Connexus

Aligned, project-based, and blended learning.

Pearson Connexus offers the widest range of content for K–12 learners with hundreds of proven, standards-aligned, online courses at a variety of course levels. Pearson Connexus also provides pathways to fit several instructional settings, flipped, project-based, and online and blended learning.

Click any of the links below to view course descriptions.

Grades K – 5

Grade Level
Course Type
Course Description
KMathMathematical thinking and problem solving are introduced in kindergarten. Students explore topics and apply mathematical practices outlined in national and state standards. They learn how to identify numbers, write numbers zero to 20, and count to 100 by ones and tens. They also describe, sort, and compare objects and learn basic shapes. Stories and activities introduce addition and subtraction. A combination of interactive and hands-on exercises teaches students about money, time, fractions, and measurement.
KLanguage ArtsIn kindergarten, students build a foundation for successful reading as they explore topics and apply reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills outlined in national and state standards. Learning activities combine phonics, listening, comprehension, and vocabulary instruction with daily exposure to books, including literature and informational texts. A combination of interactive and hands-on exercises encourages the development of fine motor skills. Students learn language skills as well as letter formation, and they practice these by drawing, dictating, and writing. By the end of kindergarten, many students will be reading, and all students should be able to recognize consonants as well as long and short vowel sounds.
KScience
KSocial StudiesStudents learn the concepts of community, nation, and world in this course. They answer essential questions including “How do people get what they need?”; “How is culture shared?”; and “How does life change throughout history?” A combination of interactive and hands-on exercises teaches students about personal responsibility, good citizenship, and basic geography. While learning about America’s past and important historical figures, students research their personal histories and heroes.
1stMathIn this course, students learn mathematical concepts related to addition and subtraction, measuring lengths, time, and representing and interpreting data. They also learn about counting, place value, comparing two-digit numbers, using models to add and subtract, reasoning with shapes, and parts of figures. Students use problem solving, reasoning, communicating, representing, and making connections to form mathematical concepts. The course supports the development of students’ mathematical thinking by building both conceptual knowledge and procedural fluency.
1stLanguage ArtsIn this course, students master key foundational skills. They are exposed to a variety of fiction and nonfiction stories organized into themes such as “Getting to Know Us” and “Our Community.” Examining literature through themes helps students make connections between texts and relate reading topics to personal knowledge and interests. Students build writing fluency by responding to various prompts, and they work toward mastery of standard language conventions through daily grammar and mechanics practice. The course teaches students how to communicate purposefully by giving them the opportunity to participate in collaborative discussions and take turns talking and listening carefully to a partner.
1stScienceThis course encourages students to explore the natural world. They study Earth, its resources, ways to protect the planet, and how plants and animals grow and change. They create a model of a mountain and investigate the way sunlight affects leaves. Students also learn about the scientific method and explore careers in science.
1stSocial StudiesStudents learn about the ways in which people contribute to their communities and work together to the benefit of all. This course explores the concepts of good citizenship, neighborhoods, and economics. Students also study maps, photographs, biographies, illustrations, poetry, and music to help explain the concept of communities and extend it to the larger world.
2ndMathIn this course, students learn mathematical concepts related to addition and subtraction, even and odd numbers, time, and money. They also learn about measuring length, graphs and data, shapes and their attributes, and place value using models. Students use problem-solving, reasoning, communicating, representing, and making connections to form mathematical concepts. The course supports the development of students’ mathematical thinking by building both conceptual knowledge and procedural fluency.
2ndLanguage ArtsIn this course, students develop reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills essential for future success. Students expand their vocabularies while using an array of strategies—including main idea, problem and solution, and author’s purpose—to comprehend complex texts. A variety of stories are organized into relevant themes such as friends and family, live and learn, and our life/our world. Students enjoy daily independent reading routines. Additionally, they use the writing process to produce various compositions including narrative texts, informative texts, and opinion texts. Students also master standard language conventions through daily grammar and mechanics practice. Engaging activities and discussions help students become proficient listeners and speakers.
2ndScienceThis course stimulates students’ curiosity about the world around them. They investigate energy and changing states of matter, such as liquid water changing to water vapor, and they create a weather chart. Students enjoy hands-on and virtual activities as they investigate the importance of water and vegetation in life science and explore forces in physical science.
2ndSocial StudiesStudents explore basic concepts of history, geography, economics, and government while discovering more about world cultures. Students practice basic map, chart, graph, and critical-thinking skills. They also learn about ordinary people who demonstrate good citizenship and famous people who have influenced the United States and the world.
3rdLanguage ArtsIn this course, students use critical thinking and reading comprehension skills to analyze texts. Using a multi-draft reading approach, students make connections between their readings and the world. They will be asked questions such as, “How can learning help us grow?” and “What are ways people can take action?” Through the five-stage writing process—prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing—students practice writing quality sentences and well-organized compositions. Daily reading and writing activities help students continue to master spelling, grammar, and language skills. Students will also learn the strokes of cursive handwriting.
3rdMathIn this course, students learn mathematical concepts related to multiplication and division, patterns, rounding, and mental math. They also learn about 2-D shapes, area, perimeter, fractions, interpreting data, time, mass, and capacity. Students use problem solving, reasoning, communicating, representing, and making connections to form mathematical concepts. The course supports the development of students’ mathematical thinking by building both conceptual knowledge and procedural fluency.
3rdScienceStudents explore the living world and the sky above. In life science, students begin by analyzing things that make up the living world and then study life cycles and ecosystems. They study the composition of Earth as well as its location in relation to the sun and moon. In physical science, students investigate the properties of matter.
3rdSocial StudiesThis course focuses on the theme of community, with an emphasis on history, civics, economics, and geography. Students compare communities and examine the American political system, including the Declaration of Independence, the US Constitution, and the three branches of government, all within the context of a citizen’s rights and responsibilities. Students are introduced to economics by studying money, prices, and supply and demand, with a special emphasis on making good personal economic decisions.
4thLanguage ArtsIn this course, students use critical thinking and reading comprehension skills to analyze texts. Using a multi-draft reading approach, students make connections between their readings and the world. They will be asked questions such as, “How can a challenge bring out our best?” and “How do different writers treat the same topic?” Through the five-stage writing process—prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing—students practice writing quality sentences and well-organized compositions. Daily reading and writing activities help students continue to master spelling, grammar, and language skills. Students will also learn the strokes of cursive handwriting.
4thMathIn this course, students learn mathematical concepts related to place value, adding and subtracting multi-digit whole numbers, strategies for multiplication and division, factors, multiples, algebra, and patterns. They also learn about fraction equivalence, calculating fractions, comparing decimals, interpreting data, angles, lines, shapes, and measurement. Students use problem solving, reasoning, communicating, representing, and making connections to form mathematical concepts. The course supports the development of students’ mathematical thinking by building both conceptual knowledge and procedural fluency.
4thScienceStudents in this course use the scientific method to perform hands-on and virtual explorations. In the area of life science, they explore the differences and similarities among organisms. In Earth science, students investigate the differences between rocks and minerals and explore forces and forms of energy. Students are also introduced to the idea of a career in science.
4thSocial StudiesA regional approach is used to examine the geography and history of the United States in this course. During their studies, students learn how to use different types of maps and apply geographic skills and concepts. The course emphasizes the role of the individual in the community and the concept of change over time. (Course may vary by state.)
5thLanguage ArtsIn this course, students use critical thinking and reading comprehension skills to analyze texts. Using a multi-draft reading approach, students make connections between their readings and the world. They will be asked questions such as, “What kinds of experiences can lead to new discoveries?” and “How do we decide what’s important?” Through the five-stage writing process—prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing—students practice writing quality sentences and well-organized compositions. Daily reading and writing activities help students continue to master spelling, grammar, and language skills. Students will also learn the strokes of cursive handwriting.
5thMathIn this course, students learn mathematical concepts related to place value, adding and subtracting decimals, using models to multiply and divide, the coordinate plane, algebra, patterns, and relationships. They also learn about 2-D figures, operations with fractions, volume, converting measurements, interpreting data, and equivalent expressions. Students use problem solving, reasoning, communicating, representing, and making connections to form mathematical concepts. The course supports the development of students’ mathematical thinking by building both conceptual knowledge and procedural fluency.
5thScienceStudents continue to sharpen their investigative skills. In life science, students examine the living world; in physical science, they explore characteristics of matter, sound, and light. Students also learn about the Earth’s composition and the forces that shape its surface. The scientific method is reinforced, and careers in science are discussed.
5thSocial StudiesIn this course, students trace the history of the United States from the earliest Americans to the 21st century. Students practice map skills as they chart the growth of the nation and develop their ability to compare, sequence events, and interpret sources. Students also study how geography has affected culture and historic events.

