a network to effectively meet customer needs. • Identify requirements to successfully support network users, applications, and devices. They will also understand network architecture and topology, protocols, and services of local and wide area networks. • Identify principles and operation of equipment like wire and circuits, as well as of standards such as open system interconnection, TCP/IP, and high-speed networking. • Demonstrate knowledge of security requirements and data protection on a network, as well as the role of security tools such as routers, firewalls, and virtual private networks. • Understand network operating systems and be able to support computer networks. For topics in this course, it is helpful for students to be familiar with the basics of computer hardware (desktop and laptop), as well as desktop operating systems. If students are not familiar with these topics, it is recommended, though not required, that they be introduced to computer hardware and desktop or workstation operating systems before starting this course. That includes examining hardware devices such as motherboards, hard drives, and processing chips and exploring the features and functions of a workstation operating system.0.5
SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT TOOLSComputer TechThis course introduces students to the variety of careers related to programming and software development. Students will gather and analyze customer software needs and requirements, learn core principles of programming, develop software specifications, and use appropriate reference tools to evaluate new and emerging software. Students will produce IT-based strategies and a project plan to solve specific problems, and define and analyze system and software requirements. Objectives • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Understand the development of the computer. Be able to describe the organization of the Central Processing Unit. Demonstrate knowledge of widely used software applications (e.g., word processing, database management, spreadsheet development). Identity three levels of programming languages. Identity execution differences between interpreted, translated, and compiled languages. Describe how computers address data in memory. Design structures, classes, and objects that include variables and methods. Summarize how data is organized in software development. Understand the standard primitive types and operations of the java programming language. Define and initialize Java arrays. Demonstrate knowledge of the basics of structured, object-oriented language. Write software applications using while, do while, for, for-each loops. Define logic statements using if, else if, else and switch statements. Develop an application using conditional statements. Demonstrate knowledge of key constructs and commands specific to a language. Develop an application that responds to user input. Develop a web application that responds to user input.0.5
STEM AND PROBLEM SOLVINGElectiveScience, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) are active components in the real world. This course will outline how to apply the concepts and principles of scientific inquiry, encouraging the use of problem-solving and critical-thinking skills to produce viable solutions to problems. Students will learn the scientific method, how to use analytical tools and techniques, how to construct tests and evaluate data, and how to review and understand statistical information. This course is designed to help students understand what we mean by problem solving and to help understand and develop skills and techniques to create solutions to problems. Advanced problem-solving skills are necessary in all science, technology, engineering, and math disciplines and career paths. This problem-solving course stresses analytic skills to properly format problem statements, use of the scientific method to investigate problems, the use of quantitative and qualitative approaches to construct tests, and an introduction to reviewing and interpreting statistical information. Objectives • Understand basic techniques of problem-solving skills in the real world. • Learn to prioritize and evaluate complex problems using critical-thinking skills. • Understand how to analyze data to formulate a problem statement. • Understand how to apply the scientific method to the investigation of problems. • Understand the standards for constructing tests for research and the methods for gathering and evaluating data. • Understand statistics and models. • Demonstrate how to interpret statistical information and present meaningful research results. Students should understand how to research a topic through books, magazines, and the Internet. Students should have proficiency using Microsoft Word and PowerPoint, and a basic understanding of Excel.0.5
SUSTAINABLE SERVICE MANAGEMENT FOR HOSPITALITY AND TOURISMElectiveThis comprehensive course will cover the principles and practices of sustainable service management. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of socially, environmentally, and financially sustainable hospitality management. The course will provide a sustainable approach to service management, incorporating the role of the customer, employee, leaders, and the environment. After successful completion of this course, students will understand and be able to explain the fundamentals of sustainability in the hospitality industry. The student will: • articulate the importance of customer-centered service in the hospitality industry • know how to empower employees to create sustainable service • be able to describe leadership qualities that contribute to a sustainable service environment • be able to identify drivers of sustainable success in service businesses • understand how green policies and social profit benefit the planet and the bottom line This course does not require any pre-requisites and is self-contained. It does require that the student has access to the Internet for external readings and encourages students to utilize the library as necessary, but there are no texts required.0.5
Teaching and Training CareersElectiveThis course introduces students to the art and science of teaching. It provides a thorough exploration of pedagogy, curriculum, standards and practices, and the psychological factors shown by research to affect learners. In five units of study, lessons, and projects, students engage with the material through in‐depth exploration and hands‐on learning, to prepare them for teaching and training careers. Students are given many opportunities to be the teacher or trainer, and to explore the tasks, requirements, teaching strategies, and research‐based methods that are effective and highquality.0.5
