Fuel Ed ALS

Researched-based curriculum.

A leading provider of research-based core curriculum instructional for kindergarten through adult learners. Our courseware is currently in use in over 15,000 public and private K-12 schools, charter schools, and after-school learning centers.

Learning Styles: Linguistic – Word Smart
Compatibility: Computer & iPad
Delivery Format: Web-based

Click any of the links below to view course descriptions.

Elementary

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
Language Usage I Building Vocabulary I Reading I Process Writing ILANGUAGE ARTSLanguage Usage Language Usage I introduces nouns, verbs, conjunctions, and adjectives, introduction to capitalization and punctuation, sentence types, contractions, and abbreviations. 470L

Building Vocabulary - This title is an introduction to sounds, long and short vowel sounds, special sounds formed by various letter combinations, using the letter as a vowel, silent vowels, the schwa sound, various diphthongs, initial and final consonants, like and unlike letters, blends and digraphs, basic sight words, word families, root words, and compound words. 640L

Reading I - Reading I introduces students to the identification of upper and lower case letters, vowels, consonants, patterns in consonants and vowels, classifying, word families, antonyms, homophones, compound words, synonyms, phonograms, prefixes and suffixes, introduction to nouns and verbs, predicting outcomes, interpreting feelings, drawing conclusions, story details, similarity and difference, cause and effect, spatial-position clues, charts, and graphs. 500L

Process Writing - Writing I covers writing complete sentences, recognizing simple sentences, sentence types, writing about a main idea, looking for errors, writing about personal surroundings, telling a story from a character's point of view, using descriptive words, and writing ideas and opinions.
Language Usage II Building Vocabulary II Reading II Process Writing IILANGUAGE ARTSLanguage Usage II - Language Usage II covers singular and plural nouns and verbs, subject/verb agreement, regular and irregular verbs, pronouns, adjectives, adverbs, grammar improvements, identifying double negatives, capitalization, and punctuation. 510L

Building Vocabulary II - Building Vocabulary II includes recognizing long and short vowel sounds in example words, review of long and short vowels, initial and final consonants, like and unlike letters and words, blends and digraphs, sight words, syllabification skills, dictionary skills, and special vocabularies. 780L

Reading II- Reading II covers consonants and vowels, verbs, nouns, plurals, pronunciation, root words, prefixes and suffixes, context clues, abbreviations, core subject words, analogies, sequencing, main ideas and details, fact and opinion, classifying, characterization, common expressions, story elements, purpose in writing, fiction, and nonfiction. 580L

Process Writing II - Writing II covers writing complete subjects, complete predicates, complete sentences, fragments, run-on sentences, the writing process, writing paragraphs, writing letters, journals, titles, story endings, details, sensory words, and figurative language.
Language Usage III Building Vocabulary III Reading III Process Writing IIILANGUAGE ARTSLanguage Usage III -The Language Usage III course reviews common and proper nouns, verb tenses, transitive and intransitive verbs, contractions, conjunctions, cases, pronouns, sentence structure, word order in sentences, simple and compound sentences, subjects and predicates, adjectives, adverbs, and tricky words. 600L

Building Vocabulary III - This title builds on the skills of recognizing long and short vowel sounds in example words, review of long and short vowels, initial and final consonants, like and unlike letters and words, blends and digraphs, sight words, syllabification skills, dictionary skills, special vocabulary words, base words, compound words, synonyms, and antonyms. 630L

Reading III - Reading III continues with a review of consonants, vowels, verbs, plurals, syllables, prefixes and suffixes, context clues, core subject words, abbreviations, alphabetizing, sequencing, classifying, recognizing main ideas, story details, tables, diagrams, graphs, fact and opinion, comparison and contrast, predicting outcomes, fiction and nonfiction, folktales and fables, reality and fantasy, literary forms, and figurative language. 620L

Process Writing III - Writing III reviews subjects, predicates, fragments, run-on sentences, recognizing sentence types, the writing process from pre-writing to publishing, letters, journals, descriptions, newspaper stories, titles, story endings, details, book reports, sensory words, expository writing, comparison and contrast, literary conventions, and figurative writing.
Language Usage IV Building Vocabulary IV Reading IV Process Writing IVLANGUAGE ARTSLanguage Usage IV -Language Usage IV reviews noun forms, possessive nouns and pronouns, present, past, and past participle verbs, predicate adjectives, demonstrative adjectives, prepositional phrases, introduction to sentence diagramming, parts of speech review, using direct quotations, importance of parallelism, and correct placement of modifiers. 620L

Building Vocabulary IV - Building Vocabulary IV offers dictionary and thesaurus skills and usage, review of sight words, parts of speech, words in context, analogies, Latin and Greek roots, word recognition, words borrowed from names and places, core word vocabulary, words used in testing, grade-level review of long and short vowels, silent consonants, sounds, and combinations. 790L

Reading IV -Reading IV focuses on consonants, vowels, verbs, plurals, pronunciation, syllables, root words, prefixes and suffixes, homonyms, words with multiple meanings, recognizing main ideas, cause and effect, characterization and other story elements, summarizing and paraphrasing, point of view, purpose in writing, common expressions, fiction and nonfiction, tall tales, folktales, fantasy, literary forms, and figurative language. Selected authors include White, Henry, Irving, and Emerson. 700L