Grades 6 – 8

Grade Level/Course
Course Type
Course Description
6thMathStudents connect ratio and rate to whole number multiplication and division and also use the concepts of ratio and rate to solve problems. In addition, they expand t heir ability to divide fractions and to write, interpret, and apply expressions and equations. They also develop an understanding of statistical thinking.
6thLanguage ArtsThrough the study of authors such as Elizabeth Partridge, Gary Soto, and Langston Hughes, students ponder such questions as “Is conflict always bad?”; “How do w e decide who we are?”; and “How much do our communities shape us?” Short-term research engages students’ curiosity and critical-thinking skills. Students are encouraged to support their ideas with evidence as they practice narrative, informative, and persuasive writing.
6thScience This media-rich science course enable students t o engage actively in inquiry-based investigations and science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) projects, as well as cross-disciplinary and cross-curricular activities. Students are encouraged to make connections, collaborate, and reflect on t heir learning as they work through the content.
6thSocial StudiesStudents focus on ancient civilizations. T hey begin by understanding a historian’s role and utilizing t he tools and skills he or she would use, including analyzing timelines, studying geography, and evaluating multiple sources. Students trace how societies shifted from hunting and gathering to farming. They also trace the development o f ancient China, India, Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Italy. Students enhance their critical thinking by interpreting primary sources and reading eyewitness accounts to draw conclusions.
7thMathStudents build on their knowledge of proportional relationships and operations with rational numbers. They solve real-world problems involving scale drawings, geometric constructions, area, surface area, and volume. Students also draw inferences about populations based on samples.
7thLanguage ArtsBy studying authors such as Amy Tan, Emily Dickinson, and Laurence Yep, students ponder such questions as “Does every conflict have a winner?”; “What is t he best way to communicate?”; and “Do others see us more clearly than we see ourselves?” Short- and long-term research engages their curiosity and critical-thinking skills. Students are encouraged to integrate knowledge and ideas into their work a s they practice narrative, informative, and persuasive writing.
7thScience This media-rich science course enable students t o engage actively in inquiry-based investigations and science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) projects, as well as cross-disciplinary and cross-curricular activities. Students are encouraged to make connections, collaborate, and reflect on t heir learning as they work through the content.
7thSocial StudiesStudents study political, economic, and social changes from the fifth century to modern times. They utilize their critical-thinking skills by making connections between historical events, such as the rise and fall of empires and the rise of democracy, and by analyzing long-term changes and recurring patterns in world history. Students complete a comprehensive study of the history, geography, and cultures of nations in North and South America. Thinking a s historians, they analyze timelines, read primary source documents, form hypotheses, and draw conclusions.
8thLanguage ArtsThrough the study of authors such as Nikki Giovanni, Elie Wiesel, and Mark Twain, students ponder such questions as “Can all conflicts be resolved?”; “Is it our differences or our similarities that matter most?”; and “ Are yesterday’s heroes important today?” Students exercise t heir curiosity and critical-thinking skills through short- and long-term research. They refine and reinforce their skills by practicing narrative, informative, and persuasive writing.
8thScience This media-rich science course enable students t o engage actively in inquiry-based investigations and science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) projects, as well as cross-disciplinary and cross-curricular activities. Students are encouraged to make connections, collaborate, and reflect on t heir learning as they work through the content. A s students advance through the courses, they receive an internationally benchmarked science education that covers the topics listed below. Because each course is designed to meet state-based standards, the sequence of content will vary by state and may include the following: · Structure of the cell
· Organism systems and information processing in the body
· Transfer of matter and energy in organisms and ecosystems
· Interdependent relationships in ecosystems
· Natural selection and adaptations
· Growth, development, and reproduction of organisms
· Earth and space systems
· Earth’s surface and interior processes
· Weather and climate
· Human impact on Earth
· Structure and properties of matter
· Chemical reactions
· Forces, energy, and motion
· Waves and electromagnetic radiation
8thSocial StudiesIn this course, students study the history o f the North American continent. The course covers the early cultures that thrived in the Americas for thousands of years, t he European exploration and colonization of the continent, and the subsequent rise of the United States. Students learn a bout the Civil War and the Reconstruction that followed. The course traces the advances made over the last century and a h alf and the role the United States has played in a changing world.
Algebra 1MathIn this course, students explore the properties o f real numbers and apply this knowledge to equations, inequalities, and multi-step equations. Students learn to identify, write, and graph functions and equations, simplify radical expressions, and solve quadratic equations. They l earn to factor and perform operations with binomials and polynomials. Students calculate slope and use slope-intercept form to graph linear equations. They also learn to solve systems of equations and inequalities both graphically and algebraically. This course is offered to qualified students.
Pre-AlgebraMathStudents prepare for algebra as they expand t heir understanding of expressions and equations. They solve linear equations and systems of linear equations, use f unctions to describe quantitative relationships, and analyze two- and three-dimensional space and figures.

Grades 9 – 12

Math

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
Course Credit
AG Accredited (Y/N)
Advanced Algebra with Financial ApplicationsMathIn this​ ​course, students explore the properties of real numbers and​ ​apply this knowledge to equations, inequalities, and multistep​ ​equations. Students learn to identify, write, and graph​ ​functions and equations, simplify radical expressions, and​ ​solve quadratic equations. They learn to factor and perform​ ​operations with binomials and polynomials. Students calculate​ ​slope and use slope-intercept form to graph linear equations.​ ​They also learn to solve systems of equations and inequalities​ ​both graphically and algebraically. This course is offered to​ ​qualified students.10N
Algebra 1MathStudents learn about the properties of real​ ​numbers and apply their knowledge to equations, inequalities,​ ​and multi-step equations. They move on to identify, write, and graph functions and equations; simplify radical expressions;​ ​solve quadratic equations; and factor and perform operations​ ​with binomials and polynomials. Students calculate slope and​ ​use the slope-intercept form to graph linear equations. They​ ​also learn to solve systems of equations and inequalities both​ ​graphically and algebraically.10Y
Algebra 2MathStudents engage in high-level mathematical​ ​discussions and apply algebraic concepts to real-world​ ​scenarios as they build on prior knowledge of functions,​ ​systems of equations, the quadratic formula, and factoring.​ ​Students also continue to study arithmetic and geometric​ ​sequences and series, probability and statistics, and​ ​trigonometric identities and equations.10Y
CalculusMathStudents study limits, continuity, and differentiation​ ​while exploring integrated algebraic, trigonometric,​ ​and transcendental functions and the applications of​ ​derivatives and integrals. Major topics and concepts include​ ​differentiation and integration rules, rates of change, derivative​ ​tests, and differential equations. A TI-83+ or TI-84+ graphing​ ​calculator is strongly recommended, but it is not provided by​ ​Connections Academy.10Y
Consumer MathMathStudents focus on math skills and​ ​problem-solving strategies that are relevant to practical financial applications. Topics include planning and managing​ ​a budget, avoiding common financial pitfalls, and posing​ ​questions to businesses and companies. Students also​ ​learn to examine their own spending behavior and evaluate​ ​purchasing decisions.10N
Explorations in MathematicsMathStudents delve into​ ​fundamental math concepts and apply them to real-life​ ​situations. Topics covered include prime factorization,​ ​operations with rational numbers and integers, solving​ ​equations, properties of real numbers, and basic statistics.​ ​The goal of this course is to establish a solid base for the study​ ​of more advanced math.5N
GeometryMathThis course guides students through the​ ​exploration of geometric figures. They analyze plane figures​ ​and three-dimensional figures and apply formulas to​ ​calculate area, surface area, and volume. They learn how​ ​to use inductive and deductive logic to conduct formal proofs through predictions, counterexamples, and drawing​ ​conclusions. Students also conduct detailed analyses of​ ​the properties of parallel and perpendicular lines, triangles, polygons, quadrilaterals, and circles, including similarity and​ ​transformations.10Y
Integrated Math 1MathThis course teaches students how to​ ​simplify expressions and solve linear equations, introduces​ ​basic geometric terms and logic, reasoning, and proof and​ ​addresses linear equations in a graphical sense, and parallel​ ​and perpendicular lines, first from an algebraic perspective,​ ​followed by proving associated theorems using geometry.​ ​This course also teaches students how to solve proportions,​ ​use square roots, explore exponents, simplify polynomials,​ ​factor and solve quadratic equations, and apply these skills to​ ​geometry topics such as quadrilaterals, polygons,​ ​area, and volume.10Y
Integrated Math 2MathThis course teaches students about linear​ ​equations and inequalities, functions and families of functions,​ ​triangles, and how to apply their knowledge to solve systems​ ​and prove theorems. This course also teaches students about​ ​geometrical relationships in triangles and plane figures, special​ ​right triangles, basic trigonometry, radicals, polynomials,​ ​rational equations, probability and statistics.10Y
Integrated Math 3MathThis course reviews graphing in the​ ​coordinate plane, graphical and algebraic approaches to​ ​solving systems of equations and constructions, isometric​ ​transformations, symmetry, and dilations. This course also​ ​teaches students about a variety of nonlinear relationships, circles and conic sections, arithmetic and geometric sequences​ ​and series, and how to solve quadratic equations.10Y
Integrated Math 4MathIn this course students will learn about​ ​analyzing data, standard deviation, and normal distributions.​ ​They will also learn about arithmetic and geometric sequences​ ​and their series, rational and inverse functions, radians,​ ​degrees, and the unit circle. This course also teaches students​ ​about trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities, sum and difference formulas,​ ​applications of trigonometry, polar coordinates, and vectors.​ ​They will also learn about functions, polynomial functions, exponential functions, and logarithmic functions.10N
Math Models with ApplicationsMathHave you ever been​ ​“watched” by a store? It sounds creepy, doesn’t it? Most​ ​stores have surveillance cameras on their premises to​ ​prevent goods from being stolen, but many stores watch​ ​their customers in another way. This involves collecting​ ​data on consumers to the point of “knowing” them. Some​ ​stores can even predict what you are going to purchase and​ ​offer you coupons or other promotions. Math Models with​ ​Applications, a one-semester course, focuses on data and​ ​its many uses in the real world. You will begin by discussing​ ​several types of graphs, which are ways to represent data.​ ​Next, you will explore strategies for interpreting data,​ ​methods for collecting data, and techniques for analyzing and using data. In conclusion, you will get an in-depth look at​ ​probability and probability models.10N
Pre-AlgebraMathIn this course, students are provided​ ​with a solid foundation for success in future high school​ ​mathematics. They refine their operational skills as they​ ​work with exponents, fractions, decimals, and integers, and​ ​they learn to use variables and expressions to write and​ ​solve equations and inequalities. Students are introduced to​ ​relations and functions, as well as multi-step equations, which​ ​they learn to solve and graph. Units on geometric skills focus​ ​on development of spatial thinking and an understanding of​ ​basic geometric terms and formulas.​ ​(This course is not offered at all schools.)10N
Pre-CalculusMathIn this course, students analyze various​ ​functions. They study quadratics, sequences, and series.​ ​Students expand their knowledge of trigonometric concepts​ ​and explore vectors and parametric equations. Finally,​ ​students examine concepts, including limits and derivatives, in​ ​preparation for their study of calculus. Throughout the course,​ ​lessons focus on ways in which mathematics is applied in the​ ​real world and is essential to everyday life. This, combined​ ​with an emphasis on mathematical reasoning and critical thinking​ ​skills, prepares students for future college and career​ ​opportunities.10Y
StatisticsMathThis course addresses descriptive statistics topics​ ​including frequency distributions, histograms, graphs, and​ ​measures of center and spread. Probability topics include​ ​addition rules, multiplication rules, conditional probabilities,​ ​counting rules, binomial distribution, and normal distribution.​ ​Inferential statistics topics include estimations for population measures, hypothesis testing, correlation, goodness-of-fit,​ ​and statistical process control.10Y
TrigonometryMathThis course addresses analyzing functions,​ ​transformations, and inverse functions. Students will​ ​also learn about radians, the unit circle, right-triangle​ ​trigonometry, trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric​ ​functions, trigonometric identities, and trigonometric​ ​equations. Additional topics include vectors, conic sections,​ ​parametric curves, and the polar coordinate system.5Y