TECHNOLOGY AND BUSINESSElectiveTechnology and Business is a year-long, high school elective that teaches students technical skills, effective communication skills, and productive work habits needed to make a successful transition into the workplace or postsecondary education. In this course, students gain an understanding of emerging technologies, operating systems, and computer networks. In addition, they create a variety of business documents, including complex word-processing documents, spreadsheets with charts and graphs, database files, and electronic presentations. This course provides key knowledge and skills in the following areas: 1. Emerging Technologies 2. Operating Systems 3. Word Processing 4. Spreadsheets 5. Databases 6. Communication Skills 7. Telecommunications 8. Electronic Presentations 9. Computer Networks 10. Project Management By the end of the course, the student should be able to do the following: • Select the appropriate technology to address business needs. • Describe and compare types of operating systems. • Use the computer's operating system to execute work responsibilities. • Identify the purpose and style of various business documents. • Create complex word-processing documents with columns, bulleted lists, tables, and graphs. • Improve speed and accuracy of keyboarding. • Use spreadsheets to calculate, graph, solve business problems, and make predictions. • Perform data-management procedures using database technology. • Demonstrate communication skills for obtaining and conveying information. • Send and receive information using electronic mail, following appropriate guidelines. • Describe and identify components of the telecommunications industry. • Create and deliver an effective presentation following presentation guidelines. • Describe the components required to establish a network. • Identify the information management requirements and business needs of an organization. • Use project-management tools and processes to manage a business project successfully.0.5
TECHNOLOGY AND RESEARCHElectiveThis semester-long course uses the topic of technology as a way to help students develop fundamental knowledge of the steps in the research process. During the course, students learn how new technology is developed and evaluate ways that technology affects society. Students learn about the development of the personal computer, robots, blogs, and wikis. They learn research and writing skills such as how to evaluate scientific journal articles, how to write an abstract, and how and when to use different online sources. A majority of the lessons contain optional activities for students. These activities encourage students to reflect on what they’ve learned. The activities are not graded. Rather, they are a way for students to extend their thinking about the lesson content. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to do the following: Define technology and describe how and why new technologies are developed Describe how science and technology are related Compare and contrast qualitative and quantitative research Develop and refine a research question List how and when to use different online sources Evaluate a scientific journal article Write an abstract Successfully write a 10- to 15-page research paper (at least 2000 words) Develop a creative way to present research information0.5
THERAPEUTICS: THE ART OF RESTORING AND MAINTAINING WELLNESSElectiveThis course focuses on careers that help restore and maintain mobility and physical and mental health, such as physical therapists, physical therapy assistants, occupational therapists, athletic trainers, massage therapists, dieticians and dietetic technicians, art therapist, neurotherapists, vocational rehabilitation counselors, and registered dental hygienists. Each career is explored in depth, examining typical job duties, educational and licensure requirements, working conditions, average salary, and job outlook. Key concepts and specific skill sets are introduced in the lessons, allowing students to apply what they have learned to health careers. This course is important because skilled health care workers are in high demand and expected to remain so for the foreseeable future. The unprecedented growth in this field is due to an aging population with more chronic conditions, new technology that has saved and lengthened lives, and increased demand for high-tech services. Students who take this course will come away with a broad perspective of the myriad career opportunities in health care today. They will understand how people in different health care professions interact with each other, and how significant expected growth in the industry can give them flexibility, good pay, and high job satisfaction. Objectives • Compare and contrast careers that help restore and maintain mobility and enhance physical and mental health. • Evaluate the importance of prevention and preventive services in health. • Assess the importance of education, training, certification, and licensure in different health professions. • Examine the roles and responsibilities of health care workers as part of the health care team. • Understand ethical guidelines and legal limitations inherent in each career. • Examine variations in scope of practice that can influence job descriptions by state. • Summarize the value of therapy in maintaining health and treating the whole person rather than just one part or a disease. Therapeutics Course Requirements Students will have to research different aspects of health care in the areas of science, medicine, social science, psychology, and microbiology. They also will be asked to find and summarize job-specific information such as licensure requirements in their state. Some of the tasks in the chapter projects ask for answers that can be found in the lessons themselves, while others require research using the Internet. Students should have access to a computer with Internet and a good working knowledge of how to find information on the Web. While sample URLs are usually presented as a starting point, the student should have a basic knowledge of using search engines to find specific information.0.5