Process Writing IV - Writing IV reviews and guides students through the writing process, writing sentences, writing paragraphs, specialized writing assignments including narratives, journals, letters, descriptions, titles, story endings, and book reports. This title also covers sensory words, expository writing, imagery, and analogies.
Language Usage V Building Vocabulary V Reading V Process Writing VLANGUAGE ARTSLanguage Usage V -In Language Usage V the course continues with a review of nouns, review of verbs including troublesome and irregular verbs, subjective, objective, and possessive pronouns, apostrophes, punctuation of bibliographies, titles, letters, dialogue, comparative and superlative modifiers, direct objects, identifying shifts in tense, diagramming simple and compound sentences, review of parts of speech, problem words, parallelism, and review of capitalization. 640L

Building Vocabulary V - This title covers parts of the dictionary, open and accented syllables, review of the eight parts of speech, synonyms, antonyms, homonyms, homographs, prefixes, suffixes, Latin and Greek roots, core vocabulary words, short and long vowel sounds, words that have the /ur/ sound, words ending in the letter "y," consonants, digraphs, and the /or/ sound. 830L

Reading V -Reading V covers sound-letter correspondences, blends, digraphs, diphthongs, review of vowels, verbs, contractions, plurals, word analysis skills including suffixes, prefixes, analogies, connotation and denotation, pronunciation and syllabification, comprehension skills including sequencing and classifying, recognizing main ideas, story elements, prior knowledge, reading selections to demonstrate setting, reality and fantasy, poetry, short stories, propaganda and bias, narrative and expository materials, and high frequency words. Selected authors include Irving, Burnett, Tennyson, Emerson, Twain, and Wordsworth. 790L

Process Writing V - Writing V reviews the writing process, writing using a variety of writing strategies, sequencing ideas, writing complete sentences, identifying run on sentences and sentence fragments, formal and informal language in writing, writing analogies, using the library to access information, summarizing, writing sketches, ideas and opinions, essays, poetry, drama, and folk literature.
Mathematics llMATHMathematics I is an introduction to mathematical concepts. The lessons cover numbers and counting, ordering numbers, ordinal numbers, addition readiness, vertical addition, subtraction readiness, number sense, vertical subtraction, fact families, word problems, addition sentences, subtraction sentences, identifying the operation needed to solve a problem, reading and creating graphs, identifying and counting coins, measuring length, weight, and temperature, telling time, three-dimensional figures, symmetry, and fractions. 500Lexile
Mathematics llMATHMathematics II strengthens mathematical skills in the following areas: numbers and counting, odds and evens, money and money strategy, graphing, addition and subtraction, using a calculator, measurement, telling time, solving story problems, fractions, and estimating. It also introduces students to measuring perimeter, congruent and symmetrical objects, probability, problem-solving strategies, logic, ordered pairs, multiplication, and division. The lessons also review reading time on digital or analog clocks. 570Lexile
Mathematics lllMATHMathematics III covers the following topics: addition and subtraction with regrouping, counting bills and coins, using a number line, using mental math, measuring length with standard and nonstandard measurements, using bar graphs, using a calculator, finding mean, median, mode and range, estimating and measuring capacity, time, and weight, reading temperatures in Celsius and Fahrenheit, multiplying three numbers, measuring area, dividing by tens and hundreds, adding and subtracting fractions, solving problems using pictographs, decimals, probability, plane figures, ordered pairs, identifying faces, edges, and corners, and using logical reasoning. 660Lexile
Mathematics lVMATHMathematics IV contains lessons covering the five-step process for problem solving, grouping addends, addition and subtraction, odd and even numbers, multiplication and division problems using money, using a calendar, temperature, writing decimals to the tenths and hundredths positions, line segments and angles, comparing maps and grids, comparing graph types, and formulating information into a story problem. 690L
Mathematics VMATHMathematics V covers exponents, standard, expanded, and word forms of numbers, writing decimals, adding and subtracting decimals, the properties of addition, the five-step thinking plan, multiplying two- and three-digit numbers, surveys, uses of line and circle graphs, Venn diagrams, least common multiples, units of length, elapsed time, lines and angles, circles, perimeter, circumference, pyramids, and probability. 730Lexile
The Sciences ISCIENCEThe Sciences I sparks the natural curiosity of young learners. The lessons present basic scientific concepts and definitions related to physical science, earth and space science, and science and technology. Colorful images provide visual reinforcement to enhance learning. This course helps students discover how we learn by using our senses to observe things around us. The students gain knowledge in understanding matter and machines, living and nonliving things, plants and animals, day and night, our earth's weather, and how we can be like scientists in problem solving.