Language Arts

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
Course Credit
AG Accredited (Y/N)
English 10Language ArtsThe timeless themes in world literature are​ ​emphasized in English 10, drawing from literature of the​ ​Americas, Europe, the Middle East, Asia, the Pacific Rim, and​ ​Africa. A classic world literature selection introduces each​ ​region, followed by short fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and/​ ​or drama. Students explore the cultures surrounding each​ ​piece of literature and consider the similarities that unite the​ ​human family. The survey of world literature includes works​ ​by Margaret Atwood, Pablo Neruda, and Eugène Ionesco. Students continue to strengthen their mastery of the writing​ ​process and compose for various purposes. Skills are further​ ​developed, including the research process and oral communication.10Y
English 11Language ArtsStudents focus on the literary movements​ ​that comprise American literature and trace the chronology​ ​of national literature from the early American and colonial​ ​period through the contemporary period. Students read​ ​selections from the Native American oral tradition; seminal​ ​historical documents and essays; and fiction, nonfiction,​ ​poetry, and drama. The survey of American authors includes​ ​Mark Twain, Ralph Ellison, and Julia Alvarez. Students continue​ ​to strengthen and apply higher-level critical reading, literary​ ​analysis, and research skills through the use of graphic​ ​organizers and note-taking strategies.10Y
English 12Language ArtsStudents study classical and contemporary​ ​British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to the modern​ ​era. They examine how the historical, social, and cultural​ ​contexts of each period influenced writers. Particular attention​ ​is given to the form and function of different types of literature,​ ​including epic poetry, allegory, lyric poetry, fiction, nonfiction,​ ​and drama. The survey of British literature includes excerpts​ ​from Geoffrey Chaucer, William Shakespeare, and Virginia​ ​Woolf. Students write creative and analytical compositions and participate in collaborative discussions to refine their writing​ ​products.10Y
English 9Language ArtsClassic and contemporary works of American,​ ​British, and world literature in a variety of genres are​ ​introduced in English 9. Students analyze short fiction,​ ​nonfiction, and poetry selections. Students also read and​ ​analyze novels and other major literary works. Reading and​ ​writing assignments strengthen students’ understanding​ ​of literary elements in poetry, fiction, and drama; the​ ​characteristics of narrative, expository, and persuasive writing; correct grammar and usage; and research skills. The thematic​ ​units include works by Homer, Gabriel García Márquez,​ ​and Leslie Marmon Silko.10Y

Science

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
Course Credit
AG Accredited (Y/N)
BiologyScienceStudents have frequent opportunities to debate​ ​scientific findings and analyze how biology impacts society​ ​as they study topics such as ecology, genetics, and anatomy.​ ​Using both hands-on experiments and interactive tools, they​ ​also study cells, compare microorganisms, investigate plant​ ​and animal structure and function, and explore the history of​ ​life on Earth.10Y
BiotechnologyScienceIn today’s world, biotechnology helps us grow​ ​food, fight diseases, and create alternative fuels. In this course,​ ​students will explore the science behind biotechnology and how​ ​this science is being used to solve medical and environmental​ ​problems.5N
ChemistryScienceStudents are given the opportunity to model​ ​atomic structure and to observe, represent, and interpret​ ​reactions between atoms and molecules. Students​ ​investigate the properties of solutions and analyze the​ ​nature of solids, liquids, and gases using interactive tools.​ ​They describe and calculate the energies of different types of​ ​reactions and explore electrochemistry.10Y
Earth ScienceScienceStudents look at our planet’s place in the​ ​universe, at its composition, and at the many changes it may​ ​undergo. In addition, they study Earth’s history by comparing​ ​landforms, investigating the properties of rocks and minerals,​ ​analyzing weather patterns, and examining the relationships​ ​between the Earth, moon, and sun.10N
Physical ScienceScienceThis course is designed as an interactive,​ ​21st century course focusing on basic physics and chemistry.​ ​Topics include forces and motion, energy through waves,​ ​electricity and magnetism, the matter around us, and​ ​chemical bonding and reactions. This course will provide a​ ​foundation for the study of the physical sciences.10N
PhysicsScienceStudents apply the math and science skills they​ ​have already learned to explain the laws of motion, analyze​ ​the laws of thermodynamics, describe the behavior of waves,​ ​and investigate the relationship between electricity and​ ​magnetism. They are introduced to quantum physics and are​ ​asked to apply physics concepts to real-life situations.10Y

Social Studies

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
Course Credit
AG Accredited (Y/N)
American GovernmentSocial StudiesStudents examine concepts such as​ ​democracy, federalism, separation of powers, and checks and​ ​balances. The branches of government—legislative, executive, and​ ​judicial—are studied in depth. Students learn about the basic rights​ ​and responsibilities of U.S. citizens; the influence of political parties,​ ​the media, and interest groups; and the structure of local and​ ​state governments. The course presents information in a context​ ​relevant to students. Activities are designed to develop students’​ ​ability to read and evaluate different forms of information and​ ​communicate their ideas.5N
American GovernmentSocial StudiesThis course covers the foundations of​ ​American government, political behavior, and the three​ ​branches of the federal government. Built using responsive​ ​design principles, this HTML course is mobile-friendly, meets​ ​accessibility requirements, and includes expanded projects​ ​and assessments (including performance assessments).5N
EconomicsSocial StudiesThis course addresses concepts of economics,​ ​including a review of the American free enterprise system.​ ​Students learn about markets, business and labor, and banking​ ​and finance in the microeconomics sections, and then learn​ ​about measuring economic performance, the government’s role​ ​in the economy, and international trade and development in the​ ​macroeconomics section.5N
GeographySocial StudiesThis course addresses key concepts of physical​ ​and human geography and presents information about​ ​the United States, Canada, Latin America, Western Europe,​ ​Central Europe, Northern Eurasia, Central and Southwest​ ​Asia, Africa, South Asia, East Asia, the Pacific world,​ ​and Antarctica.10N
Geography and SocietySocial StudiesStudents explore geography skills​ ​and principles as they examine several case studies with geographic implications. They gain an understanding of the​ ​ways in which geography influences the daily lives of people​ ​around the world. This course covers the concepts of physical​ ​geography, human and environmental interaction, human​ ​systems, and the movement of peoples and their cultures.5N
United States HistorySocial StudiesThis course contains lessons​ ​addressing historical periods from the American Revolution​ ​to globalization and the 21st century. The lessons address​ ​key concepts, important historical figures, and significant​ ​events to help students gain an understanding of the​ ​political, economic, military and social structures of the early​ ​years of the United States through its emergence as a global​ ​superpower.10Y
US Law and PoliticsSocial StudiesTreason is the only crime specifically​ ​defined in the US Constitution. Why did the Constitution’s​ ​framers think it was so important to define it? In US Law and​ ​Politics, a one-semester course, you will learn the answer. This​ ​course begins by discussing types of courts and laws, including​ ​property law, school law, juvenile law, and even laws about automobiles. You will also learn about the judicial branch of​ ​government, public opinion and political behavior, political​ ​parties and interest groups, the electoral process, and the executive branch of government. Most Americans will vote in​ ​an election or participate in a court trial at some point in their​ ​lives. This course will help you become a responsible, well informed​ ​US citizen.5N
World GeographySocial StudiesStudents explore the world’s cultural​ ​regions by focusing on location, physical characteristics,​ ​demographics, historical changes, economic activity, and land​ ​use. They are encouraged to examine real-life situations,​ ​develop an understanding of multiculturalism, and explore the​ ​relationship between people and their environment.10N
World HistorySocial StudiesThis course provides students with a​ ​comprehensive examination of world history, from ancient​ ​times through present day. Students explore prehistory and​ ​early civilization, focusing on the ancient civilizations of the​ ​Americas, Egypt, India, China, Greece, and Rome. They study​ ​Medieval Christian Europe from the early to late Middle Ages;​ ​regional civilizations including the Muslim world, Africa, and​ ​Asia; and early modern times with a focus on the Renaissance,​ ​Reformation, and Global Age. The course explores social, political, and economic changes of the 19th and 20th​ ​centuries, including the industrial age and independence​ ​movements. Students study the impact of nationalism,​ ​imperialism, and the world wars. Finally, they explore the Cold​ ​War, new nations, and the effects of globalization.10Y