TRANSPORTATION AND TOURS FOR THE TRAVELERElectiveWelcome to Transportation and Tours for the Traveler! This course looks at transportation and package tours. During this course, you will learn about the package tour industry today, the travel industry professionals, and the package tour customers. You will find out who tour operators have to work with to create travel products and what kinds of decisions they have to make in terms of meal, lodging, attractions, and, of course, transportation. You will read about how a tour operator plans and markets a tour and discover what happens before the tour, during the tour, and after the tour. Finally, you will learn about how technology, events like 9/11 and the global recession, and increased environmental awareness are affecting the travel industry today. By focusing on all of the different components that go into creating a tour, you will be able to get a sense of what working for a tour operator really entails as well as what other careers are available in the tour industry. Having this perspective will help you better understand the process you undergo as you plan your own vacations and give you the background to feel comfortable entering the tour industry. Goals and Objectives • To provide students with an understanding of how the tour industry is organized • To introduce the suppliers that tour operators must partner with and consider how best tour operators can foster positive working relationships with them • To learn how package tours are created • To understand how tours are marketed and promoted • To examine how tour operators arrive at prices for their products • To understand exactly how a tour operator prepares for, executes, and reflects on a tour • To critically think about current issues in technology and society that affect the tour industry • To improve students' oral and written communication skills • To improve students' critical thinking skills It is essential that you have access to a computer and the internet for this course. You will also need to visit and establish good relationships with several travel agents and other local organizations that serve tourists in order to complete many of the assignments.0.5
TrigonometryMathTrigonometry is a five-unit elective course for high school students who have successfully completed Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II. The materials cover a development of trigonometry from right triangle trigonometry to oblique triangles and the polar plane. Throughout the course, students will develop trigonometric formulas and use them in real-world applications, evaluate trigonometric proofs using complex trigonometric identities and solving trigonometric equations with regard to the unit circle. The course seeks to help students expand their knowledge and skills so that they may achieve the following goals: Use trigonometry as a tool for indirect measurement. Model natural phenomena with trigonometric functions. Perform operations with complex numbers using trigonometry. Use trigonometric identities to evaluate trigonometric proofs and solve trigonometric equations with regard to the unit circle. Solve for unknown sides and angles of right and oblique triangles using right triangle trigonometry, law of sines and law of cosines. In attaining these goals, students will begin to see the1
TWENTIETH CENTURY AMERICAN HISTORYElectiveTwentieth Century American History is a history elective for high school students interested in examining American history during a century of change, continuity, and conflicts. Students will examine America's economic, political, governmental, cultural, and technological growing pains during the twentieth century. They will also consider the causes and effects of national and international cooperation, competition, and conflict. This course seeks to help students develop social studies skills and expand their knowledge of history so that they may achieve the following goals: Understand that the interaction between continuity and change played a huge role in the events in twentieth century American history. Realize that change happens through times of conflict and cooperation. Develop an increased awareness of how history affects opportunities that are open to future generations. Analyze the numerous ways new technologies and innovation transform society and culture. In attaining these goals, students will develop insight and perspective on the themes and patterns of history and a greater understanding of today's world.0.5
Vietnam EraElectiveWhat comes to mind when you think about the Vietnam Era? For many, that period represents a difficult time in U.S. history. It is defined by an unpopular war that claimed the lives of 58,000 Americans and some 3 million Vietnamese. In this course, you'll look at the history of the Vietnam War. The roots of the conflict stretch further back than you might know. You'll examine why the United States got involved in the conflict and why the United States failed to achieve its objectives. The lessons in this course will help you to answer the following questions: Where is Vietnam? What is the history of United States involvement in Vietnam? What factors caused the Vietnam War? How did international events such as the Cold War play into the conflict? What was happening in the United States during the war? What was the outcome of the Vietnam War? What can we learn from the Vietnam War? Also, as you grapple with the material in this course, keep these questions in mind: What is worth fighting for? Why do people fight wars? How is military intervention justified? How are foreign policy decisions made? How does war affect civilians and soldiers? What ideas shape people's view of war? Your goals for this course include: Explain why the United States got involved in Vietnam. Identify U.S. objectives regarding Vietnam. Describe the United States home front during the Vietnam War. Identify the impact of the Vietnam War on soldiers and civilians. Identify the outcome of the Vietnam War. Explain the impact of the Vietnam War on American foreign policy.0.5
World GeographyHistoryWorld Geography takes students on a journey around the world in which they will learn about the physical and human geography of various regions. They will study the history of each region and examine the political, economic, and cultural characteristics of the world in which we live. Students will also learn about the tools and technologies of geography such as globes, maps, charts, and global information systems. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to do the following: Select and use geographic tools to get information and make predictions. Compare places based upon their similarities and differences. Identify geographic factors that influenced historic events. Evaluate the interrelatedness and interdependence of physical and human systems and their impact on our earth. Analyze the role played by culture in the spatial organization of the earth. Define the key geographic concerns facing the world and strategize methods to deal with these issues in the future. Students will also gain practice in writing and note-taking. They will be asked to create graphic organizers, conduct research, analyze information, and write essays on topics such as current events, energy resources, and national parks.1