The Sciences IlSCIENCEThe Sciences II course expands on the basic scientific concepts introduced in The Sciences I. Measurement, magnets, and forms of energy are introduced in this course. Students will study the effects of drugs and alcohol on people and understand how human activities such as burning the rainforests and clearing areas for development affect our environment. The moon, our earth's landforms, and the seasons are also studied. This course recognizes how technology has improved various inventions and methods of transportation.
The Sciences IllSCIENCEIn this course, more emphasis is given to understanding how scientists solve problems and organize observations and data. Students learn about science fair projects and the process of the scientific method. The differences between simple, compound, and complex machines are discussed at this level. Animal populations, habitats, and the food chain are explored by the students, showing the interconnection between all organisms and their environments. Students also study about our earth and the solar system.
The Sciences IVSCIENCEThe explanation of science fair projects and the scientific method is continued in the Sciences IV. The students expand their knowledge of inventions that have changed the world and explore careers in science. Investigations into magnetism and motion are also presented. Students explore the cell and its parts and learn about cell division. Lessons examine the changing earth including the rock cycle, earthquakes, and volcanoes. A distinction is made between inner planets, outer planets, and beyond the solar system. Included at this level is a discussion of computer terms, parts, and uses.
The Sciences VSCIENCEStudents gain understanding of the importance of research, observation, data collection, hypothesizing, and analyzing as used in the scientific method. Students discover the makeup of atoms and the composition of molecules, elements, and compounds. This course explores the relationship between magnetism and electricity and the various types of electric circuits. A study of the major human body systems and their functions is also included. An investigation is made of plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, and tsunamis and how they affect land formation. Students study climatic and geological natural disasters and how scientists monitor and prepare for them.
Social Science ISOCIAL STUDIESSocial Science I introduces students to the use of maps and geographic terms, the location and features of the continents, the land bridge, the first people in the Americas, detailed lessons on the Cherokee, Sioux, Chinook, and Eskimo Indians, the Stone Age, Bronze Age, Mesopotamia, Ancient Egypt, the Statue of Liberty, the bald eagle, the Washington Monument, the Lincoln and Jefferson Memorials, the meaning of the Pledge of Allegiance, government, liberty, human wants and needs, goods and services, and the use of money. 640L
Social Science IlSOCIAL STUDIESSocial Science II provides students with the following topics of study: map reviews, new geographic terms, the location and features of the continents, the New England Colonies, Middle Colonies, Southern Colonies, the founding of Jamestown, the significant events and leaders of the American Revolution, ancient civilizations of India, stories, cultural traditions, symbols, celebrations, the U.S. Flag, Presidents' Day, the Liberty Bell, the White House, rights and responsibilities of citizens, government in America, producers and consumers.
Social Science IllSOCIAL STUDIESSocial Science III covers the topics of Native American tribes, slavery, events leading up to the Civil War, the Missouri Compromise, the beginning of the Civil War, Reconstruction, timelines, calendars, Ancient Rome, the Byzantine Empire, the African kingdoms of Ghana and Mali, immigration, Ellis Island, the Statue of Liberty, United States Congress, human, natural, and capital resources, the distribution of goods and services, and the effect of climate on an economy. 680L
Social Science IVSOCIAL STUDIESSocial Science IV introduces students to the use of maps and additional geographic terms as well as Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Italian explorers, the importance of the Treaty of Tordesillas, Spanish explorations of Columbus, the search for the Northwest Passage, Cartier, colonization in North America, immigration to America, forced relocation of Native American tribes, timelines, the Bronze Age, Viking exploration, the Maya Indians, the Incas, the Capitol Building, Mount Rushmore, the role of money in the economy, and economic institutions. 760L
Social Science VSOCIAL STUDIESSocial Science V covers topics that include the use of maps, geographic terms, the lifestyle of Plains and Western Indian tribes, timelines from the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the English Revolution, the English Bill of Rights, Uncle Sam, the Presidential Seal, Washington, D.C., "The Star Spangled Banner," elections, the Electoral College, the Federal Reserve Bank, interest rates, and the use of credit in America.