Electives

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
Course Credit
AG Accredited (Y/N)
Accounting IElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyThis course provides students with an​ ​introduction to accounting concepts and principles, financial​ ​statements, internal control design, and accounting for​ ​partnerships.5Y
Accounting IIElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyThe student will build upon knowledge​ ​gained in Accounting I and continue to explore topics such​ ​as corporate accounting and financial statements, long-term​ ​liabilities, cash flow, financial statement analysis, managerial​ ​accounting, budgeting, and the use of financial data to make​ ​business decisions.​ ​5Y
Administrative Duties and Office ManagementElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyStudents​ ​learn the skills and knowledge required to perform tasks in​ ​the administrative department of a medical office. Topics​ ​include, but are not limited to, receiving patients, scheduling​ ​appointments, handling medical records, and processing​ ​insurance claims.5N
Anatomy and PhysiologyElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyStudents learn about the​ ​anatomical structures and physiology of the human body.​ ​Body systems are discussed in terms of how each participates​ ​in homeostasis of the body. Students learn about selected​ ​major pathologies, including causes, symptoms, diagnostic procedures, and treatments, as well as common changes that​ ​occur throughout the lifespan.5Y
Anthropology 1Elective - HumanitiesThe aim of anthropology is to use a broad​ ​approach to gain an understanding of our past, present and​ ​future, and in addition, address the problems humans face​ ​in biological, social and cultural life. This course will explore​ ​the evolution, similarity and diversity of humankind through​ ​time. It will look at how we have evolved from a biologically​ ​and culturally weak species to one that has the ability to cause​ ​catastrophic change. Exciting online video journeys to different​ ​areas of the anthropological world are just one of the powerful​ ​learning tools utilized in this course.5Y
Anthropology 2Elective - HumanitiesAnthropology has helped us better​ ​understand cultures around the world and through different​ ​time periods. This course continues the study of global cultures​ ​and the ways that humans have made sense of their world. We​ ​will examine some of the ways that cultures have understood​ ​and given meaning to different stages of life and death. The​ ​course will also examine the creation of art within cultures​ ​and how cultures evolve and change over time. Finally, we​ ​will apply the concepts and insights learned from the study of anthropology to several cultures found in the world today.5Y
Art HistoryElective - HumanitiesStudents begin exploring the basic elements of​ ​art and its role in history through their examination of works​ ​from Paleolithic times to the Roman Empire. The goal is to​ ​enhance students’ understanding of ancient history and show​ ​how art reflects historical events.10Y
Art in World CulturesElectiveThis course provides an introduction​ ​to fundamental techniques and concepts of representational​ ​and expressive drawing within a variety of media. Emphasis​ ​is on object representation, spatial illusion, and the​ ​organization of structural relationships in two-dimensional​ ​space.5N
Business CommunicationElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyStudents explore business​ ​communication, including letters, memos, electronic communication, written reports, oral presentations, and​ ​interpersonal communication. Resumes, application letters,​ ​interviewing tips, and employment follow-up are also covered.5Y
Business Information SystemsElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyThis course introduces​ ​students to various information and communications​ ​technologies and explains how information systems are used to​ ​solve problems and make better business decisions.5Y
Business LawElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyStudents explore principle areas of business​ ​law and topics such as torts, crimes, intellectual property,​ ​contracts, negotiable instruments, agency, employment, and​ ​forms of business organization. They learn rules of law and legal​ ​terminology, as well as legal solutions for business-related issues.5Y
Business MathElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyThe student will explore topics such as​ ​business statistics, profit calculations, payroll, banking,​ ​interest calculations, insurance, taxes, and other business​ ​topics.5Y
Career Planning and Skill DevelopmentElective - CTEAs a high school​ ​student, it may seem like an eternity before you’ll be working for​ ​a living. However, you will be entering the working world sooner​ ​than you think—so it’s important that you’re prepared. Career​ ​Planning and Skill Develop will learn about qualities that will make you a successful employee and additional career-related​ ​skills, such as problem-solving and communication.5N
CosmetologyElective - CTEInterested in a career in cosmetology?​ ​This course provides an introduction to the basics of cosmetology. Students will explore career options in the​ ​field of cosmetology, learn about the common equipment​ ​and technologies used by cosmetologists, and examine​ ​the skills and characteristics that make someone a good​ ​cosmetologist. Students will also learn more about some​ ​of the common techniques used in caring for hair, nails,​ ​and skin in salons, spas, and other cosmetology related​ ​businesses.0.5N
Creative WritingElective - Language ArtsFor many hundreds of years, literature​ ​has been one of the most important human art forms. It​ ​allows us to give voice to our emotions, create imaginary​ ​worlds, express ideas, and escape the confines of material​ ​reality. Through creative writing, we can come to understand​ ​ourselves and our world a little bit better. This course​ ​provides students with a solid grounding in the writing​ ​process, from finding inspiration to building a basic story to using complicated literary techniques and creating strange,​ ​hybrid forms of poetic prose and prose poetry. By the end of​ ​this course, students will learn how to discover their creative​ ​thoughts and turn those ideas into fully realized pieces of​ ​creative writing.5N
Criminal InvestigationElectiveStudents examine the process of​ ​identifying and arresting criminal suspects, types of crimes​ ​and offenses, and preparing for court. They study the history​ ​of criminal investigation and explore the relationship between​ ​investigation and the courtroom process by examining case​ ​studies.5Y
CriminologyElective - CTEIn today’s world, crime and deviant behavior​ ​rank at or near the top of many people’s concerns. In​ ​this course, we will study the field of criminology—the​ ​study of crime. We will look at possible explanations for​ ​crime from the standpoint of psychological, biological and sociological perspectives, explore the categories and social​ ​consequences of crime, and investigate how the criminal​ ​justice system handles not only criminals, but also their misdeeds. Why do some individuals commit crimes when​ ​others do not? What aspects in our culture and society​ ​promote crime and deviance? Why are different punishments​ ​given for the same crime? What factors—from arrest to​ ​punishment—help shape the criminal case process?5N
Current EventsElective - ScienceHow can you discuss the important issues of our day in a meaningful way? Current Events is an introductory, one semester, elective course structured to increase your understanding of current issues in areas of politics, society, and economics. This course emphasizes research, and the topics you will encounter are broad in nature to allow for fluctuation in media coverage on common topics. You will engage in discussion of issues with your peers, including long-standing, complex issues of debate in our country such as capital punishment, genetic engineering, censorship, prayer in schools, gun control, affirmative action, immigration, and global warming. You will express your viewpoints on these subjects using the text of your research​ ​to support your statements. Upon completing this course, you will have a greater understanding of some of the political, social, and economic issues that have dominated the news in recent years. You will distinguish between objective and subjective thought in your thinking and sources’ reasoning and will learn to make educated decisions as to whether the sources present biased or unbiased coverage. For each content unit, you will write essays that demonstrate your research efforts, integrating current viewpoints with the background conversation about issues. Basic writing skills such as paragraph development and good mechanics are a prerequisite.5N
Developmental WritingElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyStudents apply the fundamental​ ​tools and techniques needed to write clear sentences, effective paragraphs, and well-organized essays for general​ ​education courses and employment settings. Using Standard​ ​American English, students learn to organize, clarify, and​ ​communicate written ideas, as well as how to use correct​ ​sentence structure, grammar, and parts of speech in written​ ​communication. Students also develop skills in revising and​ ​editing to clarify voice, tone, style, and mode.5Y
Digital Photography IElective - HumanitiesHave you ever wondered how​ ​photographers take such great pictures? Have you tried to take photographs and wondered why they didn’t seem to​ ​capture that moment that you saw with your eyes? The Digital​ ​Photography I course focuses on the basics of photography,​ ​including building an understanding of aperture, shutter​ ​speed, lighting, and composition. Students will be introduced​ ​to the history of photography and basic camera functions.​ ​Students will use the basic techniques of composition and​ ​camera functions to build a portfolio of images, capturing​ ​people, landscapes, close-ups, and action photographs.5N
Digital Photography IIElective - HumanitiesIn today’s world, photographs are​ ​all around us, including in advertisements, on websites, and​ ​hung on our walls as art. Many of the images that we see have​ ​been created by professional photographers. In this course,​ ​we will examine various aspects of professional photography,​ ​including the ethics of the profession, and examine some​ ​of the areas that professional photographers may choose​ ​to specialize in, such as wedding photography and product​ ​photography. We will also learn more about some of the most respected professional photographers in history, and​ ​we will learn how to critique photographs in order to better​ ​understand what creates an eye-catching photograph.5N
Driver’s EducationElective - OtherStudents study the Highway​ ​Transportation System, road signs, rules of the road, accident avoidance, and making good choices behind the wheel.​ ​They begin to develop the skills necessary to become safe,​ ​responsible drivers. Throughout the course, students will increase their knowledge of real-world driving. (Additional time​ ​is required for driving experience, which is not included in this​ ​course.)5N
Earth Space ScienceElective - ScienceThis is a laboratory course focusing​ ​on the study of space and the geologic and atmospheric​ ​forces that shape our world. Through experimentation and​ ​investigation, students will explore Earth’s cycles, including​ ​the geosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, atmosphere, and​ ​the carbon cycle.5N
Emergent Computer TechnologyElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyIn this course, students​ ​learn the basics of building safe websites, including the use​ ​of hypertext markup language (HTML). They then plan their​ ​own sites and learn how to link and navigate pages. As they​ ​progress to more complex design techniques, students also learn how graphics can make a site more attractive.5N
Environmental ScienceElective - ScienceThis course presents relationships​ ​between organisms and how these relationships relate to the​ ​functioning of ecosystems. Students learn the key concepts​ ​and processes of nutrient cycling, biomes, pollution, energy​ ​resources, and habitat destruction. The course also covers​ ​ways to promote biodiversity and create a sustainable future.5N
Fashion and Interior DesignElective - CTEIn this course, students​ ​explore what it is like to work in the industry by exploring career possibilities and the background needed to pursue them.​ ​Students will learn the basics of color and design then test their​ ​skills through hands-on projects. In addition, they’ll develop the essential communication skills that build success in any​ ​business. By the end of the course, students be well on their way​ ​to developing the portfolio they need to get their stylishly clad​ ​foot in the door of this exciting field.5N