Middle School

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
English Literature IXENGLISHCombining instruction in the areas of Reading, Vocabulary, and Language Usage, the English Skills courseware provides a complete High School English course when coupled with the companion Literature titles. The ALS Literature courses are composed of four titles that represent a guided study of a broad range of classic works of literature. The complete text of each of these classic works is presented within the lesson. Each lesson provides an introduction to the chapters that will be read and provides interactive study aids similar to a reference library in a classroom. The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson, A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens, The Odyssey by Homer, Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
English Skills lXENGLISHEnglish Skills IX contains reading sections with lessons covering common expressions, connotation and denotation, Greek and Latin words, poetry, word recognition, and story details and sequence. The usage section contains lessons about punctuation, clauses and phrases, and usage problems. The vocabulary section reviews vowel sounds and spelling.
English Literature XENGLISHCombining instruction in the areas of Reading, Vocabulary, and Language Usage, the English Skills courseware provides a complete High School English course when coupled with the companion Literature titles. The ALS Literature courses are composed of four titles that represent a guided study of a broad range of classic works of literature. The complete text of each of these classic works is presented within the lesson. Each lesson provides an introduction to the chapters that will be read and provides interactive study aids similar to a reference library in a classroom. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare, The Jungle by Upton Sinclair
English Skills XENGLISHEnglish Skills X curriculum includes reading sections and lessons about fact and opinion, folklore, inferences, story elements, and words in context. The usage section contains lessons about parts of speech, parts of sentences, and verbals. The vocabulary section reviews blends and silent letters
English Literature XlENGLISHCombining instruction in the areas of Reading, Vocabulary, and Language Usage, the English Skills courseware provides a complete High School English course when coupled with the companion Literature titles. The ALS Literature courses are composed of four titles that represent a guided study of a broad range of classic works of literature. The complete text of each of these classic works is presented within the lesson. Each lesson provides an introduction to the chapters that will be read and provides interactive study aids similar to a reference library in a classroom. The House of the Seven Gables by Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper, Moby Dick by Herman Melville, The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane
English Skills XlENGLISHEnglish Skills XI encompasses reading section and lessons that include American literature, context clues, farce and satire, and foreign terms. The usage section includes lessons about infinitives, clauses, verb tenses, and usage problems. The vocabulary section reviews consonants, syllables and pronunciation, and digraphs.
English Literature XllENGLISHCombining instruction in the areas of Reading, Vocabulary, and Language Usage, the English Skills courseware provides a complete High School English course when coupled with the companion Literature titles. The ALS Literature courses are composed of four titles that represent a guided study of a broad range of classic works of literature. The complete text of each of these classic works is presented within the lesson. Each lesson provides an introduction to the chapters that will be read and provides interactive study aids similar to a reference library in a classroom. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, Macbeth by William Shakespeare, Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte. 1040 Lexile
English Skills XllENGLISHEnglish Skills XII contains reading sections and lessons that include British literature, drama, etymology, genres and literature, literary devices, and propaganda and bias. The usage section reviews clauses and diagramming. The vocabulary section reviews root words and sounds of various letters. 1030 Lexile
Algebra 2MATHTopic areas of Algebra II: Include review of the real number system including rational numbers, rules for combining and multiplying real numbers, order of operations, connecting words and numbers through expressions, developing a plan to solve a problem, combining like terms, definition and examples of ordered pairs, grids, quadrants, abscissa, defining linear equations, graphing equation systems, three-variable equations, matrix multiplication, transformation, point and matrix transformations, polynomial types, zero as an exponent, finding higher variables, factoring numerators, and solving complex rationals. Continuing coursework from the Algebra II: Part 1, this title covers the review of square roots, radicals, complex pure and imaginary numbers, solving and factoring, identifying and evaluating the discriminant of a quadratic equation, rewriting equations, solving problems with number lines, graphing parabola, circle parts and formulas, hyperbola, graphing quadratic relations and inequalities, inverse functions, compound interest problems, sequences of numbers, identification of sigma, examples and definition of common ratios, finite series, and solving factorial problems.
GeometryMATHGeometry IA is a full semester course designed to teach students the first level of Geometry studies with lessons that are based on the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. All lessons have been designed to help students understand key concepts by applying real-world knowledge. Topics covered in Geometry IA begin with the basic geometric concepts of points, lines, planes, segments, and angles, then progress into increasingly complex studies that include formulas, proofs, theorems, congruence theorems, ratios and proportions, and polygons. Geometry IB is a full semester course designed as the follow-up course to Geometry IA, which is based on the Common Core Standards for Mathematics. All lessons have been designed to help students understand key concepts by applying real-world knowledge. Geometry IB continues to expand student knowledge of theorems, formulas, and proofs. The course then expands to include more complex topics such as sine and cosine, special geometric shapes, geometric measurements, and multi-dimensional figures and their translations.
TrigonometryMATHTrigonometry covers angles, angle terminology, reference angles, definition of sine, cosine, and tangent, definition and value of secant, cosecant, and cotangent, calculating sides of right triangles, using trigonometry to solve real world problems, the Law of Sines and Cosines, symmetry identities, verifying trigonometric identities, sum and difference for sine, cosine, and tangent, using cofunction identities, graphing trigonometry functions, principal values, arc length, area of circular sectors, simple harmonic motion, and frequency.
Calculus 1MATHCalculus I covers calculating x-values and corresponding values, limits, notation, continuous functions, asymptotes, negative and positive infinities, graphing tangents, secants, and cosecants, derivatives, Leibniz notation, constant functions and derivatives, functions that are products, the derivative as a reciprocal of sine, acceleration as a derivative of velocity, maximum and minimum values of given functions at closed intervals, using related rates to determine the volume of cones, determining graphing data, and antiderivatives with negative exponents.
Calculus 2MATHCalculus II topic areas include notations of integrals, the fundamental theorem of calculus, indefinite integrals and antiderivatives, integration by substitution, natural logarithms, points of intersection for regions of graphs, applications of the integral including volumes of rotation about the axes, arc length, surface area and work, hydrostatic force, inverse functions including natural exponent functions, exponential and logarithmic functions of other bases, exponential growth and decay, and inverse trigonometric functions.
Comprehensive BiologySCIENCEThis course, for students who have been introduced to biology topics in middle school, focuses on topics in cell chemistry and biology, genetics, evolution, the biology of living things, and ecology. Students use a combination of online instruction with animations, hands-on laboratory activities, reference book study, and collaborative activities with virtual classmates.
Physical ScienceSCIENCEPhysical Science offers several distinctive components: an in-depth examination of the biological functions of vision and sound in relation to physical laws, the impact of scientific discoveries on technology and society, and an overview of natural hazards, including the impact of humans on the environment. The Physical Science course covers the fundamentals of chemistry, matter, energy, and various scientific fields. The lessons are designed to move the student beyond the level of basic knowledge into critical thinking and learning activities.
PhysicsSCIENCEPhysics is an advanced level science course that includes the introduction to physics concepts, mathematics as the language of physics, scalar and vector quantities, acceleration, Newton's first law of motion, vectors, universal gravitation, mechanical advantage, thermal energy, types of waves, definition of sound, Snell's Law, atoms, magnets, the unit of charge, Ohm's Law, resistance, combined electrical circuits, how electricity is generated, and a brief review of astronomy.
US History IHISTORYU.S. History I is the story of America written in the rich history of the accomplishments of its people. America represents a multitude of cultures that collectively form a unified nation that has prospered for over two hundred years. This course is designed to bring the history of America to life by connecting the events of the past to today's world. U.S. History I is a first semester course that begins with an overview of European exploration of the New World. The birth of America and the framework of the Constitution propel the course forward through the politics, settlements, and growth of a nation. This course continues through the end of World War I in the early 1900s. Students will examine history by using the themes of culture, economics, geography, global connections, government, science and technology, and sociology and anthropology. Topics including: • European exploration • life in the English colonies • the Revolutionary War • foundation of the U.S. government, the Constitution, Bill of Rights, and political parties • presidents and first ladies • acquisition of U.S. territory and state powers • slavery and abolition • secession and the Civil War • the Trail of Tears • settlement of the frontier • American literature and authors • growth of transportation and technology • foreign trade and immigration • women's suffrage, child labor, and prohibition • World War I • Stock Market Crash
US History IIHISTORYU.S. History II is a second semester course that continues to show how events of the past are connected to today's world. Beginning with post World War I, this course examines significant events such as the Great Depression, World War II, the Civil Rights Movement, and the 2008 presidential election. Students will be guided through twentieth and twenty-first century events that have shaped our nation's society. Topics including: • the Great Depression • dictators in Europe • Hoovervilles and New Deal • presidents and first ladies • World War II • the European and Pacific Theaters of war • the Truman Doctrine • the Manhattan Project • the Korean conflict • the Vietnam War • Civil Rights Reaganomics • the Desert Wars • American demographics and technology • diversity in America
GovernmentHISTORYGovernment is a comprehensive, completely integrated Social Science course for grade levels 9-12. This course is designed to explore the history of government and the development of the United States government and political systems. The Government lessons examine the authority, structure, and rights of American citizenship through the establishment of government organizations and policies. Interactive media has been included to help engage the student in the visual learning process.
EconomicsHISTORYEconomics is a comprehensive, completely integrated Social Science course for grade levels 9-12. This course is designed to explore the history of economics, the development of economic theories, and the structure of American and global economies. The role of government in economics is closely examined, including topics such as the power to tax, fiscal and monetary policies, and the role of government agencies. Economic cycles and the impact of recession and inflation are discussed. Scarcity, supply and demand, and the importance of sound economic choices are taught with an emphasis on the manner in which these subjects may affect students and their economic futures. Interactive media has been included to help engage the student in the visual learning process.
AnthropologyELECTIVEAnthropology is a behavioral science that focuses on the study of humanity and culture. Anthropologists research the characteristics and origin of the cultural, social, and physical development of humans. They may also determine why some cultures change and other cultures come to an end. Students learn the foundations of the five main branches of anthropology including physical, social, linguistic, archeology, and cultural. They are provided the opportunity to apply their observational skills to the real-life study of cultures in the United States and around the world.
Art AppreciationFINE ARTSThe Art Appreciation course is a survey of painting, sculpture, architecture, and the elements of design. The history and art of past and present world cultures is introduced. The course is designed to enable students to identify, evaluate, and comprehend various forms and styles of art. The course also explores career opportunities in the various fields of art.
Career EssentialsELECTIVEThe Career Essentials course prepares students to deal with the various aspects of the job search such as resume writing, job interviewing, thank you letters, and prospective job offers. Objectives from elective courses are not tested on national or state achievement tests.
Humanities IFINE ARTSThe Humanities I and II lessons focus on the performing arts of music, dance, theater, opera, motion pictures, and television. Humanities, along with the social and natural sciences, represent the knowledge that humans have developed throughout history. Focusing on the philosophical, spiritual, and artistic aspects of life, Humanities explores the artistic and cultural accomplishments of individuals in the following academic areas: literature, religion, painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, art history, music, theater, film, dance, cultural studies of civilizations, philosophy, languages, ethics, and the classics of Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome.
Humanities IIFINE ARTSThe Humanities I and II lessons focus on the performing arts of music, dance, theater, opera, motion pictures, and television. Humanities, along with the social and natural sciences, represent the knowledge that humans have developed throughout history. Focusing on the philosophical, spiritual, and artistic aspects of life, Humanities explores the artistic and cultural accomplishments of individuals in the following academic areas: literature, religion, painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, art history, music, theater, film, dance, cultural studies of civilizations, philosophy, languages, ethics, and the classics of Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome.
Lifetime FitnessELECTIVELifetime Fitness is a lifelong pursuit. This course is designed to teach students basic concepts of lifetime physical fitness as well as give them experience with self-designed exercise programs. This course will allow students to investigate public resources that are available for understanding fitness and accessing activities from walking and hiking to kayaking.
Personal FinanceELECTIVEAn important aspect of every student's future is the ability to plan and implement sound and responsible financial goals. The Personal Finance course will educate students in a variety of financial and monetary subjects, including the foundations of economics, preparing a budget, understanding paychecks and tax deductions, banking, and the importance of researching the quality of goods to make consumer choices. Lessons of similar topics have been grouped into units to provide smooth transitions from one lesson to the next.
PsychologyELECTIVEPsychology is one of the behavioral sciences and encompasses the study of the human mind. Psychologists use laboratory research and observation to determine how people's thoughts influence their actions. Social psychologists focus on how members of a group interact with each other. Students examine how these interactions can lead the group to agreements and success or disagreements and failure. Students will also explore how people use their mental processes to learn, solve problems, and face the challenges of their daily lives.
SociologyELECTIVEThe Sociology course presents sociology as the behavioral science of groups, communities, and societies. The process of socialization, norms, folkways and mores, scientific research, social behavior, social institutions, culture, population, minorities, and changes to the informal and formal structure of the society are explored in depth. Students are led through a series of study units where they apply research strategies to the detailed examination of sociological data and statistics from numerous studies by various United States federal agencies.