Financial LiteracyElective - MathematicsThe key to a happy, successful life is to​ ​make a lot of money, right? Not really. No matter how much​ ​money you have, you still need the skills to use the money​ ​in your life responsibly and meaningfully. This one-semester​ ​course in financial literacy serves to give you an appreciation​ ​and respect for money. Too often, young adults begin their​ ​financial careers in disarray due to a lack of understanding​ ​of the short- and long-term effects of financial decisions.​ ​As these young people grow into adults, they don’t have a​ ​strong foundation on which to build their financial futures.​ ​This course introduces you to the importance of money and​ ​the decisions made with regard to it. The topics in this course include defining wealth, using decision-making and goalsetting skills, the benefits and costs of employment, how to read your​ ​paycheck, how to manage and spend money, and how to save​ ​and invest money.5N
Forensic Science IElective - CTEFingerprints. Blood spatter. DNA​ ​analysis. The world of law enforcement is increasingly making​ ​use of techniques and knowledge from the sciences to​ ​better understand the crimes that are committed and to​ ​catch those individuals responsible. Forensic science applies​ ​scientific knowledge to the criminal justice system. This​ ​course focuses on some of the techniques and practices​ ​used by forensic scientists during a crime scene investigation (CSI). Starting with how clues and data are recorded and​ ​preserved, the student will follow evidence trails until the CSI​ ​goes to trial, examining how various elements of the crime scene are analyzed and processed.5N
Forensic Science IIElective - CTEAlthough the crime scene represents​ ​the first step in solving crimes through forensic science,​ ​the crime laboratory plays a critical role in the analysis of​ ​evidence. This course focuses on the analysis of evidence and​ ​testing that takes place within this setting. We will examine​ ​some of the basic scientific principles and knowledge that​ ​guides forensic laboratory processes, such as those testing​ ​DNA, toxicology, and material analysis. Techniques such​ ​as microscopy, chromatography, odontology, entomology,​ ​mineralogy, and spectroscopy will be examined.5N
Fundamentals of ArtElective - HumanitiesWhat words can you use to describe​ ​the parts that make up great art? What terms do artists​ ​apply to their creations in order to achieve intended results?​ ​Fundamentals of Art, an entry-level, one-semester course,​ ​introduces you to the theory and practice of art. You will​ ​begin your study with intensive vocabulary application of the​ ​terms of art to help you critically and insightfully discuss—​ ​and eventually write about—art. This course discusses and​ ​demonstrates the elements (line, color, shape/form, space,​ ​value, and texture) and principles of art (balance, harmony,​ ​unity, emphasis, repetition, rhythm, contrast, and composition)​ ​through the incorporation of famous works of art, as well​ ​as with the use of interactive graphics and activities. You​ ​will study classic representations of art that demonstrate​ ​particular elements and principles, such as paintings by​ ​Pissarro, daVinci, Cimabue, Manet, Van Gogh, Gauguin, Renoir,​ ​and Monet. This course focuses on teaching you to analyze​ ​works of art rather than create art. Before enrolling in this​ ​course, you should have basic skills in analysis and writing​ ​about subjects using evidence to support your ideas.5N
Fundamentals of Art AppreciationElective - HumanitiesFine art doesn’t just​ ​include paintings. Did you know that graphic art, crafts, and architecture all fall under this category, too? Fundamentals​ ​of Art Appreciation is an introductory, one-semester course​ ​that explores various aspects of art to encourage you to develop an awareness of, and admiration for, fine art. This​ ​course focuses on teaching you to analyze works of art rather​ ​than create art. As you begin to examine the elements and principles of art in this course, you will study important works​ ​of art selected from various types of media, including painting,​ ​sculpture, architecture, printmaking, and photography. The course also explores crafts and graphic design and​ ​computer art. You will learn about various types of art media​ ​and techniques as you investigate the question of why art is created. This course provides you with a working knowledge of​ ​concepts and an enriched vocabulary so that you can become​ ​a more informed consumer of art.5N
Fundamentals of Art HistoryElective - HumanitiesMoments in time and place​ ​work to inspire our most treasured works of art. Can you imagine if Goya lived during the violence and revolution of​ ​19th century Spain? How would Daguerre have expressed​ ​himself artistically if he had not invented photography?​ ​Each artist expresses his unique moment and place in​ ​history. Fundamentals of Art History is an introductory, one semester​ ​course designed to develop your understanding​ ​and appreciation for the visual arts. This course focuses on​ ​teaching you to analyze works of art rather than create art.​ ​In this course, you will explore the arts, artists, and their​ ​cultures from prehistoric times through the present. You will​ ​begin to explore important works of art selected from various​ ​types of media, including painting, sculpture, architecture,​ ​and photography. As the course presents works of different​ ​periods, you will receive the historical and geographic context​ ​necessary for gaining a deeper appreciation of the pieces. This​ ​course provides you with a working knowledge of concepts​ ​and an enriched vocabulary so that you can become a more​ ​informed consumer of art.5N
Fundamentals of English CompositionElective - Language ArtsWe’ve all been​ ​there. An empty page in front of us, the deadline for our three page​ ​essay looming. Writing can be hard, but it’s an essential​ ​skill for life—even after you’ve finished school. As a beginning​ ​writer, you will gain the tools you need to write effectively for​ ​school and life in Fundamentals of English Composition. In this​ ​one-semester course, you will explore not only how to write,​ ​but why. All writing serves a purpose. This course defines the characteristics of effective writing, identifies different purposes​ ​for writing, and teaches you strategies for achieving those​ ​purposes. The course also provides in-depth instruction on the writing process, focusing on prewriting and revision. In​ ​the last part of the course, you will evaluate your own work by​ ​looking at it through the eyes of a reader. When you finish the​ ​course, you will have written an analytical essay, a persuasive​ ​cover letter, and a personal narrative; you will also have been​ ​exposed to peer review practices and guidelines for accepting​ ​and offering constructive criticism.5N
Gothic LiteratureElective - Language ArtsFrom vampires to ghosts, these frightening​ ​stories have influenced fiction writers since the 18th century.​ ​This course will focus on the major themes found in Gothic​ ​literature and demonstrate how the core writing drivers​ ​produce, for the reader, a thrilling psychological environment.​ ​Terror versus horror, the influence of the supernatural, and​ ​descriptions of the difference between good and evil are​ ​just a few of the themes presented. By the time students​ ​have completed this course, they will have gained an​ ​understanding of, and an appreciation for, the complex nature​ ​of dark fiction.5Y
Great Minds in ScienceElective - ScienceIs there life on other planets? What extremes can the human body endure? Can we solve the problem of global warming? Today, scientists, explorers, and writers are working to answer all of these questions. Like Edison, Einstein, Curie, and Newton, the scientists of today are asking questions and working on problems that may revolutionize our lives and world. This course focuses on 10 of today’s greatest scientific minds. Each unit takes an in-depth look at one of these individuals, and shows how their ideas may help to shape tomorrow’s world.5N
Health Science IIElective - CTEChallenging. Variable. Rewarding. These three words can be used to describe many careers in the health sciences. In this course, you will learn more about what it takes to be a successful health science professional, including how to communicate with patients. You’ll explore the rights and responsibilities of both patients and health science professionals in patient care and learn more about how to promote wellness among patients and health care staffs. Finally, you’ll learn more about safety in health science settings and the challenges and procedures of emergency care, infection control, and blood-borne pathogens.5N
Health SciencesElective - CTEWill we ever find a cure for cancer? What treatments are best for conditions like diabetes and asthma? How are illnesses like meningitis, tuberculosis, and the measles identified and diagnosed? Health sciences provide the answers to questions such as these. In this course, students will be introduced to the various disciplines within the health sciences, including toxicology, clinical medicine, and biotechnology. They will explore the importance of diagnostics and research in the identification and treatment of diseases. The course presents information and terminology for the health sciences and examines the contributions of different health science areas.5N
Health, Safety & NutritionElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyStudents learn about the​ ​physical and psychological needs of children, from birth to​ ​age eight, and how to meet these needs in group settings.​ ​Topics include wellness of young children, standards,​ ​guidelines and national initiatives, children’s nutritional​ ​needs, safe and healthy environments, emergency response,​ ​child abuse and neglect, educational experiences, and​ ​partnering with families.5N
History of the HolocaustElective - ScienceHolocaust education requires a comprehensive study of not only times, dates, and places, but also the motivation and ideology that allowed these events. In this course, students will study the history of anti-Semitism; the rise of the Nazi party; and the Holocaust, from its beginnings through liberation and the aftermath of the tragedy. The study of the Holocaust is a multi-disciplinary one, integrating world history, geography, American history, and civics. Through this in-depth, semester-long study of the Holocaust, high school students will gain an understanding of the ramifications of prejudice and indifference and the potential for government-supported terror, and they will get glimpses of kindness and humanity in the worst of times.5Y
Hospitality and TourismElective - CTEWith greater disposable income​ ​and more opportunities for business travel, people are traversing the globe in growing numbers. As a result,​ ​hospitality and tourism is one of the fastest growing​ ​industries in the world. This course will introduce students​ ​to the hospitality and tourism industry, including hotel​ ​and restaurant management, cruise ships, spas, resorts,​ ​theme parks, and other areas. Student will learn about​ ​key hospitality issues, the development and management​ ​of tourist locations, event planning, marketing, and environmental issues related to leisure and travel. The​ ​course also examines current and future trends.5N
Human GeographyElective - ScienceHow do language, religion, and landscape affect the physical environment? How do geography, weather, and location affect customs and lifestyle? Students will explore the diverse ways in which people affect the world around them and how they are affected by their surroundings. Students will discover how ideas spread and cultures form, and learn how beliefs and architecture are part of a larger culture complex. In addition to introducing students to the field of human geography, this course will teach students how to analyze humans and their environments.5Y
Human Resource ManagementElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyThe student will learn​ ​important human resource management skills used by​ ​business managers in day-to-day operations. While focusing​ ​on various aspects of human resource management and​ ​practices, problem-solving and critical-thinking skills are​ ​applied.5Y
International BusinessElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyFrom geography to culture global​ ​business is an exciting topic in the business community today. This course is designed to help students develop​ ​the appreciation, knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to​ ​live and work in a global marketplace. Students will gain​ ​a global view of business, learn how today’s businesses​ ​are more interconnected than ever, and investigate why​ ​and how companies go international. The course further​ ​provides students a conceptual tool by which to understand​ ​how economic, social, cultural, political and legal factors​ ​influence both domestic and cross-border business. Business​ ​structures, global entrepreneurship, business management,​ ​marketing, and the challenges of managing international​ ​organizations will all be explored in this course. Students will​ ​cultivate a mindfulness of how history, geography, language,​ ​cultural studies, research skills, and continuing education are​ ​important in both business activities and the 21st century.5Y