High School

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
English Literature IXENGLISHCombining instruction in the areas of Reading, Vocabulary, and Language Usage, the English Skills courseware provides a complete High School English course when coupled with the companion Literature titles. The ALS Literature courses are composed of four titles that represent a guided study of a broad range of classic works of literature. The complete text of each of these classic works is presented within the lesson. Each lesson provides an introduction to the chapters that will be read and provides interactive study aids similar to a reference library in a classroom. The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson, A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens, The Odyssey by Homer, Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
English Skills lXENGLISHEnglish Skills IX contains reading sections with lessons covering common expressions, connotation and denotation, Greek and Latin words, poetry, word recognition, and story details and sequence. The usage section contains lessons about punctuation, clauses and phrases, and usage problems. The vocabulary section reviews vowel sounds and spelling.
English Literature XENGLISHCombining instruction in the areas of Reading, Vocabulary, and Language Usage, the English Skills courseware provides a complete High School English course when coupled with the companion Literature titles. The ALS Literature courses are composed of four titles that represent a guided study of a broad range of classic works of literature. The complete text of each of these classic works is presented within the lesson. Each lesson provides an introduction to the chapters that will be read and provides interactive study aids similar to a reference library in a classroom. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare, The Jungle by Upton Sinclair
English Skills XENGLISHEnglish Skills X curriculum includes reading sections and lessons about fact and opinion, folklore, inferences, story elements, and words in context. The usage section contains lessons about parts of speech, parts of sentences, and verbals. The vocabulary section reviews blends and silent letters
English Literature XlENGLISHCombining instruction in the areas of Reading, Vocabulary, and Language Usage, the English Skills courseware provides a complete High School English course when coupled with the companion Literature titles. The ALS Literature courses are composed of four titles that represent a guided study of a broad range of classic works of literature. The complete text of each of these classic works is presented within the lesson. Each lesson provides an introduction to the chapters that will be read and provides interactive study aids similar to a reference library in a classroom. The House of the Seven Gables by Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper, Moby Dick by Herman Melville, The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane
English Skills XlENGLISHEnglish Skills XI encompasses reading section and lessons that include American literature, context clues, farce and satire, and foreign terms. The usage section includes lessons about infinitives, clauses, verb tenses, and usage problems. The vocabulary section reviews consonants, syllables and pronunciation, and digraphs.
English Literature XllENGLISHCombining instruction in the areas of Reading, Vocabulary, and Language Usage, the English Skills courseware provides a complete High School English course when coupled with the companion Literature titles. The ALS Literature courses are composed of four titles that represent a guided study of a broad range of classic works of literature. The complete text of each of these classic works is presented within the lesson. Each lesson provides an introduction to the chapters that will be read and provides interactive study aids similar to a reference library in a classroom. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, Macbeth by William Shakespeare, Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte. 1040 Lexile
English Skills XllENGLISHEnglish Skills XII contains reading sections and lessons that include British literature, drama, etymology, genres and literature, literary devices, and propaganda and bias. The usage section reviews clauses and diagramming. The vocabulary section reviews root words and sounds of various letters. 1030 Lexile
Algebra 2MATHTopic areas of Algebra II: Include review of the real number system including rational numbers, rules for combining and multiplying real numbers, order of operations, connecting words and numbers through expressions, developing a plan to solve a problem, combining like terms, definition and examples of ordered pairs, grids, quadrants, abscissa, defining linear equations, graphing equation systems, three-variable equations, matrix multiplication, transformation, point and matrix transformations, polynomial types, zero as an exponent, finding higher variables, factoring numerators, and solving complex rationals. Continuing coursework from the Algebra II: Part 1, this title covers the review of square roots, radicals, complex pure and imaginary numbers, solving and factoring, identifying and evaluating the discriminant of a quadratic equation, rewriting equations, solving problems with number lines, graphing parabola, circle parts and formulas, hyperbola, graphing quadratic relations and inequalities, inverse functions, compound interest problems, sequences of numbers, identification of sigma, examples and definition of common ratios, finite series, and solving factorial problems.
GeometryMATHGeometry IA is a full semester course designed to teach students the first level of Geometry studies with lessons that are based on the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. All lessons have been designed to help students understand key concepts by applying real-world knowledge. Topics covered in Geometry IA begin with the basic geometric concepts of points, lines, planes, segments, and angles, then progress into increasingly complex studies that include formulas, proofs, theorems, congruence theorems, ratios and proportions, and polygons. Geometry IB is a full semester course designed as the follow-up course to Geometry IA, which is based on the Common Core Standards for Mathematics. All lessons have been designed to help students understand key concepts by applying real-world knowledge. Geometry IB continues to expand student knowledge of theorems, formulas, and proofs. The course then expands to include more complex topics such as sine and cosine, special geometric shapes, geometric measurements, and multi-dimensional figures and their translations.
TrigonometryMATHTrigonometry covers angles, angle terminology, reference angles, definition of sine, cosine, and tangent, definition and value of secant, cosecant, and cotangent, calculating sides of right triangles, using trigonometry to solve real world problems, the Law of Sines and Cosines, symmetry identities, verifying trigonometric identities, sum and difference for sine, cosine, and tangent, using cofunction identities, graphing trigonometry functions, principal values, arc length, area of circular sectors, simple harmonic motion, and frequency.
Calculus 1MATHCalculus I covers calculating x-values and corresponding values, limits, notation, continuous functions, asymptotes, negative and positive infinities, graphing tangents, secants, and cosecants, derivatives, Leibniz notation, constant functions and derivatives, functions that are products, the derivative as a reciprocal of sine, acceleration as a derivative of velocity, maximum and minimum values of given functions at closed intervals, using related rates to determine the volume of cones, determining graphing data, and antiderivatives with negative exponents.
Calculus 2MATHCalculus II topic areas include notations of integrals, the fundamental theorem of calculus, indefinite integrals and antiderivatives, integration by substitution, natural logarithms, points of intersection for regions of graphs, applications of the integral including volumes of rotation about the axes, arc length, surface area and work, hydrostatic force, inverse functions including natural exponent functions, exponential and logarithmic functions of other bases, exponential growth and decay, and inverse trigonometric functions.
Comprehensive BiologySCIENCEThis course, for students who have been introduced to biology topics in middle school, focuses on topics in cell chemistry and biology, genetics, evolution, the biology of living things, and ecology. Students use a combination of online instruction with animations, hands-on laboratory activities, reference book study, and collaborative activities with virtual classmates.