Introduction to AnthropologyElective - HumanitiesHave you ever wondered​ ​what it would be like to live during a different time in history? What would it have been like to live as a caveman? How about​ ​during the Ice Age or severe droughts and famines? Thanks​ ​to archaeologists, forensic scientists, and other experts in anthropology, we know a lot about what our ancestors’ lives​ ​would have been like—even before written history. Introduction​ ​to Anthropology, a beginner-level, one-semester course,​ ​focuses on humanity’s past, present, and future by exploring the​ ​evolution, similarities, and diversity of humankind through time.​ ​The course considers how humans evolved from a biologically​ ​and culturally weak species to a more powerful one that has the ability to cause catastrophic change. Ultimately, you will be asked​ ​to consider the problems humans face in biological, social, and​ ​cultural life. Exciting online videos lead you through journeys to​ ​different areas of the world throughout the course, giving you​ ​insight into other cultures and your own place in the world.5N
Introduction to CommunicationElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyThe student will examine​ ​the communication process, including elements of listening​ ​and verbal and nonverbal communication. The course also​ ​explores how these communication elements operate​ ​between self, individuals, and groups. Communication​ ​concepts and skills are explored through a variety of methods​ ​and activities.5Y
Introduction to Computer ApplicationsElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyIn this course, students use electronic media and software to apply academic concepts in the creation of meaningful organizers, projects, and presentations. Students locate, retrieve, and evaluate data in order to construct and analyze databases. Students produce presentations on Internet safety, online predators, and cyberbullying. At the end of the course, students become effective communicators and collaborators as they plan, evaluate, and synthesize research emphasizing current issues with technology.5N
Introduction to Criminal JusticeElective - CTEStudents explore law​ ​enforcement, the courts, and the correctional system. They​ ​study what crime is, how crime is measured, and theories of​ ​crime causation. They also examine issues and challenges​ ​within the criminal justice system and its future directions.5Y
Introduction to Culinary ArtsElective - CTEFood is fundamental to life.​ ​Not only does it feed our bodies, but it’s often the centerpiece for family gatherings and social functions with friends. In this​ ​course, you will learn all about food, including food culture, food​ ​history, food safety, and current food trends. You’ll also learn​ ​about the food service industry and try your hand at preparing​ ​some culinary delights. Through hands-on activities and in-depth​ ​study of the culinary arts field, this course will help you​ ​hone your cooking skills and give you the opportunity to explore careers in this exciting industry.5N
Introduction to DrawingElective - HumanitiesLearning to draw is like learning​ ​any new skill: it takes practice, practice, practice. Introduction​ ​to Drawing is a one-semester course for beginning and​ ​intermediate artists that provides training in the application​ ​of artistic processes and skills. In this course, you will learn​ ​the basics of line, contour, shading, texture, perspective,​ ​composition, and action drawing. You will examine artwork​ ​and demonstrate your newly learned skills by creating several​ ​original works of art and compiling a portfolio of your artwork.5Y
Introduction to Early Childhood EducationElective - CTEThis course​ ​provides the historical, theoretical, and developmental​ ​foundations for educating young children, with emphasis​ ​on creating inclusive environments and curricula for​ ​diverse children and their families. Topics include​ ​historical influences, program types, guidance strategies,​ ​professionalism, current trends and issues, and advocacy.5Y
Introduction to FinanceElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyStudents gain an understanding​ ​of financial management, including key language and terminology, time-value of money, financial markets and​ ​securities, financial statements, financial analysis, risk and return, valuation of stocks and bonds, capital budgeting and valuation, cost of capital and capital structure, working capital​ ​management, dividend policy, and international finance.​ ​Students apply financial tools and understand how they impact​ ​financial decision making.5N
Introduction to Grammar and CompositionElective - Language ArtsBefore you​ ​can learn to write, you have to master the art of composing​ ​sentences and using the correct words. If you struggle with​ ​language and grammatical rules get in the way of your ability​ ​to write, Introduction to Grammar and Composition will be a​ ​great course for you. This one-semester course focuses on using​ ​words and sentences correctly while keeping the goal of your​ ​writing in mind. This course shows you how words, sentences, paragraphs, and essays help writers express their thoughts.​ ​You will be given tools to understand and apply language and​ ​writing skills from the ground up. You will learn about the writing​ ​process and practice your skills through a variety of writing​ ​exercises. The goal of this course is to give you the confidence​ ​and skills you need to write a polished essay.5N
Introduction to Homeland SecurityElective - CTEThis course provides​ ​an overview of the elements involved in the homeland security function, as well as the challenges managers in government and​ ​industry can face while maintaining mission operations and staff​ ​accountability in the midst of multiple overlapping roles and​ ​responsibilities. The key functions of threat prevention, asset protection, crisis response, and operations recovery are addressed​ ​from a variety of perspectives.5Y
Introduction to LawElective - CTEStudents receive an overview of​ ​substantive and procedural areas of law and legal practice. They explore the legal profession, courts, ethics, sources of law,​ ​and alternative dispute resolution systems, and they analyze an​ ​application of law to factual circumstances.5Y
Introduction to ManufacturingElective - CTEThink about the last time​ ​you visited your favorite store. Have you ever wondered how​ ​the products you buy make it to the store shelves? Whether​ ​it’s video games, clothing, or sports equipment, the goods we​ ​purchase must go through a manufacturing process before they can be marketed and sold. In this course, you’ll learn about the​ ​types of manufacturing systems and processes used to create​ ​the products we buy every day. You’ll also be introduced to the​ ​various career opportunities in the manufacturing industry,​ ​including those for engineers, technicians, and supervisors. As a​ ​culminating project, you’ll plan your own manufacturing process​ ​for a new product or invention! If you thought manufacturing was little more than mundane assembly lines, this course will​ ​show you just how exciting and fruitful the industry can be.5N
Introduction to Medical AssistingElective - CTEStudents explore the​ ​role of the medical assistant, including professionalism,​ ​duties and responsibilities, and medical specialties. Also​ ​included is information on medical law and ethics, office​ ​management, and compliance and regulatory issues affecting​ ​the role of the medical assistant.5Y
Introduction to PsychologyElective - ScienceStudents gain an​ ​understanding of human behavior, including biological​ ​foundations and the brain, sensation, motivation, and​ ​perception. Students explore the relationship between​ ​learning and memory; various personality theories; emotions;​ ​states of consciousness; cognition; life-span development; and​ ​applied psychology.5Y
Introduction to Social MediaElective - CTEHave a Facebook account?​ ​What about Twitter? Whether you’ve already dipped your​ ​toes in the waters of social media or are still standing on the​ ​shore wondering what to make of it all, learning about how to​ ​interact on various social media platforms is crucial in order​ ​to survive and thrive in this age of digital communication.​ ​In this course, you’ll learn the ins and outs of social media​ ​platforms like Facebook®, Twitter®, Pinterest®, Google+®,​ ​and more. You’ll also discover other types of social media​ ​you may not have been aware of and how to use them​ ​for your benefit—personally, academically, and eventually​ ​professionally as well. If you thought social media platforms​ ​were just a place to keep track of friends and share personal​ ​photos, this course will show you how to use these resources​ ​in much more powerful ways.5N
Introduction to SociologyElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyStudents examine the​ ​sociological processes that underlie everyday life, focusing​ ​on globalization, cultural diversity, critical thinking, new​ ​technology, and the growing influence of mass media.5Y
Introduction to the Paralegal ProfessionElective - CTEThe student will​ ​explore the role of paralegals in the legal system, paralegal​ ​skills, legal working environments, ethical considerations,​ ​and career opportunities. The student is introduced to the​ ​sources of law, an overview of courts, and alternative dispute​ ​resolution systems.5Y
Introduction to Women’s StudiesElective - ScienceThis course, although​ ​looking specifically at the experiences of women, is not for​ ​girls only. If you are a student interested in exploring the world​ ​through film, and are open-minded enough to be interested in​ ​social change, then this course is for you.5N
Introductory AstronomyElective - ScienceWhy do stars twinkle? Is it possible to fall into​ ​a black hole? Will the sun ever stop shining? Since the first​ ​glimpse of the night sky, humans have been fascinated with​ ​the stars, planets, and universe that surrounds us. This course​ ​will introduce students to the study of astronomy, including its​ ​history and development, basic scientific laws of motion and gravity, the concepts of modern astronomy, and the methods​ ​used by astronomers to learn more about the universe.​ ​Additional topics include the solar system, the Milky Way and other galaxies, and the sun and stars. Using online tools,​ ​students will examine the life cycle of stars, the properties of​ ​planets, and the exploration of space.5N
Java Programming IElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyStudents explore programming​ ​fundamentals, basic problem solving, variables and assignments, math, conditionals, control flow, methods​ ​and functional abstraction, objects and data abstraction,​ ​inheritance and polymorphism, exception handling, graphical​ ​user interfaces, and external libraries. Students use Sun’s Java​ ​programming language throughout this course.5Y
Java Programming IIElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyStudents explore essential object oriented​ ​programming concepts, exception handling, recursion, generics, and important data structures in the​ ​Java Collections Framework. They also learn more advanced​ ​topics including algorithm analysis using Big O notation, a comparison of major sorting algorithms, and the creation and​ ​traversal of a binary search tree.5Y
JournalismElective - Language ArtsAs students work through each module, they​ ​will utilize Web 2.0 tools to respond to current news and shifts​ ​in journalism, create original projects, and reflect upon the​ ​changing face of news. Authentic assessments, interactive​ ​examples, and self-checks will deepen their understanding of​ ​the topics covered and prepare them for work or further study​ ​in the field of journalism.10Y
Law and OrderElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyEvery society has laws that its citizens must​ ​follow. From traffic laws to regulations on how the government​ ​operates, laws help provide society with order and structure.​ ​Our lives are guided and regulated by our society’s legal​ ​expectations. Consumer laws help protect us from faulty goods;​ ​criminal laws help to protect society from individuals who harm​ ​others; and family law handles the arrangements and issues​ ​that arise in areas like divorce and child custody. This course​ ​focuses on the creation and application of laws in various areas of society. By understanding the workings of our court system,​ ​as well as how laws are actually carried out, we become more​ ​informed and responsible citizens in our communities and of​ ​our nation.5N
Leadership and Supervision in BusinessElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyThis course​ ​examines the roles and responsibilities of supervisors in​ ​private, service, and public organizations. The student will​ ​gain an understanding of the expanded scope of supervisory​ ​responsibilities for business personnel ranging from first-time,​ ​first-line supervisors to top-level executives.5Y
Living Music I, IIElective - HumanitiesThis series of courses teaches students​ ​fundamental musicianship from a Western classical approach​ ​while aligning to national music education standards. Students​ ​use classic repertoire to analyze compositional style and​ ​are challenged to improve their rhythm, listening, notation,​ ​analysis, performance, and improvisation skills using virtual​ ​tools. With audio, visual, and interactive technologies, the​ ​course sequence provides a unique and progressively more​ ​advanced learning experience for students in grades 9–12.5Y
Marine ScienceElective - ScienceStudents will delve deep into Earth’s bodies of water and study geologic structures and how they impact the oceans. They will investigate characteristics of various populations of aquatic life, patterns of distribution, and ongoing changes occurring in our ecosystem. SOCIAL STUDIES5N
Medical Law and EthicsElective - CTEStudents gain an understanding of​ ​the legal and ethical issues that can impact professional roles in health care settings. Laws that regulate the healthcare industry, such as HIPAA, the Patient’s Bill of Rights, and​ ​standard of care, are introduced. Students are encouraged to consider the impact of personal ethics and morals on decision​ ​making.5Y
Medical TerminologyElective - CTEStudents explore medical​ ​terminology and its symbols and abbreviations, as well as​ ​the application of this new language in health care. They​ ​learn medical terms relating to body structure and function,​ ​and how to construct terms using word parts such as roots, suffixes, and prefixes.5Y
Music AppreciationElective - HumanitiesMusic is part of everyday lives and​ ​reflects the spirit of our human condition. To know and understand music, we distinguish and identify cultures on​ ​local and global levels. This course will provide students​ ​with an aesthetic and historical perspective of music,​ ​covering a variety of styles and developments from the​ ​Middle Ages through the 21st century. Students will acquire​ ​basic knowledge and listening skills, making future music​ ​experiences more informed and satisfying.5Y
Mythology and FolkloreElective - Language ArtsMighty heroes. Angry gods and​ ​goddesses. Cunning animals. Since the first people gathered​ ​around fires, mythology and folklore has been used as a way​ ​to make sense of humankind and our world. Beginning with​ ​an overview of mythology and different kinds of folklore,​ ​students will journey with ancient heroes as they slay dragons​ ​and outwit gods, follow fearless warrior women into battle, and watch as clever monsters outwit those stronger than​ ​themselves. They will explore the universality and social​ ​significance of myths and folklore, and see how these are still​ ​used to shape society today.5N
Peer CounselingElective - OtherHelping people achieve their goals is​ ​one of the most rewarding of human experiences. Peer​ ​counselors help individuals reach their goals by offering them​ ​support, encouragement, and resource information. This​ ​course explains the role of a peer counselor, teaches the​ ​observation, listening, and emphatic communication skills​ ​that counselors need, and provides basic training in conflict​ ​resolution and group leadership. Not only will this course​ ​prepare you for working as a peer counselor, but the skills​ ​taught will enhance your ability to communicate effectively in​ ​your personal and work relationships.5N
Personal and Family FinanceElective - CTEHow do our personal​ ​financial habits affect our financial future? How can we​ ​make smart decisions with our money in the areas of saving,​ ​spending, and investing? This course introduces students​ ​to basic financial habits such as setting financial goals,​ ​budgeting, and creating financial plans. Students will learn​ ​more about topics such as taxation, financial institutions,​ ​credit, and money management. The course also addresses​ ​how occupations and educational choices can influence​ ​personal financial planning, and how individuals can protect​ ​themselves from identity theft5N
Personal FinanceElective - ScienceThrough real-world applications and​ ​clear, engaging lessons, Personal Finance prepares students​ ​for making sound financial decisions. Exercises illustrate the​ ​influence of economics in daily life and show how financial​ ​decisions made today affect the future. The course covers​ ​topics such as financial and career planning; banking,​ ​savings, and investment programs; and stocks, bonds,​ ​and mutual funds.5N
Personal PsychologyElective - ScienceSelf-knowledge is the key to self improvement.​ ​More than 800,000 high school students take​ ​psychology classes each year. Among the different reasons,​ ​there is usually the common theme of self-discovery. Sample​ ​topics include the study of infancy, childhood, adolescence,​ ​perception and states of consciousness. Amazing online​ ​psychology experiments dealing with our own personal​ ​behavior are featured within this course.5Y
PhilosophyElective - HumanitiesThis course will take you on an exciting​ ​adventure that covers more than 2,500 years of history!​ ​Along the way, you’ll run into some very strange characters.​ ​For example, you’ll read about a man who hung out on​ ​street corners, barefoot and dirty, pestering everyone he​ ​met with questions. You’ll learn about another eccentric who​ ​climbed inside a stove to think about whether he existed.​ ​Despite their odd behavior, these and other philosophers of the Western world are among the most brilliant and​ ​influential thinkers of all time. As you learn about these great​ ​thinkers, you’ll come to see how and where many of the most fundamental ideas of Western civilization originated. You’ll​ ​also get a chance to ask yourself some of the same questions​ ​these great thinkers pondered. By the time you’ve “closed​ ​the book” on this course, you will better understand yourself​ ​and the world around you—from atoms to outer space, and​ ​everything in between.5N
Principles of ManagementElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyThe student is introduced to​ ​common management philosophies and issues in today’s changing world. The student will study globalization, ethics,​ ​diversity, customer service, and innovation from a managerial​ ​perspective.5Y
Principles of MarketingElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyStudents explore factors influencing​ ​how marketing decisions are made, including the impact of​ ​marketing decisions on an organization and its customers. They​ ​gain a working knowledge of practical marketing and business​ ​vocabulary. They also evaluate how the actions of competitors​ ​influence marketing decisions in the global marketplace.5Y
Principles of Public ServiceElective - CTEAre you familiar with the term​ ​“public service”? When we think about public service, our thoughts often turn to professionals such police officers, EMTs,​ ​and firefighters. While these are well-known public servants,​ ​many others work to keep our communities safe, healthy, and​ ​productive. In this course, you’ll learn about many different​ ​areas of public service, including education, civil engineering,​ ​and social services. You’ll also look at the requirements for​ ​public service in general, as well as the specific skills needed to​ ​be successful in each area of public service. Who knows? You​ ​may even discover the career you were meant to pursue!5N
Public SpeakingElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyThe student will gain a basic understanding​ ​of public speaking and the basic elements of a speech. The​ ​student will learn strategies to effectively communicate, to adapt​ ​to different audiences, and to practice organizational methods​ ​to create engaging speech content. Throughout the course,​ ​the student will develop and present original speeches to classmates.5Y
Real World ParentingElective - OtherWhat is the best way to care for​ ​children and teach them self-confidence and a sense of responsibility? Parenting involves more than having a child​ ​and providing food and shelter. Learn what to prepare for,​ ​what to expect, and what vital steps parents can take to​ ​create the best environment for their children. Parenting​ ​roles and responsibilities, nurturing and protective​ ​environments for children, positive parenting strategies, and​ ​effective communication in parent/child relationships are​ ​some of the topics covered in this course.5N
Research MethodsElective - CTEStudents practice the fundamentals of​ ​scientific research methodology by examining a social issue.​ ​They develop a research question, find and evaluate existing​ ​research, and design and implement an objective research​ ​method.5N
Sign Language IWorld LanguagesIn this course, students are introduced ​to the fundamental concepts of American Sign
Language. ​Students explore vocabulary, grammar, and conversational ​skills using basic
signing and fingerspelling techniques. ​They are exposed to activities and exercises that
help them ​understand the culture of deaf and hard-of-hearing people.
Sign Language IIWorld Languages In this course, students continue their ​study of American Sign Language (ASL). Students
expand ​their ASL vocabulary, grammar, and conversational skills. In ​addition, students
complete activities and exercises that help ​them understand the culture of the deaf and
hard-of-hearing ​community, including analyzing Deaf View/Image Art (De’VIA).
Social Problems IElective - OtherStudents will become aware of the​ ​challenges faced by social groups, as well as learn about the​ ​complex relationship among societies, governments and​ ​the individual. Each unit is focused on a particular area of​ ​concern, often within a global context. Possible solutions at both the structural level as well as that of the individual will​ ​be examined. Students will not only learn more about how​ ​social problems affect them personally, but begin to develop the skills necessary to help make a difference in their own lives​ ​and communities—not to mention globally.5Y
Social Problems IIElective - OtherThis course continues to examine​ ​social issues affecting individuals and societies around the​ ​globe. Students learn about the overall structure of the​ ​social problem, as well as how it impacts their lives. Each​ ​unit focuses on a particular social problem, including racial discrimination, drug abuse, the loss of community, and​ ​urban sprawl, and discusses possible solutions at both​ ​individual and structural levels. For each issue, students​ ​examine connections in the global arena involving societies,​ ​governments and the individual.5Y
Sociology IElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyThe world is becoming more complex. How do​ ​your beliefs, values and behavior affect the people around you​ ​and the world in which we live? Students will examine social​ ​problems in our increasingly connected world, and learn how​ ​human relationships can strongly influence and impact their​ ​lives. Exciting online video journeys to an array of areas in the sociological world are an important component of this relevant​ ​and engaging course.5Y
Speech and DebateElective - Language ArtsUsing video tutorials, students study​ ​verbal and nonverbal techniques—including those of famous​ ​orators—to use when presenting simple and complex​ ​ideas and when speaking to a group. Using an audiovisual​ ​tool to record their speeches, students learn how to speak persuasively, develop position statements, support their​ ​arguments, and think analytically. Brainstorming techniques,​ ​media analysis, research skills, and presentation strategies​ ​are also discussed.​ ​MATHEMATICS5Y
Sports & Entertainment MarketingElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyIn this course, students​ ​have the opportunity to explore basic marketing principles​ ​and delve deeper into the multi-billion dollar sports and​ ​entertainment marketing industry. They will learn about how​ ​professional athletes, sports teams, and well-known entertainers are marketed as commodities and how some of them become​ ​billionaires as a result. This course introduces fundamentals on​ ​how things work behind the scenes of a major sporting event,​ ​such as the Super Bowl®, or how to play a role in such an event.5Y
Sports ManagementElective - Business, Communication, Science, and. TechnologyIn this introduction to the​ ​fast-growing field, students explore topics such as sports marketing, branding, ticket sales, media relations, and ethics.​ ​They also learn tips for breaking into the industry. The activities​ ​and assignments require students to respond to real-world​ ​sports management scenarios.5N
Theater, Cinema, & Film ProductionElective - CTELights! Camera!​ ​Action! This course will introduce students to the basics of​ ​film and theater productions. Students will learn about the​ ​basics of lighting, sound, wardrobe, and camerawork for both​ ​film and theater settings. The course also explores the history​ ​of film and theater and the influence that they have had on​ ​society. Students will analyze and critique three influential​ ​American films; “Casablanca,” “Singin’ in the Rain,” and “The​ ​Wizard of Oz.”5N
Veterinary ScienceElective - CTEAs animals play an increasingly important​ ​role in our lives, scientists have sought to learn more about​ ​their health and well-being. Taking a look at the pets that live in​ ​our homes, on our farms, and in zoos and wildlife sanctuaries,​ ​this course will examine some of the common diseases and​ ​treatments for domestic animals. Toxins, parasites, and infectious diseases impact not only the animals around us, but at times,​ ​we humans as well! Through veterinary medicine and science,​ ​the prevention and treatment of diseases and health issues is​ ​studied and applied.5N
World ReligionsElective - ScienceThroughout the ages, religions from around​ ​the world have shaped the political, social, and cultural aspects​ ​of societies. This course focuses on the major religions that have​ ​played a role in human history, including Buddhism, Christianity,​ ​Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Shintoism, and Taoism.​ ​Students will trace the major developments in these religions​ ​and explore their relationships with social institutions and​ ​culture. The course will also discuss some of the similarities​ ​and differences among the major religions and examine the​ ​connections and influences they have.5N