Physical ScienceSCIENCEPhysical Science offers several distinctive components: an in-depth examination of the biological functions of vision and sound in relation to physical laws, the impact of scientific discoveries on technology and society, and an overview of natural hazards, including the impact of humans on the environment. The Physical Science course covers the fundamentals of chemistry, matter, energy, and various scientific fields. The lessons are designed to move the student beyond the level of basic knowledge into critical thinking and learning activities.
PhysicsSCIENCEPhysics is an advanced level science course that includes the introduction to physics concepts, mathematics as the language of physics, scalar and vector quantities, acceleration, Newton's first law of motion, vectors, universal gravitation, mechanical advantage, thermal energy, types of waves, definition of sound, Snell's Law, atoms, magnets, the unit of charge, Ohm's Law, resistance, combined electrical circuits, how electricity is generated, and a brief review of astronomy.
US History IHISTORYU.S. History I is the story of America written in the rich history of the accomplishments of its people. America represents a multitude of cultures that collectively form a unified nation that has prospered for over two hundred years. This course is designed to bring the history of America to life by connecting the events of the past to today's world. U.S. History I is a first semester course that begins with an overview of European exploration of the New World. The birth of America and the framework of the Constitution propel the course forward through the politics, settlements, and growth of a nation. This course continues through the end of World War I in the early 1900s. Students will examine history by using the themes of culture, economics, geography, global connections, government, science and technology, and sociology and anthropology. Topics including: • European exploration • life in the English colonies • the Revolutionary War • foundation of the U.S. government, the Constitution, Bill of Rights, and political parties • presidents and first ladies • acquisition of U.S. territory and state powers • slavery and abolition • secession and the Civil War • the Trail of Tears • settlement of the frontier • American literature and authors • growth of transportation and technology • foreign trade and immigration • women's suffrage, child labor, and prohibition • World War I • Stock Market Crash
US History IIHISTORYU.S. History II is a second semester course that continues to show how events of the past are connected to today's world. Beginning with post World War I, this course examines significant events such as the Great Depression, World War II, the Civil Rights Movement, and the 2008 presidential election. Students will be guided through twentieth and twenty-first century events that have shaped our nation's society. Topics including: • the Great Depression • dictators in Europe • Hoovervilles and New Deal • presidents and first ladies • World War II • the European and Pacific Theaters of war • the Truman Doctrine • the Manhattan Project • the Korean conflict • the Vietnam War • Civil Rights Reaganomics • the Desert Wars • American demographics and technology • diversity in America
GovernmentHISTORYGovernment is a comprehensive, completely integrated Social Science course for grade levels 9-12. This course is designed to explore the history of government and the development of the United States government and political systems. The Government lessons examine the authority, structure, and rights of American citizenship through the establishment of government organizations and policies. Interactive media has been included to help engage the student in the visual learning process.
EconomicsHISTORYEconomics is a comprehensive, completely integrated Social Science course for grade levels 9-12. This course is designed to explore the history of economics, the development of economic theories, and the structure of American and global economies. The role of government in economics is closely examined, including topics such as the power to tax, fiscal and monetary policies, and the role of government agencies. Economic cycles and the impact of recession and inflation are discussed. Scarcity, supply and demand, and the importance of sound economic choices are taught with an emphasis on the manner in which these subjects may affect students and their economic futures. Interactive media has been included to help engage the student in the visual learning process.
AnthropologyELECTIVEAnthropology is a behavioral science that focuses on the study of humanity and culture. Anthropologists research the characteristics and origin of the cultural, social, and physical development of humans. They may also determine why some cultures change and other cultures come to an end. Students learn the foundations of the five main branches of anthropology including physical, social, linguistic, archeology, and cultural. They are provided the opportunity to apply their observational skills to the real-life study of cultures in the United States and around the world.
Art AppreciationFINE ARTSThe Art Appreciation course is a survey of painting, sculpture, architecture, and the elements of design. The history and art of past and present world cultures is introduced. The course is designed to enable students to identify, evaluate, and comprehend various forms and styles of art. The course also explores career opportunities in the various fields of art.
Career EssentialsELECTIVEThe Career Essentials course prepares students to deal with the various aspects of the job search such as resume writing, job interviewing, thank you letters, and prospective job offers. Objectives from elective courses are not tested on national or state achievement tests.
Humanities IFINE ARTSThe Humanities I and II lessons focus on the performing arts of music, dance, theater, opera, motion pictures, and television. Humanities, along with the social and natural sciences, represent the knowledge that humans have developed throughout history. Focusing on the philosophical, spiritual, and artistic aspects of life, Humanities explores the artistic and cultural accomplishments of individuals in the following academic areas: literature, religion, painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, art history, music, theater, film, dance, cultural studies of civilizations, philosophy, languages, ethics, and the classics of Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome.
Humanities IIFINE ARTSThe Humanities I and II lessons focus on the performing arts of music, dance, theater, opera, motion pictures, and television. Humanities, along with the social and natural sciences, represent the knowledge that humans have developed throughout history. Focusing on the philosophical, spiritual, and artistic aspects of life, Humanities explores the artistic and cultural accomplishments of individuals in the following academic areas: literature, religion, painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, art history, music, theater, film, dance, cultural studies of civilizations, philosophy, languages, ethics, and the classics of Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome.
Lifetime FitnessELECTIVELifetime Fitness is a lifelong pursuit. This course is designed to teach students basic concepts of lifetime physical fitness as well as give them experience with self-designed exercise programs. This course will allow students to investigate public resources that are available for understanding fitness and accessing activities from walking and hiking to kayaking.
Personal FinanceELECTIVEAn important aspect of every student's future is the ability to plan and implement sound and responsible financial goals. The Personal Finance course will educate students in a variety of financial and monetary subjects, including the foundations of economics, preparing a budget, understanding paychecks and tax deductions, banking, and the importance of researching the quality of goods to make consumer choices. Lessons of similar topics have been grouped into units to provide smooth transitions from one lesson to the next.
PsychologyELECTIVEPsychology is one of the behavioral sciences and encompasses the study of the human mind. Psychologists use laboratory research and observation to determine how people's thoughts influence their actions. Social psychologists focus on how members of a group interact with each other. Students examine how these interactions can lead the group to agreements and success or disagreements and failure. Students will also explore how people use their mental processes to learn, solve problems, and face the challenges of their daily lives.
SociologyELECTIVEThe Sociology course presents sociology as the behavioral science of groups, communities, and societies. The process of socialization, norms, folkways and mores, scientific research, social behavior, social institutions, culture, population, minorities, and changes to the informal and formal structure of the society are explored in depth. Students are led through a series of study units where they apply research strategies to the detailed examination of sociological data and statistics from numerous studies by various United States federal agencies.

HS Foreign Language

For credit foreign language courses are NCAA approved using the Middlebury curriculum listed here.

Course
Course Type
Course Description
Credit Value
HS Spanish IForeign LanguageHigh School Spanish I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to Spanish-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the Hispanic world. High School Spanish I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School Spanish I provides the foundation and path for continued learning.10
HS Spanish IIForeign LanguageHigh School Spanish II is the second level of high school Spanish designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts. They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate Spanish.10
HS French IForeign LanguageHigh School French I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to French-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the Francophone world. High School French I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School French I provides the foundation and path for continued learning.10
HS French IIForeign LanguageHigh School French II is the second level of high school French designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations and interactive activities. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts. They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate French.10
HS German IForeign LanguageHigh School German I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to German-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the German-speaking world. High School German I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School German I provides the foundation and path for continued learning.10
HS German IIForeign LanguageHigh School German II is the second level of high school German designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts. They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various German-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate German.10
HS Chinese IForeign LanguageHigh School Chinese I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to Chinese-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the Chinese-speaking world. Both Chinese characters and pinyin are presented together throughout the course and specific character practices are introduced after the first quarter. High School Chinese I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School Chinese I provides the foundation and path for continued learning.10
HS Chinese IIForeign LanguageHigh School Chinese II is the second level of high school Chinese designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Character recognition and practice are a key focus and students are expected to learn several characters in each unit; however, pinyin is still presented with characters throughout the course to aid in overall comprehension. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Chinese-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. By the second semester, instruction is almost entirely in Chinese. High School Chinese II is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate Chinese.10
HS Latin IForeign LanguageSince mastering a classical language presents different challenges from learning a spoken world language, students learn Latin through ancient, time honored, classical language approaches which include repetition, parsing, written composition, and listening exercises. These techniques, combined with a modern multimedia approach to learning grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, provide students with a strong foundation for learning Latin. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading comprehension activities, writing activities, multimedia culture, history, and mythology presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on engaging with authentic classical Latin through weekly encounters with ancient passages from such prestigious authors as Virgil, Ovid, and Lucretius. The curriculum concurs with the Cambridge school of Latin; therefore, students will learn ancient high classical styles of pronunciation and grammar in lieu of generally less sophisticated medieval styles, making it possible for students to comprehend the most Latin from the widest range of time periods. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, understand and analyze the cultural and historical contexts of the ancient sources they study, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).1
HS Latin IIForeign LanguageStudents continue with their study of Latin through ancient, timeh honored, classical language approaches which include repetition, parsing, written composition, and listening exercises. These techniques, combined with a modern multimedia approach to learning grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, prepare students for a deeper study of Latin. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading comprehension activities, writing activities, multimedia culture, history, and mythology presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. The emphasis is on reading Latin through engaging with myths from the ancient world which are presented in Latin. The curriculum concurs with the Cambridge school of Latin; therefore, students will learn ancient high classical styles of pronunciation and grammar in lieu of generally less sophisticated medieval styles, making it possible for students to comprehend the most Latin from the widest range of time periods. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, understand and use common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, understand and analyze the cultural and historical contexts of the ancient sources they study, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).1