Advanced Placement

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
Course Credit
AG Accredited (Y/N)
AP Art HistoryAdvanced Placement Students will examine major forms of artistic expression from the past and present and from a variety of cultures. While learning to look at these works of art critically, with intelligence and sensitivity, students will articulate what they see or experience.10Y
AP Calculus ABAdvanced Placement This college-level course covers such concepts as derivatives, integrals, limits, approximation, applications, and modeling. In the first semester, students begin by reviewing function notation, and then they explore absolute value, piecewise, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, polynomial, and rational functions. After studying limits and continuity, students move on to concepts of derivatives, including the chain rule, differentiation, implicit differentiation, and logarithmic differentiation. Toward the end of the course, students apply what they have learned to solve integration problems. This course prepares students for the AP Calculus AB exam. A TI-83+ or TI-84+ graphing calculator is required for this course, but it is not provided by Connections Academy.10Y
AP Calculus BCAdvanced Placement This course, an extension of AP Calculus AB, emphasizes broad concepts and applicable methods. Students describe and analyze functions, limits, and graphs; calculate and apply derivatives; interpret and apply integrals; and study polynomial approximations and series. The course provides opportunities for students to apply concepts to real-world situations. This course prepares students for the AP Calculus BC exam. A TI-83+ or TI-84+ graphing calculator is required for this course, but it is not provided by Connections Academy.10Y
AP English Language and CompositionAdvanced Placement This course provides high school students with college-level instruction in language, rhetoric, and exposition. Students study and write various kinds of analytic and persuasive essays on literary and non-literary topics. Students become skilled readers of prose written in various periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts. Both reading and writing assignments are designed to make students aware of the interaction among a writer’s subject and purpose and the audience’s expectations, as well as the way in which conventions and language contribute to effectiveness in writing. This course prepares students for the AP English Language and Composition exam by enabling them to read, comprehend, and write about complex texts while developing further communication skills at a college level.10Y
AP English Literature and CompositionAdvanced Placement This course prepares high school students for the AP English Literature and Composition exam by providing them with college-level instruction in various kinds of analytic and persuasive essays on literary and non-literary topics. Students become skilled readers of prose written in various periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts. Through their integrated reading and writing activities, students analyze and evaluate the interaction among a writer’s subject and purpose and the audience’s expectations, as well as the way in which conventions and language contribute to effectiveness in writing.10Y
AP Environmental ScienceAdvanced Placement The goal of this course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand interrelationships in the natural world, identify and analyze environmental problems that are natural and human-made, and prepare for the AP Environmental Science exam. Students evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems and examine alternative methods for resolving or preventing problems. Hands-on and virtual lab experiences support students’ ability to master the content.5N
AP MacroeconomicsAdvanced Placement Students will understand the choices they must make as producers, consumers, investors, and taxpayers. This course provides students with the knowledge and decision-making tools necessary for understanding how a society must organize its limited resources to satisfy its unlimited wants.5Y
AP MicroeconomicsAdvanced Placement This course introduces the ways in which people make use of limited resources. Students examine supply and demand, factors of production, the roles of labor and management, the relationship between the environment and the economy, and the impact of government policies on individuals’ economic decisions. Students also study the stock market and track the progress of various stocks. This course prepares students for the AP Microeconomics exam.5Y
AP PsychologyAdvanced Placement This is a college-level course providing students an overview of the development of human behaviors and thoughts. Along with preparation for the AP Psychology exam, the goals of this course are to immerse students in modern psychological investigation techniques, to accentuate the ethics and morality of human and animal research, and to emphasize scientific critical thinking skills in application to the social sciences.10Y
AP StatisticsAdvanced Placement Students gain an understanding of the​ ​vocabulary, method, and meaning of statistics. They explore​ ​data and patterns found in the world around them by​ ​analyzing information and noting statistical relationships. They​ ​apply their knowledge to relevant, open-ended tasks requiring​ ​them to connect multiple statistical topics together. To​ ​demonstrate their comprehension, students actively construct​ ​experiments to understand, interpret, communicate, and​ ​apply statistical methods. General topics of study include​ ​planning and designing a study, anticipating patterns, and​ ​making statistical inferences. This course prepares students​ ​for the AP Statistics exam.10Y

Foreign Language

For credit foreign language courses are NCAA approved using the Middlebury curriculum listed here.

Course
Course Type
Course Description
Credit Value
HS Spanish IForeign LanguageHigh School Spanish I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to Spanish-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the Hispanic world. High School Spanish I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School Spanish I provides the foundation and path for continued learning.10
HS Spanish IIForeign LanguageHigh School Spanish II is the second level of high school Spanish designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts. They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate Spanish.10
HS French IForeign LanguageHigh School French I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to French-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the Francophone world. High School French I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School French I provides the foundation and path for continued learning.10
HS French IIForeign LanguageHigh School French II is the second level of high school French designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations and interactive activities. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts. They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate French.10
HS German IForeign LanguageHigh School German I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to German-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the German-speaking world. High School German I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School German I provides the foundation and path for continued learning.10
HS German IIForeign LanguageHigh School German II is the second level of high school German designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts. They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various German-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate German.10
HS Chinese IForeign LanguageHigh School Chinese I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to Chinese-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the Chinese-speaking world. Both Chinese characters and pinyin are presented together throughout the course and specific character practices are introduced after the first quarter. High School Chinese I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School Chinese I provides the foundation and path for continued learning.10
HS Chinese IIForeign LanguageHigh School Chinese II is the second level of high school Chinese designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Character recognition and practice are a key focus and students are expected to learn several characters in each unit; however, pinyin is still presented with characters throughout the course to aid in overall comprehension. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Chinese-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. By the second semester, instruction is almost entirely in Chinese. High School Chinese II is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate Chinese.10
HS Latin IForeign LanguageSince mastering a classical language presents different challenges from learning a spoken world language, students learn Latin through ancient, time honored, classical language approaches which include repetition, parsing, written composition, and listening exercises. These techniques, combined with a modern multimedia approach to learning grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, provide students with a strong foundation for learning Latin. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading comprehension activities, writing activities, multimedia culture, history, and mythology presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on engaging with authentic classical Latin through weekly encounters with ancient passages from such prestigious authors as Virgil, Ovid, and Lucretius. The curriculum concurs with the Cambridge school of Latin; therefore, students will learn ancient high classical styles of pronunciation and grammar in lieu of generally less sophisticated medieval styles, making it possible for students to comprehend the most Latin from the widest range of time periods. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, understand and analyze the cultural and historical contexts of the ancient sources they study, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).1
HS Latin IIForeign LanguageStudents continue with their study of Latin through ancient, timeh honored, classical language approaches which include repetition, parsing, written composition, and listening exercises. These techniques, combined with a modern multimedia approach to learning grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, prepare students for a deeper study of Latin. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading comprehension activities, writing activities, multimedia culture, history, and mythology presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. The emphasis is on reading Latin through engaging with myths from the ancient world which are presented in Latin. The curriculum concurs with the Cambridge school of Latin; therefore, students will learn ancient high classical styles of pronunciation and grammar in lieu of generally less sophisticated medieval styles, making it possible for students to comprehend the most Latin from the widest range of time periods. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, understand and use common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, understand and analyze the cultural and historical contexts of the ancient sources they study, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).1